The Blacklist: Season 1 (2013 - 2014)

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Critic Consensus: James Spader is riveting as a criminal-turned-informant, and his presence goes a long way toward making this twisty but occasionally implausible crime procedural compelling.

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Episodes

1
Air date: Sep 23, 2013
2
Air date: Sep 30, 2013
3
Air date: Oct 7, 2013
4
Air date: Oct 14, 2013
5
Air date: Oct 21, 2013
6
Air date: Oct 28, 2013
7
Air date: Nov 4, 2013
8
Air date: Nov 11, 2013
9
Air date: Nov 25, 2013
10
Air date: Dec 2, 2013
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The Blacklist: Season 1 Photos

Tv Season Info

Series 1 sees our introduction to former government agent turned criminal Raymond Reddington who, after turning himself into the FBI, says that he will help them capture some of the world's most dangerous criminals. However, he will only talk to one agent, Elizabeth Keen and as the series progresses we slowly get hints of why this might be while simultaneously following the FBI's progress in catching the criminals Reddington is pointing his finger at.

Cast

James Spader
as Raymond "Red" Reddington
Megan Boone
as Elizabeth Keen
Ryan Eggold
as Tom Keen
Diego Klattenhoff
as Donald Ressler
Harry Lennix
as Harold Cooper
Parminder Nagra
as Meera Malik
Ilfenesh Hadera
as Jennifer Palmer
Ritchie Coster
as Anslo Garrick
Isabella Rossellini
as Floriana Campo
Jennifer Ehle
as Madeline Pratt
Chin Han
as Wujing
Robert Sean Leonard
as Frederick Barnes
Ryan O'Nan
as The Alchemist
Linus Roache
as The Kingmaker
Alan Alda
as Mr. Fitch
Hoon Lee
as Mako Tanida
Frank Whaley
as Karl Hoffman
Campbell Scott
as Owen Mallory
Dianne Wiest
as Ruth Kipling
Robert Knepper
as The Courier
Margarita Levieva
as Gina Zanetakos
Justin Kirk
as Nathaniel Wolff
Damian Young
as The Undertaker
Aja Naomi King
as Elisa Rubin
Pat Squire
as Louise Hoffman
Amir Arison
as Aram Mojtabai
Will Denton
as Harrison Lee
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News & Interviews for The Blacklist: Season 1

Critic Reviews for The Blacklist Season 1

All Critics (57) | Top Critics (26)

Yes, it's a preposterous premise, and Boone as well as the character she plays are in over their heads, but if NBC is willing to spend money to make this formula work, it could have a hit on its hands.

Sep 23, 2013 | Full Review…

It's a fast-paced mystery that's just plain entertaining.

Sep 23, 2013 | Rating: 4/5 | Full Review…

Spader is amusingly smug and hammy, as he manipulates the FBI honchos, Keen, and the criminals who think he's on their team. Even so, there is nothing in the pilot that makes me eager to return.

Sep 23, 2013 | Full Review…

C'mon, producers. Upend the procedural. Let Spader run loose.

Sep 23, 2013 | Rating: B+ | Full Review…
Top Critic

The Blacklist is watchable but patently unbelievable and increasingly unpalatable.

Sep 19, 2013 | Rating: C+ | Full Review…
Top Critic

Portraying a brilliant criminal mastermind who opens the drama by turning himself in to the FBI, demanding the presence of a specific rookie agent, he (Spader) is effortlessly captivating.

Sep 6, 2013 | Full Review…

Blacklist is the more purely and criminally enjoyable of the night's new melodramas, largely because James Spader is so good at being playfully bad.

Dec 7, 2018 | Full Review…

A lot of the snazzy action and spiffy pacing may be a cover-up for subpar writing, but the pilot kept things entertaining enough that I'd like to see the second episode. Hopefully it will clear up a few things.

Dec 7, 2018 | Full Review…

The Blacklist, a slick and surprisingly brutal spies-and-black-ops drama that speeds along blithely without an original thought in its head.

Jul 22, 2018 | Full Review…

The Blacklist is mysterious and compelling without being too over the top and complicated.

May 7, 2018 | Rating: 4.3/5 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for The Blacklist: Season 1

JoshG

Super Reviewer

Marc-AndréB

Super Reviewer

The only reason to watch this is to see James Spader act circles around the weird wig girl.

JulieB

Super Reviewer

The Blacklist is the wildly innovative new crime drama that took network television by storm four seasons ago. The show did so well in the ratings in fact, that Netflix shelled out a ton for the exclusive streaming rights, but was it a good investment, lets find out. Raymond Reddington (James Spader) is number one on the FBI's most wanted list. There isn't a crime that this former government agent hasn't committed, so everyone is shocked, when after years on the run, he turns himself in under the condition that he speak with Elizabeth Keen (Megan Boone), an agent who just started working at the FBI, that very day. Eventually Reddington comes to an understanding, that he will provide information about the worst criminals out there, from what he calls his blacklist, but he will only do this for Agent Keen. On the surface this show is ingenious and was originally very addictive. The writers of this show have a way of developing the bad guy that would put Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to shame. Some of these guys have committed acts and exhibit personalities like you have never seen, but they all fail in comparison to Red. The show is extremely addicting, but it is somewhat narrowly focused for a continuous show. What I mean by this, is that the show features continuously running story lines and you have to see every episode to keep up, but these are such a small piece of each episode, that the series almost plays as though it were episonic. Some of these story lines run in circles and drag out throughout entire seasons, long after the audience has figured them out, as a viewer that can be quite frustrating. All that aside, James Spader is the star and he is as good as he has ever been. Most actors come across their career defining roles early on, and its somewhat unusual for someone to find the character they will forever be associated with, after they've been doing this for decades, but much like with Anthony Hopkins and Hannibal Lechter, James Spader has found his role. Spader will be forever known as Red and for good reason. The bottom line, sometimes the story lines are frustrating, but James Spader is as good as it gets, particularly on a network show. The writing isn't always amazing, but the character development for the Blacklist is top notch. This show is unusual in that it's more about the personalities than it is about the actual stories, but that really is the point isn't it, something different?

ToddS

Super Reviewer

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