The Good, the Bad and the Ugly Reviews

  • Sep 05, 2019

    Sergio Leon's sprawling spaghetti Western epic has Eastwood as the man with no name heading the search for hidden treasure in a grave yard. Ending with the classic three way face off.

    Sergio Leon's sprawling spaghetti Western epic has Eastwood as the man with no name heading the search for hidden treasure in a grave yard. Ending with the classic three way face off.

  • Aug 30, 2019

    i cant believe i waited so long to watch this timeless masterpiece. so many newer movies have borrowed from this epic western, but none have bettered it

    i cant believe i waited so long to watch this timeless masterpiece. so many newer movies have borrowed from this epic western, but none have bettered it

  • Aug 28, 2019

    The Man With No Name is my favorite movie character of all time and it's sad that I didn't enjoy this movie that much. The music was great and the premise is incredible. If done right this could have been the best western ever made. Or maybe the best movie ever made. However they focused too much on the civil war than they did the Wild West aspect of the film. The Man With No Name had like no screen time; the entire movie was a "Tuco fest". And on the subject of Tuco, I hated him. He was despicable and it drives me crazy he is the only character of the trilogy to fuck up the Man With No Name and get away with it. I mean I know The Man With No Name comes out on top at the end but it wasn't satisfying enough. The whole movie he was basically Tuco's hostage and was pushed around by him. I hated that, it put a huge dent in his awesome Statius. Not to mention I hated how he only wore the iconic Poncho for the last fifteen minutes. I know it's a prequel but his character is not complete without the costume. I would have liked to seen him wear it more. Also it lacked action. The first two movies were full of awesome gun fights and bad ass shoot outs. There weren't enough of that in this movie. Another thing I hate about this movie was there was no Villain. The Bad was a great character and I hate how he was only in the movie for like 10 minutes but he only fired his gun twice and killed 3 people. Not to mention he only fought the other characters once and their paths barley crossed. If you ask me a guy who's in a 3 hour Movie for ten minutes and contributes nothing to the action or opposition of the hero is so NOT THE VILLAIN. If The Man With No Name beat up Tuco at the end or had more Screen time and did more action sequences this would have been great. Also if the civil war subplot was focused on less that would have made the movie ten times better. Lastly the movies is about a quest across the wild west to find gold. If the quest aspect of the film had more attention it would be epic. Like more of a journey and build up to finding the treasure,It would be better. it wasn't a bad movie it was just very disappointing.

    The Man With No Name is my favorite movie character of all time and it's sad that I didn't enjoy this movie that much. The music was great and the premise is incredible. If done right this could have been the best western ever made. Or maybe the best movie ever made. However they focused too much on the civil war than they did the Wild West aspect of the film. The Man With No Name had like no screen time; the entire movie was a "Tuco fest". And on the subject of Tuco, I hated him. He was despicable and it drives me crazy he is the only character of the trilogy to fuck up the Man With No Name and get away with it. I mean I know The Man With No Name comes out on top at the end but it wasn't satisfying enough. The whole movie he was basically Tuco's hostage and was pushed around by him. I hated that, it put a huge dent in his awesome Statius. Not to mention I hated how he only wore the iconic Poncho for the last fifteen minutes. I know it's a prequel but his character is not complete without the costume. I would have liked to seen him wear it more. Also it lacked action. The first two movies were full of awesome gun fights and bad ass shoot outs. There weren't enough of that in this movie. Another thing I hate about this movie was there was no Villain. The Bad was a great character and I hate how he was only in the movie for like 10 minutes but he only fired his gun twice and killed 3 people. Not to mention he only fought the other characters once and their paths barley crossed. If you ask me a guy who's in a 3 hour Movie for ten minutes and contributes nothing to the action or opposition of the hero is so NOT THE VILLAIN. If The Man With No Name beat up Tuco at the end or had more Screen time and did more action sequences this would have been great. Also if the civil war subplot was focused on less that would have made the movie ten times better. Lastly the movies is about a quest across the wild west to find gold. If the quest aspect of the film had more attention it would be epic. Like more of a journey and build up to finding the treasure,It would be better. it wasn't a bad movie it was just very disappointing.

  • Aug 19, 2019

    The single greatest spaghetti western of all time, I could watch this movie any day of the week. The film follows a bandit named Tuco who forms an uneasy alliance with the iconic man with no name in order to find a box of gold buried in a grave before the ruthless hitman Angel Eyes. The film has many colorful characters, yet Eli Wallach steals the show right from under Clint Eastwood's nose. This film has inspired many professional filmmakers over the years and anyone can see why. It's a perfect movie so I'm giving it an A+

    The single greatest spaghetti western of all time, I could watch this movie any day of the week. The film follows a bandit named Tuco who forms an uneasy alliance with the iconic man with no name in order to find a box of gold buried in a grave before the ruthless hitman Angel Eyes. The film has many colorful characters, yet Eli Wallach steals the show right from under Clint Eastwood's nose. This film has inspired many professional filmmakers over the years and anyone can see why. It's a perfect movie so I'm giving it an A+

  • Aug 18, 2019

    An ambitious Western of style and substance. Sergio Leone's Western epic The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly (1966) is a fascinating odyssey through America during The Civil War. Director Sergio Leone brings dozens of close-up shots of eyes and far wide shots of desert alike in his highly ambitious Western epic filled with hundreds of extras and cannon blasts. The gunfire is as riveting as his witty script brimming with creative solutions of traps his characters find themselves in as well as earnest character reveals. Leone's direction was never as sublime as his work during the movie's finale in the graveyard. All the engrossing journey of The Man with No Name Trilogy's franchise leads up to this point. Tuco is shot running with anticipating glee, so much so that Wallach is nearly skipping as he sprints around the graves. Leone's direction is full of detail. First off, Tuco is established earlier as not being able to read very well, so he cannot read the headstone's names, so Leone shoots this sequence with a disorienting blur of motion. Tuco is focused at all times, but the graves all blur past at increasingly fast speed. It's a holy experience hearing Ennio Morricone's The Ecstasy of Gold soar past as Tuco seeks the one grave that will make his life rich forever. I got teary eyed the first time I saw The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly (1966) during this wonderful scene. The Mexican standoff at the end of The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly is lovely as it's filmed with a wide shot of the entire circular graveyard center, but Leone uses close-ups of eyes and hands to build tremendous tension before any bullets are fired. Leone's choice of ending also establishes that Angel Eyes needed to die as the most murderous and evil character. Thus, Clint Eastwood had to be the one to shoot him as "The Good." Leone even leaves you laughing as Tuco's gun appears to jam at first, then Tuco reveals Eastwood emptied Tuco's bullets the night before. So, Eastwood's acting during the standoff is not like Van Cleef or Wallach, who have to depict nervous men that are deciding who to shoot. Eastwood's hero already knows he must shoot Angel Eyes as he's a real threat and the man that might kill him or shoot his friend Tuco. The jokes are hilarious within this film mostly because we often follow Eli Wallach's Mexican bandit Tuco as he bumbles and shoots his way to gold. Wallach plays "The Ugly" with all his soul as he pleads for compassion from his monk brother, then scorning him for his wrath. He gives The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly a grisly grit and unpredictable feel at all times. His rapport with Clint Eastwood's nameless hero is so funny as they try to double cross and murder each other constantly. Wallach stumbles around, fires off rounds and jeers at the world with reckless abandon as Tuco in his dirty jacket and muddy hands. Wallach was perfect as the memorable con man and robber. Eastwood is as quiet and cool as the man with no name. His grave facial expressions reveal his character's thoughts without a word needing to be said. When he does speak it's with a forlorn wisdom and regret for all the lives lost around him or an incredibly witty remark usually at the expense of Tuco. Eastwood truly embodies what a Western hero should be as "The Good" part of the film's equation. He seeks the money for his own use, but on the way he blows up a bridge for a Union Captain and comforts a dying Confederate soldier alike. Eastwood takes out criminal after criminal with his killer quick draw gunslinging that's as awesome to watch as he ever was on screen. Lee Van Cleef's villain Angel Eyes is fearsome slapping women, torturing men, gunning down families, and deceiving the Union Army. He is the most depraved gentlemen antagonist this film could have hoped for as "The Bad." His glares of hatred and smirks of knowing glee are chilling to behold. Lee Van Cleef was an amazing acting talent that he could stand next to Clint Eastwood and Eli Wallach in their prime and still be engaging and mysterious. In all, Sergio Leone was a master of the Western film genre and The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly demonstrates why. Cool shootouts, riveting storytelling, intriguing historical context, and outstanding acting from the 3 leads. Ennio Morricone's legendary score is just a genius icing the already masterfully crafted cake that is The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly.

    An ambitious Western of style and substance. Sergio Leone's Western epic The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly (1966) is a fascinating odyssey through America during The Civil War. Director Sergio Leone brings dozens of close-up shots of eyes and far wide shots of desert alike in his highly ambitious Western epic filled with hundreds of extras and cannon blasts. The gunfire is as riveting as his witty script brimming with creative solutions of traps his characters find themselves in as well as earnest character reveals. Leone's direction was never as sublime as his work during the movie's finale in the graveyard. All the engrossing journey of The Man with No Name Trilogy's franchise leads up to this point. Tuco is shot running with anticipating glee, so much so that Wallach is nearly skipping as he sprints around the graves. Leone's direction is full of detail. First off, Tuco is established earlier as not being able to read very well, so he cannot read the headstone's names, so Leone shoots this sequence with a disorienting blur of motion. Tuco is focused at all times, but the graves all blur past at increasingly fast speed. It's a holy experience hearing Ennio Morricone's The Ecstasy of Gold soar past as Tuco seeks the one grave that will make his life rich forever. I got teary eyed the first time I saw The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly (1966) during this wonderful scene. The Mexican standoff at the end of The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly is lovely as it's filmed with a wide shot of the entire circular graveyard center, but Leone uses close-ups of eyes and hands to build tremendous tension before any bullets are fired. Leone's choice of ending also establishes that Angel Eyes needed to die as the most murderous and evil character. Thus, Clint Eastwood had to be the one to shoot him as "The Good." Leone even leaves you laughing as Tuco's gun appears to jam at first, then Tuco reveals Eastwood emptied Tuco's bullets the night before. So, Eastwood's acting during the standoff is not like Van Cleef or Wallach, who have to depict nervous men that are deciding who to shoot. Eastwood's hero already knows he must shoot Angel Eyes as he's a real threat and the man that might kill him or shoot his friend Tuco. The jokes are hilarious within this film mostly because we often follow Eli Wallach's Mexican bandit Tuco as he bumbles and shoots his way to gold. Wallach plays "The Ugly" with all his soul as he pleads for compassion from his monk brother, then scorning him for his wrath. He gives The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly a grisly grit and unpredictable feel at all times. His rapport with Clint Eastwood's nameless hero is so funny as they try to double cross and murder each other constantly. Wallach stumbles around, fires off rounds and jeers at the world with reckless abandon as Tuco in his dirty jacket and muddy hands. Wallach was perfect as the memorable con man and robber. Eastwood is as quiet and cool as the man with no name. His grave facial expressions reveal his character's thoughts without a word needing to be said. When he does speak it's with a forlorn wisdom and regret for all the lives lost around him or an incredibly witty remark usually at the expense of Tuco. Eastwood truly embodies what a Western hero should be as "The Good" part of the film's equation. He seeks the money for his own use, but on the way he blows up a bridge for a Union Captain and comforts a dying Confederate soldier alike. Eastwood takes out criminal after criminal with his killer quick draw gunslinging that's as awesome to watch as he ever was on screen. Lee Van Cleef's villain Angel Eyes is fearsome slapping women, torturing men, gunning down families, and deceiving the Union Army. He is the most depraved gentlemen antagonist this film could have hoped for as "The Bad." His glares of hatred and smirks of knowing glee are chilling to behold. Lee Van Cleef was an amazing acting talent that he could stand next to Clint Eastwood and Eli Wallach in their prime and still be engaging and mysterious. In all, Sergio Leone was a master of the Western film genre and The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly demonstrates why. Cool shootouts, riveting storytelling, intriguing historical context, and outstanding acting from the 3 leads. Ennio Morricone's legendary score is just a genius icing the already masterfully crafted cake that is The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly.

  • Aug 09, 2019

    Far too long but still a great pix ,just needs to be edited down a bit.

    Far too long but still a great pix ,just needs to be edited down a bit.

  • Jul 31, 2019

    Ya its pretty much perfect western film. The score and soundtrack is one of the best and most rememberable ever. Clint Eastwood couldn't be any better. Eli Wallach is really good as Tuco. The cinematography is so great. Every shot makes you believe your in the movie. Costume design is good.

    Ya its pretty much perfect western film. The score and soundtrack is one of the best and most rememberable ever. Clint Eastwood couldn't be any better. Eli Wallach is really good as Tuco. The cinematography is so great. Every shot makes you believe your in the movie. Costume design is good.

  • Jul 29, 2019

    10/10 Absolute masterpiece.

    10/10 Absolute masterpiece.

  • Jul 26, 2019

    An ageless wonder.The music,the story,the scenery,the cast. Everything is perfect.

    An ageless wonder.The music,the story,the scenery,the cast. Everything is perfect.

  • max
    Jul 05, 2019

    Expertly made. The story and characters aren’t as investing as they should be

    Expertly made. The story and characters aren’t as investing as they should be