Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez: Season 1 (2020)


Season 1
Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez

Critics Consensus

Though it can't help but feel a little incomplete given the circumstances, The Killer Inside crafts a compelling overview of a series of tragic events.

73%

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 11

82%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 132
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Episodes

1
Air date: Jan 15, 2020
2
Air date: Jan 15, 2020
3
Air date: Jan 15, 2020

Tv Season Info

News & Interviews for Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez: Season 1

Critic Reviews for Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez Season 1

All Critics (11) | Top Critics (6)

The finest video documentary yet on the Hernandez tragedy, "Killer Inside" is richly enhanced by archival footage.

Jan 15, 2020 | Full Review…

The most illuminating wrinkle in "Killer Inside" involves having access to audio of phone calls Hernandez made from prison, providing modest insight about his post-arrest state of mind and relationships with those closest to him.

Jan 15, 2020 | Full Review…
Top Critic

"Killer Inside" puts a finer point on how living in the closet could have contributed to Hernandez's volatile mental state... But perhaps more captivatingly, "Killer Inside" takes an objective look at chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

Jan 16, 2020 | Full Review…

Killer feels padded and repetitive, overlong and confusingly told.

Jan 24, 2020 | Full Review…

Netflix's new docuseries Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez is wildly informative and entertaining, but it missed the mark.

Jan 24, 2020 | Full Review…
Top Critic

Compelling and rather comprehensive.

Jan 27, 2020 | Full Review…

There are a lot of layers here, and a documentary series focusing on Hernandez's life and crimes could have taken a deep dive into any one of them with effective results. But Killer Inside opts for a more salacious approach.

Feb 19, 2020 | Full Review…

Killer Inside is the most comprehensive account of Aaron Hernandez yet, and a fascinating portrait of an impossible person.

Jan 15, 2020 | Full Review…

Killer Inside is a fully immersive look into not only the murder of Odin Lloyd but the world of sports, toxic male behavior, and the life-altering dangers of a sport that so many people idolize.

Jan 16, 2020 | Rating: 4/5 | Full Review…

The only truly relevant talking-head interviews are with Hernandez's high school-football teammates, Stephen Ziogas and Dennis Sansoucie.

Jan 19, 2020 | Rating: B- | Full Review…

Through a wealth of trial footage, archival news broadcasts, new interviews and prison phone conversations, Killer Inside persuasively contends that Hernandez was the byproduct of a perfect storm of negative developments.

Jan 15, 2020 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Killer Inside: The Mind of Aaron Hernandez: Season 1

  • 26m ago
    Muy buen documental sobre la vida y crímenes de Hernández, hijo de puertorriqueño machista, jugador superestrella de la NFL, y con muchas, muchas cosas por detrás que, aparentemente, lo conllevaron a terminar su vida de la peor forma.
  • Feb 16, 2020
    Suprised how well it kept my attention considering that the ending was already clear. Footage, the phone calls and interview style really gave this documentary a special feeling.
  • Feb 15, 2020
    Compelling watch from start to finish. Friends and associates of Hernandez reveal details of his private life that may account for his erratic behavior.
  • Feb 07, 2020
    Shockeante, impactante... Triste historia...
  • Feb 01, 2020
    The aaron hernandez documentary was excellent (until the conclusion). Another case of dangerous behavior from the CTE brain disease caused by football. I can't believe they, the directors, didn't really make that point at the end, they could have, but they ended with a few football players that are in denial of cte, what a stupid choice!
  • Feb 01, 2020
    I watched the first episode when tired but refused to go to bed until I had finished the three parts. Brilliant, fascinating, disturbing, interesting and really well produced. Amazing story fantastically told.
  • Jan 29, 2020
    In the past I have been a fan of the true crime documentaries Netflix has put together, finding that they manage to tell a balanced story from both sides and allow the viewer to watch without too much narrator bias. That was not the case with this documentary. If you told me the prosecution had put the documentary together, I would believe you. Instead of citing experts in various fields, the documentary is largely made up of the opinion of journalists, people involved in the cases against Hernandez, and those from his life willing to talk. Mostly, I'm disappointed in Netflix for taking what seems to be the media-decided story and running with only that - I found it close-minded and short-sighted. This is not your average serial killer/monster story where we talk about psychopathy, childhood trauma, abuse spanning decades. There was no hint of Hernandez being an "evil" person, an abuser with no connection to emotion or getting some kind of pleasure from causing others pain. This is an interesting, multi-faceted story with so much potential and such poignant topics like the oppression of sexuality (especially in toxic masculine environments) and the physical damage he was pushed into in the NFL. Hernandez was a huge figure in the US and therefore someone that has attention that could be used positively to have important discussions surrounding so many issues - his race, his community and the drug-fuelled criminal world he had associations with, his family life/childhood (and apparent sexual abuse), his sexuality, the effects of fame and the world he was put in so young playing college football and then NFL, the lack of mentorship or guidance, the longterm effects of drug use, a more detailed discussion of CTE and physical injury. Why, when discussing a man who has a history of sexual and romantic relationships with both men and women, is he immediately labelled as a closeted homosexual in 2020? Only once, towards the end, was another word even used (bisexual) - it shows an appalling ongoing lack of understanding/ability to discuss the issue, and also a deep lack of respect to the people in his life (e.g. his fiancé, his childhood friend). Why was the abusive household he grew up in and the lack of any leadership in his life after the loss of his father barely mentioned? And the effects of longterm, significant drug use (like marijuana) on a young, growing person never mentioned (paranoia for goodness sake)? Aside from the last short piece of the third part of the documentary, where was the discussion about the college football/NFL community, taking in young men still developing, drugging them, pushing them into physical trauma they'll never recover from (like CTE), not offering mentorship or guidance despite signs someone is struggling, cleaning up messes with the law with no consequences/repercussions to learn from, etc. etc. etc.? Where was any investigation into motive, which was never established or thought about in depth in any way? Okay, crimes were committed, and whether or not Hernandez is guilty of the crimes he is accused of requires exploration and discussion and is important (as are the victims), but surely that discussion has to include all the rest of it to be considered balanced and well considered? If we can turn to the likes of Ted Bundy and consider all of his facets, consult experts, have a comprehensive discussion about the crimes, the background, the environment, the era, the situation, I cannot understand how all of this can be so blatantly disregarded in Hernandez's case. There is a huge story here, but I don't think this documentary does it justice - I don't believe it does the people who lost their lives to murder any justice, and I don't believe it does the man who took his own life any justice. There was so much potential for a lot to be done here and instead they toed the media and NFL company line. This was a shame and a big disappointment coming from Netflix, and despite good production quality, left me extremely angry.
  • Jan 25, 2020
    Only three episodes so it was easy to binge. It revealed details that I did not know before. Interesting to see how a mind of a killer works.
  • Jan 24, 2020
    A very binge-worthy limited series on Netflix. Very intriguing, every episode had you wanting more. Not only did it take a look in the mind of a killer but it shed some light on the impacts heavy brain trauma has on football players.
  • Jan 24, 2020
    The doc was interesting and I learned a lot about him, I think they did a good job with balancing all the different theories for why he would do what he did. Every main theory got its time in the light. The problems I had though was that it sometimes felt choppy, especially in the first episode. But the worst part was the gay stuff. It was all speculation and a lot of it felt irrelevant to what was happening. The had brought in a former NFL player who was gay but used his experience to speculate on how Hernandez felt. They also had his former high school QB on that he was in a secret relationship with, but none of it felt relevant, I did not see the connection to the killings. I also felt that the guy and his dad were not all authentic and wanted attention, but honestly I don't no why I felt that way, I just didn't trust them. I did like all the phone calls and such, very interesting. The CTE part I think was well done. They showed multiple diff opinions on the situation and I think it is safe to say that suisides in the NFL are not caused by CTE. There are pry over 10000+ people alive that were once on a NFL, at least, practice squad and only like 5 of them have killed them self's in the last 20 years

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