Reviews

  • Jun 04, 2021

    Comedic gem. I picked this one out to watch at my birthday party for the first time many years ago, and we all laughed so hard we fell out of our chairs and cried on the floor. Highlights: Yoko Ono as the lead featuring comic--hiding under a blanket, she is the true star of this one. The freaked out guy in the audience in the yellow poncho whose trip has gone bad almost steals this one from her, ultimately he doesn't quite have her comedic timing. John Lennon eating noodles and mumbling while out of his mind on drugs also tries to steal a scene here, but once Ono starts her monologue (screaming--also see her version of Katy Perry's "Fireworks" for this), it's Yoko's show all the way... ...until Mick Jagger performs "Sympathy for the Devil", and rips off his shirt to reveal his very dangerous temporary tattoos of the Joker/Devil. All the comedians are in this one killing you with their music and their time, and hilarity ensues. Watch it with your friends.

    Comedic gem. I picked this one out to watch at my birthday party for the first time many years ago, and we all laughed so hard we fell out of our chairs and cried on the floor. Highlights: Yoko Ono as the lead featuring comic--hiding under a blanket, she is the true star of this one. The freaked out guy in the audience in the yellow poncho whose trip has gone bad almost steals this one from her, ultimately he doesn't quite have her comedic timing. John Lennon eating noodles and mumbling while out of his mind on drugs also tries to steal a scene here, but once Ono starts her monologue (screaming--also see her version of Katy Perry's "Fireworks" for this), it's Yoko's show all the way... ...until Mick Jagger performs "Sympathy for the Devil", and rips off his shirt to reveal his very dangerous temporary tattoos of the Joker/Devil. All the comedians are in this one killing you with their music and their time, and hilarity ensues. Watch it with your friends.

  • Jul 27, 2016

    Great performances from every band featured in this film. It is really a treat to get to see all of these bands appearing so young on screen. I can't never get enough of Pete Townshend windmills. The main problems with this film is just the fact that it is terribly mastered. We need a blu-Ray copy right now... Also Yoko Ono's glass shattering screams were bothering.

    Great performances from every band featured in this film. It is really a treat to get to see all of these bands appearing so young on screen. I can't never get enough of Pete Townshend windmills. The main problems with this film is just the fact that it is terribly mastered. We need a blu-Ray copy right now... Also Yoko Ono's glass shattering screams were bothering.

  • Dec 27, 2014

    Great artists, great songs, great performances. A Rolling Stones-inspired and headlining concert from 1968. Staged inside a circus tent, it has some superb acts: Jethro Tull, The Who, Taj Mahal, The Dirty Mac (a temporary supergroup consisting of John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards and Mitch Mitchell) and, of course, the Rolling Stones. All of these deliver in spades. Marianne Faithfull is also there and is not too bad. On the downside, unfortunately, John Lennon lets Yoko Ono sing... Though that's using the term "sing" in it's broadest definition... While the Stones' performance is great, I would have preferred a more even spread, song-wise, between the artists. While the Stones get 6 or 7 songs on the movie, all the others only get one. A few more tracks from The Who and Jethro Tull would have been awesome.

    Great artists, great songs, great performances. A Rolling Stones-inspired and headlining concert from 1968. Staged inside a circus tent, it has some superb acts: Jethro Tull, The Who, Taj Mahal, The Dirty Mac (a temporary supergroup consisting of John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards and Mitch Mitchell) and, of course, the Rolling Stones. All of these deliver in spades. Marianne Faithfull is also there and is not too bad. On the downside, unfortunately, John Lennon lets Yoko Ono sing... Though that's using the term "sing" in it's broadest definition... While the Stones' performance is great, I would have preferred a more even spread, song-wise, between the artists. While the Stones get 6 or 7 songs on the movie, all the others only get one. A few more tracks from The Who and Jethro Tull would have been awesome.

  • Feb 21, 2013

    This strange '60s concert film headlined by The Rolling Stones is pretty cool. The Stones rock as expected (hey Brian Jones is still there!), but their opening acts are Jethro Tull, The Who, and a one off supergroup called The Dirty Mac: which features John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Mitch Mitchell, and Keith Richards...pretty awesome during song #1 (The Beatles "Yer Blues") but I think I and everyone else could do without the talentless Yoko's squealing on song #2. Mostly this is just a stylish and cool bunch of performances pulled together by The Stones and their Circus theme, which is somewhat fun (a neat conversation between Lennon and Jagger is cool). Directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who also directed the Beatles break-up documentary "Let it Be".

    This strange '60s concert film headlined by The Rolling Stones is pretty cool. The Stones rock as expected (hey Brian Jones is still there!), but their opening acts are Jethro Tull, The Who, and a one off supergroup called The Dirty Mac: which features John Lennon, Eric Clapton, Mitch Mitchell, and Keith Richards...pretty awesome during song #1 (The Beatles "Yer Blues") but I think I and everyone else could do without the talentless Yoko's squealing on song #2. Mostly this is just a stylish and cool bunch of performances pulled together by The Stones and their Circus theme, which is somewhat fun (a neat conversation between Lennon and Jagger is cool). Directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who also directed the Beatles break-up documentary "Let it Be".

  • Dec 18, 2012

    Apart from Yoko Ono's retched screeching, this tour de force features epic performances from Jethro Tull, Taj Mahal, John Lennon, the Stones--but most notably, the Who and their masterfully crafted "A Quick One While He's Away".

    Apart from Yoko Ono's retched screeching, this tour de force features epic performances from Jethro Tull, Taj Mahal, John Lennon, the Stones--but most notably, the Who and their masterfully crafted "A Quick One While He's Away".

  • Dec 18, 2012

    Apart from Yoko Ono's retched screeching, this tour de force features epic performances from Jethro Tull, Taj Mahal, John Lennon, the Stones--but most notably, the Who and their masterfully crafted "A Quick One While He's Away".

    Apart from Yoko Ono's retched screeching, this tour de force features epic performances from Jethro Tull, Taj Mahal, John Lennon, the Stones--but most notably, the Who and their masterfully crafted "A Quick One While He's Away".

  • Nov 19, 2012

    Originally made in 1968 but shelved by the Rolling Stones themselves this rock concert movie is a real time capsule which contains several good performances and one outstanding one. The bands come together as the Stones compere the performances including John Lennons Supergroup The Dirty Mac with ErIc Clapton ,Keith Richards and Lennon performing Yer Blues and then Yoko turns up and screams her head off and i had to put my fingers in my ears as it waslowly doing my head in. The Stones of course get to perform and their numbers inlcude Jagger at his very best on Sympathy for the Devil and other numbers. Brian Jones is clearly on another planet during the performance and its a shame to see a once great talent a bloated and shaking mess. But all that is topped by and outstanding performance by The Who performing Pete Townsends mini opera A quick one. Keith Moon is simply brilliant and the rest of the band excel as they blow everyone else away including the star act. A good concert film then but skip Yokos wailing and Turn The Who up to 11 .

    Originally made in 1968 but shelved by the Rolling Stones themselves this rock concert movie is a real time capsule which contains several good performances and one outstanding one. The bands come together as the Stones compere the performances including John Lennons Supergroup The Dirty Mac with ErIc Clapton ,Keith Richards and Lennon performing Yer Blues and then Yoko turns up and screams her head off and i had to put my fingers in my ears as it waslowly doing my head in. The Stones of course get to perform and their numbers inlcude Jagger at his very best on Sympathy for the Devil and other numbers. Brian Jones is clearly on another planet during the performance and its a shame to see a once great talent a bloated and shaking mess. But all that is topped by and outstanding performance by The Who performing Pete Townsends mini opera A quick one. Keith Moon is simply brilliant and the rest of the band excel as they blow everyone else away including the star act. A good concert film then but skip Yokos wailing and Turn The Who up to 11 .

  • Jan 28, 2012

    [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122344449-2.jpg[/img] With the advent of DVD, it is now possible to own a piece of rock 'n' roll history. Until recently, it wasn't possible to see the entire show that was recorded on December 11, 1968, featuring the Rolling Stones, The Who, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Jethro Tull, Marianne Faithful and Taj Mahal. The Who's electrifying segment, the mini-opera "A Quick One While He's Away", had been chopped and sped up for Jeff Stein's 1978 documentary, The Kids Are Alright (and then fully restored for the remastered DVD release). But The Who's performance was so exceptionally excellent, that they blew away the Stones, and the project was shelved until recently. [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122344276-2.jpg[/img] According to Pete Townshend, who gives an excellent verbal essay about the film in the special features, the Rock and Roll Circus sprang from an idea that he and Ronny Lane hatched. Pete, always the art student, was looking for a way to elevate rock 'n' roll into a live installation piece, while Ronny wanted to actually hire a circus tent and then tour the United States by train, performing music like circuses performed in a bygone era. The idea proved unfeasible, due to the sorry state of US railways at the time (though a similiar plan would come into being in 1970, with the [url="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=15858&entryid=108150&view=public"]Festival Express[/url] tour across Canada featuring the Dead, the Band, Janis Joplin and others, and Ronnie Lane would tour England with his own band and a circus tent). Anyway, the Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus was then reconceptualized as a TV variety show, featuring rock acts interspersed by circus acrobats -- trapeze artists, clowns and a fire eater. Besides The Who, other noteworthy performances are "Song for Jeffrey" by Jethro Tull (here, you can see Ian Anderson's style of performing that inspired Ron Burgundy's flute playing in Anchorman), and Taj Mahal backed by a blues trio, singing the R&B standard "Ain't That a Lot of Love". There is more Taj in the special features, and I could have stood for some more Jethro Tull, too. [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122343944-2.jpg[/img] Marianne Faithful, who at the time was dating Mick Jagger and was lusted after Pete Townshend and most other men in the British music scene, performs the poppy "Something Better". John Lennon came on, with his supergroup, The Dirty Mac, featuring Eric Clapton on guitar, Keith Richards on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums. They did "Yer Blues", so far so good. Then Yoko Ono came up with violinist Ivry Gitlis. The band struck up a blues riff and I got a sick feeling as Yoko bopped around the stage and the violinist played some high, classical sounding passages. That sick feeling was confirmed when Yoko leaned into the mic and started wailing -- one of the most infamous moments in rock history. But in his commentary, Pete Townshend defends Yoko's performance, terming it "art", and revolutionary for its time. He then proceeds to take the piss out of The Darkness, saying that British metal act is doing essentially the same thing, but with a better sense of marketing. Yoko had brains and talent, Pete says, while all The Darkness has is a guy in Spandex catsuit. Okay, I guess I now understand where Pete stands on The Darkness, a band that I happen to enjoy listening to. [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122343770-2.jpg[/img] The Stones themselves close out the show with six songs: "Jumping Jack Flash", "Parachute Woman", "No Expectations", "You Can't Always Get What You Want", "Sympathy for the Devil" and "Salt of the Earth". They were ragged, having been out of practice for awhile (while The Who had just come off a tour of Australia and were in fine form). Mick had stage presence (which according to Pete had been honed to perfection while Mick was working on the film Performance, just prior to this), but his singing was off-key, and the band was merely going through the numbers. But they did gel by the end of "You Can't Always", with "Sympathy for the Devil" fully up to speed and sounding good and their anthem to the working man, "Salt of the Earth" transcending the other songs. The DVD also includes a commentary by director Michael Lindsay Hogg, Mick, Keith, Ian Anderson and others. I haven't listened to that, yet, but will.

    [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122344449-2.jpg[/img] With the advent of DVD, it is now possible to own a piece of rock 'n' roll history. Until recently, it wasn't possible to see the entire show that was recorded on December 11, 1968, featuring the Rolling Stones, The Who, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Jethro Tull, Marianne Faithful and Taj Mahal. The Who's electrifying segment, the mini-opera "A Quick One While He's Away", had been chopped and sped up for Jeff Stein's 1978 documentary, The Kids Are Alright (and then fully restored for the remastered DVD release). But The Who's performance was so exceptionally excellent, that they blew away the Stones, and the project was shelved until recently. [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122344276-2.jpg[/img] According to Pete Townshend, who gives an excellent verbal essay about the film in the special features, the Rock and Roll Circus sprang from an idea that he and Ronny Lane hatched. Pete, always the art student, was looking for a way to elevate rock 'n' roll into a live installation piece, while Ronny wanted to actually hire a circus tent and then tour the United States by train, performing music like circuses performed in a bygone era. The idea proved unfeasible, due to the sorry state of US railways at the time (though a similiar plan would come into being in 1970, with the [url="http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=15858&entryid=108150&view=public"]Festival Express[/url] tour across Canada featuring the Dead, the Band, Janis Joplin and others, and Ronnie Lane would tour England with his own band and a circus tent). Anyway, the Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus was then reconceptualized as a TV variety show, featuring rock acts interspersed by circus acrobats -- trapeze artists, clowns and a fire eater. Besides The Who, other noteworthy performances are "Song for Jeffrey" by Jethro Tull (here, you can see Ian Anderson's style of performing that inspired Ron Burgundy's flute playing in Anchorman), and Taj Mahal backed by a blues trio, singing the R&B standard "Ain't That a Lot of Love". There is more Taj in the special features, and I could have stood for some more Jethro Tull, too. [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122343944-2.jpg[/img] Marianne Faithful, who at the time was dating Mick Jagger and was lusted after Pete Townshend and most other men in the British music scene, performs the poppy "Something Better". John Lennon came on, with his supergroup, The Dirty Mac, featuring Eric Clapton on guitar, Keith Richards on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums. They did "Yer Blues", so far so good. Then Yoko Ono came up with violinist Ivry Gitlis. The band struck up a blues riff and I got a sick feeling as Yoko bopped around the stage and the violinist played some high, classical sounding passages. That sick feeling was confirmed when Yoko leaned into the mic and started wailing -- one of the most infamous moments in rock history. But in his commentary, Pete Townshend defends Yoko's performance, terming it "art", and revolutionary for its time. He then proceeds to take the piss out of The Darkness, saying that British metal act is doing essentially the same thing, but with a better sense of marketing. Yoko had brains and talent, Pete says, while all The Darkness has is a guy in Spandex catsuit. Okay, I guess I now understand where Pete stands on The Darkness, a band that I happen to enjoy listening to. [img]http://img3.buzznet.com/assets/users8/wisekwai/entertainment/gallery-msg-1122343770-2.jpg[/img] The Stones themselves close out the show with six songs: "Jumping Jack Flash", "Parachute Woman", "No Expectations", "You Can't Always Get What You Want", "Sympathy for the Devil" and "Salt of the Earth". They were ragged, having been out of practice for awhile (while The Who had just come off a tour of Australia and were in fine form). Mick had stage presence (which according to Pete had been honed to perfection while Mick was working on the film Performance, just prior to this), but his singing was off-key, and the band was merely going through the numbers. But they did gel by the end of "You Can't Always", with "Sympathy for the Devil" fully up to speed and sounding good and their anthem to the working man, "Salt of the Earth" transcending the other songs. The DVD also includes a commentary by director Michael Lindsay Hogg, Mick, Keith, Ian Anderson and others. I haven't listened to that, yet, but will.

  • Jan 28, 2012

    The only thing that's more obvious than defining Mick, Keith & Charlie at the height of their powers is utter uselessness of Brian Jones. Glad they fired him. The Dirty Mac supergroup is fun, as is seeing Tony Iommi play with Jethro Tull. But it really is all about the Stones. Their performance is not only a highlight here, but a highlight of their entire career.

    The only thing that's more obvious than defining Mick, Keith & Charlie at the height of their powers is utter uselessness of Brian Jones. Glad they fired him. The Dirty Mac supergroup is fun, as is seeing Tony Iommi play with Jethro Tull. But it really is all about the Stones. Their performance is not only a highlight here, but a highlight of their entire career.

  • Jan 21, 2012

    This is surprisingly good!

    This is surprisingly good!