The Mitchells vs. the Machines

2021, Animation/Adventure, 1h 54m

183 Reviews 1,000+ Ratings

What to know

critics consensus

Eye-catching and energetic, The Mitchells vs. the Machines delivers a funny, feel-good story that the whole family can enjoy. Read critic reviews

audience says

Whether you're looking for humor, a heartwarming story, or great animation, The Mitchells vs. the Machines has something for everyone in the family. Read audience reviews

You might also like

Mune
Asterix: The Secret of the Magic Potion
Shopkins: Wild
Christmas Spirit
Firedrake the Silver Dragon

Where to watch

Rate And Review

User image

Verified

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)



  • You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Step 2 of 2

    How did you buy your ticket?

    Let's get your review verified.

    • Fandango

    • AMCTheatres.com or AMC AppNew

    • Cinemark Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Theater box office or somewhere else

    You're almost there! Just confirm how you got your ticket.

  • User image

    Super Reviewer

    Rate this movie

    Oof, that was Rotten.

    Meh, it passed the time.

    It’s good – I’d recommend it.

    Awesome!

    So Fresh: Absolute Must See!

    What did you think of the movie? (optional)

  • How did you buy your ticket?

    • Fandango

    • AMCTheatres.com or AMC AppNew

    • Cinemark Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Regal Coming Soon

      We won’t be able to verify your ticket today, but it’s great to know for the future.

    • Theater box office or somewhere else

The Mitchells vs. the Machines Videos

The Mitchells vs. the Machines Photos

Movie Info

Young Katie Mitchell embarks on a road trip with her proud parents, younger brother and beloved dog to start her first year at film school. But their plans to bond as a family soon get interrupted when the world's electronic devices come to life to stage an uprising. With help from two friendly robots, the Mitchells must now come together to save one another -- and the planet -- from the new technological revolution.

Cast & Crew

Abbi Jacobson
Katie Mitchell
Voice
Danny McBride
Rick Mitchell
Voice
Maya Rudolph
Linda Mitchell
Voice
Michael Rianda
Aaron Mitchell
Voice
Eric André
Mark Bowman
Voice
Jeff Rowe
Co-Director
Michael Rianda
Screenwriter
Jeff Rowe
Screenwriter
Phil Lord
Producer
Will Allegra
Executive Producer
Greg Levitan
Film Editor
Lindsey Olivares
Production Designer
Toby Wilson
Art Director
Show all Cast & Crew

Critic Reviews for The Mitchells vs. the Machines

Audience Reviews for The Mitchells vs. the Machines

  • Jun 03, 2021
    From the phenomenal team that made Spiderverse comes another visual feast, The Mitchells vs the Machines is a modern dysfunctional family story that is really brought to life with strong throwbacks and mind blowing art direction. I feel the familial themes and issues are a little uninspired but they're often dressed up with fast quips and fresh quirks that make them more digestible. Also the closing act has so much vibrant energy and real sentiment that it's largely forgivable if the early narrative doesn't grab your attention. What a way to bring back Numa Numa!
    Drake T Super Reviewer
  • May 04, 2021
    After watching it twice on Netflix, I have come to the conclusion that The Mitchells vs. The Machines is my favorite animated film since 2018's Into the Spider-Verse. It's so colorful, so exuberant, so clever, while still being heartfelt on its own terms and packing more jokes into a minute than any studio comedy in years. Everyone should check out 2021's first cinematic treat. The Mitchells are known as the weird family in their community. Rick (voiced by Danny McBride) is more about the outdoors and hands-on activities. His teenage daughter, Katie (Abbi Jacobson), is more about the digital sphere and creates her own sardonic, strange videos. She's leaving for college and eager to fly the coop. Rick feels his last opportunity to bond with his daughter is leaving with her, so he forces the family into a cross-country road trip to drop Katie off at her school. Linda Mitchell (Maya Rudolph) is doing her best to be supportive of her husband and daughter while trying to bridge their divide. Youngest son Aaron just wants everyone to get along and talk about dinosaurs endlessly. The road trip gets even more precarious with a machine uprising and flying robots rounding up humans to eventually jettison them into space. This is a gloriously entertaining movie that looks absolutely gorgeous. The animation is accentuated with similar styles from Into the Spider-Verse, so the filmmakers have implemented an overlay that adds a two-dimensional shaping and shading to the characters to provide more distinct definition. It's a new design I heartily enjoyed in the Oscar-winning Spider-Verse and I hope more major animation projects employ it. It's combining the fluidity and scale of 3D animation with the tactile and personal flavor of traditional animation. The movie also echoes its Gen Z-YouTube culture with cute hand drawn additions that will pop on the screen as accents or take over as quick freeze frames. I thought it was fun and a good indicator of Katie's meta-drenched sense of humor and creative voice. This is also an explosively colorful movie with vibrant arrays popping off the screen. There were several visual sequences that took my breath away just at the arrangement of colors. The heavy use of neon pastels made me wonder if Nicolas Winding Refn (Neon Demon) was a visual consultant. There's a stretch that highlights pinkish sunsets and the beautiful light blues of approaching dusk that I said this was the Nomadland of animated movies. Even when this movie has nothing happening, it's a pleasure just to take it in and appreciate the artistry. But oh my goodness there is so much happening with The Mitchells vs. The Machines. It's a longer animated movie at 110 minutes but it's also so fast-paced and antic, filled with ideas and jokes and moments it feels like it cannot wait to share. In some ways it feels like talking with a hyper-literate, boundlessly excited little kid, and I don't mean that as a negative. I'm sure there will be more than a few viewers who will tire out early or find the pacing exhausting, but if you're a fan of The Lego Movie and its hyperactive style of comedy, then you should be able to adapt here. The movie is densely packed with jokes, some that zip by in fractions of a millisecond to reward multiple viewings. I was laughing throughout and besides myself at several points, laughing hysterically from the slapstick to the offhand one-liners to the callbacks and silliness. There's a little of everything here comedy-wise and it all works. It's a buffet of laughs. One joke that is simply a tonally serious push-in on the question of mortality had me howling and it's only a one-second gag. There's a segment in a deserted shopping mall with the re-emergence of Furbys that is inspired lunacy ("Behold, the twilight of man!"). You have to be this good to be this smartly silly. This is the kind of comedy you can only do in the realm of animation, packing as much into the visual frame as possible and moving at the clip of the creative's imagination. The side characters are the film's secret weapons. The dumb dog made me laugh just about every time he was onscreen, and the fact that the movie legitimately finds a significant solution with this dog later is fantastic. The family also come across a pair of malfunctioning robots (voiced by Beck Bennett and Fred Armisen) and take them in as part of their unconventional family, and the robots are a terrific team for comedy bits, from their early entrance trying to ineptly persuade the family they are in fact humans ("Yum yum. Yum yum good.") to their one-off remarks from a confused perspective had me laughing regularly. The movie is more than just an assembly line of expertly calibrated gags, though again it must be said how flat-out hilarious this movie can be, like it's disarming how instant the funny can break. The Mitchells vs. The Machines is also a well written movie from a character perspective and makes the audience genuinely care about this self-described clan of weirdos. My girlfriend looked at the running time for the movie and initially balked at how long it was, especially since we had seemingly come to a part that could serve as its Act Two break. "It better be worth that extra time," she warned, and by the end even she agreed that it was time very well spent. The heart of the movie is on the father-daughter relationship and while the other characters don't get shut out, they become helpers to their various sides of this fractured relationship. The conflict is relatable, about the disconnection between two loved ones who just don't feel like they have much in common any longer. For Rick, he doesn't understand technology, the thing that Katie thrives in, and he's struggling to adjust to her growing older. Those familiar daddy-daughter points of bonding don't have the same appeal to her as a young woman increasingly embarrassed by her Luddite father. There's a sincere warmth between the two, it's just they don't know how to express it fully to the other person and be seen as how they would like to be seen. It's a generation gap, yes (Rick's fear of technology will ring true to those with Boomer parents), but it's also just two people who cannot use the same old tools to get the same results. The screenplay serves up both sides so that we see where each is coming from, understand their frustrations and overreaches, and pull for their reconciliation and growth. The themes are kept simple but expertly developed and with wonderful payoffs not just for Rick and Katie but for everyone. Each member of the Mitchell family unit has a character arc with a payoff, and each is utilized in a meaningful way with our outlandishly joyous climax, and that includes the dog and robots! Even the villain's perspective is a parallel to our central family conflict, and that is just good writing. The story is deceptively clever and there's more going on under the surface. Besides the visuals, the comedy gold, and the heartwarming family relationships, there's amazingly even more reasons to enjoy The Mitchells vs. The Machines. The voice acting is great, with McBride (This is the End) being a surprise standout as a loving middle-aged father. Also, of note, is that 2/3 of the principal cast of Netflix's Disenchanted series are found in this movie (where for art thou, Nat Faxon?). The thrumming musical score by Mark Mothersbaugh is a synth-heavy blast that made me recall the scores for Blade Runner 2047 and his own Thor: Ragnarok score. The movie even features inclusivity in a casual manner; the son's autism and the daughter being LGBTQ are treated with "yeah, sure" acceptance. At no point is either called out or featured in a moment to highlight this but neither are they dismissed as unimportant. Stick around because there are extra levels to the end credits, and I was happy for each because I didn't want this wonderful time to end, so I kept hoping for more resolution to play out. The movie was originally meant to be released a year and a half ago but COVID pulled its release date, and eventually Sony sold their project to Netflix for a cool $100 million. It's hard for me to put an exact price on a work of art (what is this, an NFT? Seriously, someone explain these things to me) but I'm happy Netflix saved this movie and gave it a home. At this point, I'm willing to give producers Phil Lord and Christopher Miller the utmost benefit of the doubt when it comes to anything animated. After Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, The Lego Movie, Spider-Verse, and now this, they haven't let me down yet. The Mitchells vs. The Machines is an eye-popping action movie and a superb comedy that the whole family can enjoy. Nate's Grade: A
    Nate Z Super Reviewer
  • May 04, 2021
    The Mitchells vs. the Machines has to be one of the better Netflix titles to come out in a long time. Innovative plot device that showcases the talented team of Lord and Miller. This is how they should be making original stories and it's refreshing to find another animated studio that can compete with Pixar. The films success lies with the characters and overall story arc that doesn't feel like its stuck in a typical cliche model. There's a rich universe here and it would've been nice for this film to open in all cinemas like it was previously intended. These filmmakers and writers have a giant future ahead of them and you'll not have wasted time if you visit this film. Maybe the success lies in the fact it was never a original Netflix release as their original content is more negative received. 03/05/2021
    Brendan O Super Reviewer
  • May 02, 2021
    How do I state this plainly? This is one of the funniest movies I have seen in years. This movie blew me away. Not just with it's comedy, which it totally nails, but with its heart as well. I normally hate this type of movie, the zeitgeist movie focused on tech and YouTube and what the kids are doing. There's no reason we need to, say, give Donald Duck's nephews cell phones or some crap like that; it's a trend in modern animation that destroys their timelessness in a gross corporate way. But for this film, for its fundamental message on tech culture, it has to be this way. And for having to be that way, it does it well! What I appreciate though, is that it also dives deep into the old world of tech with old-school meme pulls and even some very 90s tech in one of the movies funniest scene. But enough about the tech, how is the comedy and the heart? Well like I said, it's one of the funniest movies I've seen in years. I have not laughed this hard in a long time. There was one joke in particular that had me laughing for several minutes after it was over, and I'm still giggling thinking about it now. The whole film has an overwhelming energy and rampant sense of silliness that is hard to resist and hilarious to experience. It's also beautiful to look at. The film is CGI, but in a way that almost looks 2D, with sketchy designs on the characters that give them more life than some Pixar try-hards. Then there's all the filtered imagery on top of everything that is entirely 2D. Like the whole film went through a snapchat filter, we sort of see the world through the lens of the 18 year-old daughter who is obsessed with tech and movies. It's a brilliant framing device, and also gives us a glimpse in her mind. Sometimes these visuals give comedy, other times they serve as something of an inner monologue, but they're always creative and fun. Finally though, the heart. Yeah, they got that down too. It's a family road trip movie at its core, just with a robot apocalypse in the way. The story is really about these fundamentally different people who are stuck being related to each other finding their way back together again, and damn it all it does get you in the feels more than once. The Mitchells vs. The Machines surprised the hell out of me. It's not the type of movie I normally like, but it does it's message better than ever and makes it godamn work. With a great message, beautiful look, and comedy that is on freaking point it knocks it out of the park.
    Michael M Super Reviewer

Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

Movie & TV guides