The Many Saints of Newark

2021, Drama/Crime, 2h 0m

189 Reviews 500+ Verified Ratings

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critics consensus

Even as its storytelling chafes at the edges of its cinematic constraints, The Many Saints of Newark proves The Sopranos' allure is still powerful. Read critic reviews

audience says

Sopranos fans will enjoy seeing younger versions of some of their favorite characters, but the story may confuse casual viewers while frustrating the faithful. Read audience reviews

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Movie Info

Young Anthony Soprano is growing up in one of the most tumultuous eras in Newark's history, becoming a man just as rival gangsters begin to rise up and challenge the all-powerful DiMeo crime family's hold over the increasingly race-torn city. Caught up in the changing times is the uncle he idolizes, Dickie Moltisanti, who struggles to manage both his professional and personal responsibilities--and whose influence over his impressionable nephew will help make the teenager into the all-powerful mob boss we'll later come to know: Tony Soprano.

Cast & Crew

Alessandro Nivola
Dickie Moltisanti
Leslie Odom Jr.
Harold McBrayer
Vera Farmiga
Livia Soprano
Jon Bernthal
Johnny Soprano
Corey Stoll
Junior Soprano
Ray Liotta
"Hollywood Dick" Moltisanti, Salvatore "Sally" Moltisanti
Michela De Rossi
Giuseppina Moltisanti
Michael Gandolfini
Teenage Tony Soprano
Billy Magnussen
Paulie Walnuts
John Magaro
Silvio Dante
Alexandra Intrator
Teenage Janice Soprano
Gabriella Piazza
Joanne Moltisanti
Mason Bleu
Leon Overall
Lesli Margherita
Iris Balducci
Talia Balsam
Mrs. Jarecki
Kathryn Kates
Angie DeCarlo
David Chase
Screenwriter
Lawrence Konner
Screenwriter
Michael Disco
Executive Producer
Marcus Viscidi
Executive Producer
Toby Emmerich
Executive Producer
Richard Brener
Executive Producer
Kramer Morgenthau
Cinematographer
Bob Shaw
Production Design
Laura Ballinger
Art Director
Regina Graves
Set Decoration
Amy Westcott
Costume Designer
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Critic Reviews for The Many Saints of Newark

Audience Reviews for The Many Saints of Newark

  • Oct 09, 2021
    If you're a fan of The Sopranos, I can't say you'll enjoy The Many Saints of Newark, and if you're not a fan of The Sopranos, I can't say you'll enjoy The Many Saints of Newark. It's a prequel set in the early 1970s, decades before an adult Tony Soprano was ruling his turf in New Jersey and going to therapy to deal with his rising panic attacks. The Sopranos was an era-defining, ground-breaking show for HBO and creator David Chase would captivate and infuriate audiences in equal measure, mixing shocking violence, twisted comedy, strange side steps, pessimistic psychoanalysis, and stubborn subversive storytelling to its very end with a polarizing finale that still elicits debate to this day (count me in the Tony-is-dead camp). It would be too much to expect a return to that world to pack in all the entertainment and enrichment of a peak TV series, but I was at least hoping that Chase's return to his mobster magnum opus would present an engaging story that would add further insight or intrigue into the series and its characters. After two hours, I'm left shrugging like Silvio Dante and about as clueless as Paulie Walnuts. As personal background, I watched all seven seasons of The Sopranos and eagerly anticipated its finale in 2007. I was one of those people that even questioned whether my cable had somehow gone out as the series suddenly shifted to a black screen without further warning. I enjoyed the show though I haven't watched it since it originally concluded over ten years ago. It would be a worthy series to re-watch in our binge era, but I think I would keep my initial interpretation of the show and its self-loathing patriarch, Tony. I think over the course of 8 years Chase intended to demystify the perverse allure of organized crime and the glamor of Hollywood myth-making. I think he subversively took a familiar setup, a family man trying to fight for respect from his family and his Family, and knew many people would find themselves rooting for Tony Soprano and his underdog status and his potential redemption through therapy and self-analysis. Except, Chase's point, is that these bad men are not complicated, they're not geniuses, and they're not capable of real empathy. Tony's near-death experience and inevitable return to his old ways was proof of that. Chase created a vehicle where people sided with the anti-hero lead and he systematically provided more and more evidence that this man was cruel, impulsive, selfish, and incapable of redemption, and every episode, especially in that final season, pushed the viewer to ask, "How much longer can you look the other way? How many more excuses can you give?" It was Chase taking the appeal of mob movies and anti-heroes and testing viewer loyalty, making people question the appeal of these kinds of stories about these kinds of men. That's my reading. As a prequel, The Many Saints of Newark might appeal to the most diehard fans of The Sopranos who just want to have two hours more in this world, seeing these characters again one more time. Perhaps fans will thrill to see James Gandolfini's son, Michael Gandolfini, play teenage Tony Soprano. Perhaps they'll thrill to see Tony's mother at a younger age but recognize some of her self-pitying and antagonistic quirks that would define her as an elderly woman. Perhaps they'll thrill to watch Christopher Moltisanti's father, Dickie (Alessandro Nivola), as Tony's uncle, the man he said from the series who was so influential to him. In essence, this story, written by Chase and Lawrence Konner, is about how Tony got to be on his doomed path of crime. The fact that Tony is merely a supporting character in this tale is not a grievous structural fault. However, the fact that Dickie is such an uninteresting lead character in such an uninteresting and glum story is a significant fault. The Sopranos was dark and frustrating too, though your emotional investment was grander, but it was rarely boring. The majority of my time with Newark was spent stooped and patiently waiting for something meaningful to happen. There were bloody murders and gunfights and love affairs, but I kept waiting for it to seem like it mattered to the overall bigger picture. Very little in this movie ever felt important, because the movie doesn't invest in its own characters and its own story on their own terms, it merely coasts off the attached appeal of the TV show it's meant to link up to and coasts off the good will of its audience. If you removed the names of the characters, thus denying its creative inheritance, then I doubt even the most ardent fans of mob movies would find that much to appreciate here. If this wasn't a Sopranos movie, it wouldn't have gotten this platform and attention, and that seems less a reason to run with an underdeveloped story with a dull protagonist stumbling through mundane mob cliches. If Dickie is meant to be so influential, I don't understand the appeal. I guess he's slightly more emotionally stable than Tony's father, played by Jon Bernthal, but that's not saying much. Dickie violently confronts his father, "Hollywood Dick" (Ray Liotta), over his abuse of his young new bride from Italy, Giuseppina (Michela De Rossi), to defend her. That's good? But when Dickie takes up an affair with the same woman, his stepmom, he proves just as depressingly violent. That's bad. The problem is that Dickie is not a complex character to hang a movie upon. I thought there was going to be a slow temptation to begin an affair with his new stepmom, but that happens far too early, which places her as simply the "goomah" on the side he retreats to for sexual gratification and empty promises of building a life. She goes right from being a potentially interesting character, a woman with agency and danger, to another mob movie cliché, the arm candy waiting on her bad man to patronize her. Dickie says that his wife has had trouble conceiving, so I thought maybe this new stepmom would be revealed to be Christopher's actual birth mother. That's why she was here in this story. Nope, yet again this possibility is dismissed early. The Many Saints of Newark frustratingly takes every tedious story detour it can when presented. The movie is set primarily in the late 60s and early 70s in Newark, barely tackling the riots of 1967 to use them as a cover for a storytelling choice for Dickie. The entire subplot featuring the struggles of the African American community feel tacked on to this movie, as if Chase is responding to criticisms that his series wasn't diverse enough. The rise of Harold (Leslie Odom Jr.) as a gangster is given such little significance. He begins as an employee of Dickie's and then becomes a rival, but this complicated relationship isn't played like it's complicated. Every time Odom Jr. (One Night in Miami) appeared I kept hoping that finally the movie was going to give him something to dig into, to really explore this perspective in a meaningful way. The rivalry between Harold and Dickie doesn't even feel significant because both of these men are criminally underwritten. The Newark riots are played so incidentally and without consequence. Why begin to explore racial unrest and police brutality if you're just going to ignore it after twenty minutes of movie? As a movie, The Many Saints of Newark did not work for me. As a Sopranos prequel, The Many Saints of Newark did not work for me. I had some mild amusement and intrigue with moments like Corey Stoll going full force in his impression of a young Uncle Junior, with Vera Farmiga chewing the scenery as Tony's mother, and the impeccable resemblance of Gandolfini to his late father. I enjoyed the weirdness of Liotta playing twin brothers. I enjoyed the period appropriate production values and music choices. Unfortunately, it doesn't add up to a vital experience that lends better understanding and insight into the Sopranos universe. Again, some fans may just be happy enough to exist in this universe for two more hours, to soak up even the most superfluous of details (I know I would be for my TV show favorites). That's fine, but for me, what's on screen barely resembles the daring and complex characterization of the series. Maybe a movie was always set up to fall short but this one falls short even as a mediocre mob movie. Nate's Grade: C
    Nate Z Super Reviewer
  • Oct 02, 2021
    A really good, long awaited dose of Sopranos mythology!
    Mark J Super Reviewer
  • Oct 02, 2021
    Perhaps a more accurate tagline would be "Who didn't make Tony Soprano?" The movie is a very good epilogue for "The Sopranos" (yeah its technically a prequel but this needs to be watched after the show for any of it to make sense) as it lingers on death in some Interesting ways and does so with a lot of gallows humor.
    Alec B Super Reviewer

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