The Invisible Man Reviews

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April 3, 2020
There's a lot more to think about than a typical horror film. It's a real psychological thriller...a good strong film, not SCARY scary, but it gets in your head.
March 6, 2020
Ultimately, The Invisible Man makes for a pacey, if mostly predictable, reimagining of a classic Hollywood horror terror.
March 5, 2020
[Elizabeth Moss is] amazing and she does so much just with her eyes. It's a really demanding role physically [and] emotionally; it's a huge range she has to play.
March 5, 2020
Whannell is brilliant at distracting us with amusing, knowing dialogue (siblings are rivalrous; architects are trendy; waiters are irksomely urbane). Death comes when you least expect it.
March 2, 2020
A bracingly modern #MeToo allegory that, despite its brutal craft, rings hollow.
March 2, 2020
A smart, unexpected delight.
March 2, 2020
Whannell uses stillness and empty spaces against the audience expertly. But it's Moss who most sells this new, self-consciously serious take on a hammy monster movie premise.
March 2, 2020
While chock full of relatively good scares, campy effects and an ending that will tickle a very specific demographic of 1990s and 2000s thriller fans with glee, The Invisible Man doesn't deliver more than that.
February 29, 2020
In this heart-stopping update, the 'Gotcha!' moments really do surprise.
February 29, 2020
There's some cruelty in this visual; there are moments when The Invisible Man is not fun to watch. But the movie's violence opens up a larger question...
February 29, 2020
Despite its lack of pretense, there are actually layers of intelligent subtext curling beneath the standard horror plot.
February 28, 2020
"The Invisible Man" is a thrilling movie. If nothing else, it will make you question if that feeling you get of being watched is just in your head, or if there really is somebody else in the room.
February 28, 2020
The small scale of Whannell's film makes its bloodiest flourishes and nastiest jumps hit harder.
February 28, 2020
Whannell's direction, as well as his construction of scenes, is, for the most part, of the straight-to-cable variety, taking portentousness for suspense and the illustration of facts for drama.
Top Critic
February 27, 2020
Whannell has succeeded by deemphasizing blockbuster effects and engaging with an old monster in a new way. He's created an invisible man for 2020 while still embracing the foundational terrors of 1933.
February 27, 2020
Leigh Whannell's film is ingenious, frequently scary, and a Grand Guignol tour de force for Ms. Moss. It's also purposeful to a fault as a fable for the #MeToo era.
February 27, 2020
It's never fair to judge a movie based on what you want it to be. But when that movie sets an explicit goal and then fails to meet it - heck, doesn't even try to meet it - it's open season.
February 27, 2020
The reason The Invisible Man holds you in an emotional vise grip for so much of its running time is thanks almost entirely to Moss.
February 27, 2020
Conjures lots of creepiness, thanks foremost to star Elisabeth Moss, but this is one of those movies that works better the less time one spends sweating the details.
February 27, 2020
Directed by Leigh Whannell, whose screenplays jump-started the "Saw" and "Insidious" horror series, it's a sly, twisty little chiller, not ashamed of its B-movie bona fides and better for it.
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