The Wild Pear Tree (Ahlat agaci) Reviews

  • 1d ago

    A deep and moving film

    A deep and moving film

  • Jul 02, 2019

    It's always nice to peep Nuri Bilge Ceylan flicks. You know they are long, you know they look beautiful and you know they are driven by realisticness and poetry. This films comes in hard on the clock with three hours and eight minutes, so you have to hold the entire evening open and be mentally prepaired. If so, this might hit you quite hard. A young writer comes home to his hometown after graduating. He tries to publish his book, naturally not an easy thing for people without fonds or a name out yet. At the same time we can tell there's some trouble going on at his folks place. The father of the family own money to many people. He earn OK by his primary teacher job, but he spends it betting on horses, lying to his family. He also shines up a place further up in the mountains with his dad, digging a well that no one believes will get down to water. Put in a sister, half friends and the characters are drawn. What drives the film is the superb acting along with the great presentation of the main character. The way he picks up after his father and tries to figure out his head and future. This is, naturally, a film that looks wonderful. The seasoning colors, the forces of nature, the animals and the sounds around here is brilliant. The varied camera with trackshots, panaoramas, closeups and the more alternative ones makes it interesting from start to finish. Three hours plus seem way too long, but this master of storytelling make shure you never get bored. It develops from secret and unknown until solutions and then moves on to new sub plots you never thought of - still they fit perfectly. It does not bring much to this man's catalog in a way. It's the same recipe, technically and when it comes to the matter of presentation. Still, it works so perfectly fine and it stands strong on just the story - something that is just a part of the pillars here, really. With this piece NBC proves that his name is still one of the most important ones when it comes to world cinema. It's not any better than his three or four latest pieces, but it's just as good, and still a much needed variation of film as an artform. 8.5 out of 10 teas.

    It's always nice to peep Nuri Bilge Ceylan flicks. You know they are long, you know they look beautiful and you know they are driven by realisticness and poetry. This films comes in hard on the clock with three hours and eight minutes, so you have to hold the entire evening open and be mentally prepaired. If so, this might hit you quite hard. A young writer comes home to his hometown after graduating. He tries to publish his book, naturally not an easy thing for people without fonds or a name out yet. At the same time we can tell there's some trouble going on at his folks place. The father of the family own money to many people. He earn OK by his primary teacher job, but he spends it betting on horses, lying to his family. He also shines up a place further up in the mountains with his dad, digging a well that no one believes will get down to water. Put in a sister, half friends and the characters are drawn. What drives the film is the superb acting along with the great presentation of the main character. The way he picks up after his father and tries to figure out his head and future. This is, naturally, a film that looks wonderful. The seasoning colors, the forces of nature, the animals and the sounds around here is brilliant. The varied camera with trackshots, panaoramas, closeups and the more alternative ones makes it interesting from start to finish. Three hours plus seem way too long, but this master of storytelling make shure you never get bored. It develops from secret and unknown until solutions and then moves on to new sub plots you never thought of - still they fit perfectly. It does not bring much to this man's catalog in a way. It's the same recipe, technically and when it comes to the matter of presentation. Still, it works so perfectly fine and it stands strong on just the story - something that is just a part of the pillars here, really. With this piece NBC proves that his name is still one of the most important ones when it comes to world cinema. It's not any better than his three or four latest pieces, but it's just as good, and still a much needed variation of film as an artform. 8.5 out of 10 teas.

  • Apr 24, 2019

    best movie in turkey, ever.

    best movie in turkey, ever.

  • Apr 01, 2019

    Another challenging three hours film from Ceylan, and yet another win. "The Wild Pear Tree" is very dense and I had to stop here and there to take a breath and reset my brain, so yes, not the easiest of the watch, but just like the previous films, at the end you will find yourself thinking and reflecting on what went on, and that is always a great thing in this craft.

    Another challenging three hours film from Ceylan, and yet another win. "The Wild Pear Tree" is very dense and I had to stop here and there to take a breath and reset my brain, so yes, not the easiest of the watch, but just like the previous films, at the end you will find yourself thinking and reflecting on what went on, and that is always a great thing in this craft.

  • Mar 17, 2019

    Nuri Bilge Ceylan's most differentiated film. The story of three generations with son, father and grandfather. Humor, philosophy, character development, great cinematography, acting and story. The selection of the players is interesting and brave, adding a lot to filming. Only Nuri Bilge Ceylan could do this as a great master! Unlike the other films of the director, the dialogue in this film is at the forefront and the diversity, naturalness and depth of the dialogues are impressive. Thank you Ceylan for offering us such great movies!

    Nuri Bilge Ceylan's most differentiated film. The story of three generations with son, father and grandfather. Humor, philosophy, character development, great cinematography, acting and story. The selection of the players is interesting and brave, adding a lot to filming. Only Nuri Bilge Ceylan could do this as a great master! Unlike the other films of the director, the dialogue in this film is at the forefront and the diversity, naturalness and depth of the dialogues are impressive. Thank you Ceylan for offering us such great movies!

  • Feb 13, 2019

    Masterpiece! The best of Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

    Masterpiece! The best of Nuri Bilge Ceylan.

  • Feb 12, 2019

    An exceptionally good film. Arguably Ceylan's best yet.

    An exceptionally good film. Arguably Ceylan's best yet.

  • Feb 12, 2019

    The Wild Pear Tree is certainly drawn out in runtime, especially in the first half, and it has probably too much dialogue for many, but I love that and I found many of its conversations thought-provoking and brilliant. The movie needs to be seen for its dialogue alone as well as some important themes, and I also personally connected with the protagonist Sinan and seeing such a different, alienated main character in a movie was certainly very refreshing.

    The Wild Pear Tree is certainly drawn out in runtime, especially in the first half, and it has probably too much dialogue for many, but I love that and I found many of its conversations thought-provoking and brilliant. The movie needs to be seen for its dialogue alone as well as some important themes, and I also personally connected with the protagonist Sinan and seeing such a different, alienated main character in a movie was certainly very refreshing.

  • Feb 03, 2019

    another master piece by Nuri Bilge Ceylan

    another master piece by Nuri Bilge Ceylan

  • Jan 29, 2019

    The Old Boy And The Young Man. Ahlat Agaci Bilge Ceylan's making of a book is as meticulous as it can get, throbbing arguments that never crosses the line to be a preaching-to-the-choir tone, this drama is more horror than it claims to be. And similar to the summary of the plot- a son returns hometown after graduation and gets sucked into the sleazy schemes of his gambling father- the first act of the film can arguably considered as a bluff. And the journey of surprising us in each steps after the first act, that it promises to deliver us consistently, has its own cathartic release. But mind you, this game is played subconsciously with us, while the real drama on the screen comes like Rosefeldt's Manifesto- of course without sounding like a pretentious robotic monologue. I would consider this as writers major win among all the others. The writers always had in mind to go deep into hardcore debates of world politics, life changing inspirations and seduce-like negative emotions that grows like cancer as one ages. And their procedure is pure bravura of work, initiating from one of my favorite meetings of our protagonist with his somewhat-like-an-old-lover, the film deals with the social issues that is justified and well crafted out in narration since there was a ticking clock behind them. Cut to another nail-biting argument with an established writer, breaking the wall of celebrity and fan equation, the heating conversation is used as the primary weapon to start initiating on fabricating the other side of our lead character; this is the turning point of the film. Followed by another major discussion of probably everything, among his friends, the writers calls it a day on the preaching note as the viewers are left both cheated and challenged at the brisk of their seat. While our so called hero struggles with the rest of the world like such, along with the nagging of his father's debt collectors, there is an entirely different game played in his house. But frankly, I would pity the actor to even show up on screen to share it with Cemcir, not only for his brilliant performance but the power that the character he plays has on the film. That three dimensional persona never fails to amaze us, from his half crooked smile to his ideologies, his character is peeled off layer by layer. And clearly the makers were most euphoric about him, the way other characters speak about his great deeds and how he is so devoted to his work (in the final act, when his son comes to visit him, he still is keeping an eye on his students) despite of being flawed, just makes him more and more rich. There is a lot to listen and lot to ponder about, but as it was intended, the equation of a father and a son will melt you down in the end and to pull off that scene after implementing the fact that Demirkol leaves him without any help lying on the ground, has got to be the biggest development of the film. The Wild Pear Tree is every bit of wild as it has right to be.

    The Old Boy And The Young Man. Ahlat Agaci Bilge Ceylan's making of a book is as meticulous as it can get, throbbing arguments that never crosses the line to be a preaching-to-the-choir tone, this drama is more horror than it claims to be. And similar to the summary of the plot- a son returns hometown after graduation and gets sucked into the sleazy schemes of his gambling father- the first act of the film can arguably considered as a bluff. And the journey of surprising us in each steps after the first act, that it promises to deliver us consistently, has its own cathartic release. But mind you, this game is played subconsciously with us, while the real drama on the screen comes like Rosefeldt's Manifesto- of course without sounding like a pretentious robotic monologue. I would consider this as writers major win among all the others. The writers always had in mind to go deep into hardcore debates of world politics, life changing inspirations and seduce-like negative emotions that grows like cancer as one ages. And their procedure is pure bravura of work, initiating from one of my favorite meetings of our protagonist with his somewhat-like-an-old-lover, the film deals with the social issues that is justified and well crafted out in narration since there was a ticking clock behind them. Cut to another nail-biting argument with an established writer, breaking the wall of celebrity and fan equation, the heating conversation is used as the primary weapon to start initiating on fabricating the other side of our lead character; this is the turning point of the film. Followed by another major discussion of probably everything, among his friends, the writers calls it a day on the preaching note as the viewers are left both cheated and challenged at the brisk of their seat. While our so called hero struggles with the rest of the world like such, along with the nagging of his father's debt collectors, there is an entirely different game played in his house. But frankly, I would pity the actor to even show up on screen to share it with Cemcir, not only for his brilliant performance but the power that the character he plays has on the film. That three dimensional persona never fails to amaze us, from his half crooked smile to his ideologies, his character is peeled off layer by layer. And clearly the makers were most euphoric about him, the way other characters speak about his great deeds and how he is so devoted to his work (in the final act, when his son comes to visit him, he still is keeping an eye on his students) despite of being flawed, just makes him more and more rich. There is a lot to listen and lot to ponder about, but as it was intended, the equation of a father and a son will melt you down in the end and to pull off that scene after implementing the fact that Demirkol leaves him without any help lying on the ground, has got to be the biggest development of the film. The Wild Pear Tree is every bit of wild as it has right to be.