The Bob Newhart Show: Season 3 (1974 - 1975)


Season 3
The Bob Newhart Show

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Episodes

Air date: Sep 14, 1974

Filmed as the second episode of The Bob Newhart Show's third season, "Big Brother Is Watching" was telecast as the season opener on September 14, 1974. Bob has done his best to resign himself to the romance between his sister, Ellen, and his next-door neighbor, Howard Borden. But even Bob's calm, equitable demeanor is shattered when Ellen decides to move in with Howard sans benefit of clergy. "Big Brother Is Watching" was written by Charlotte Brown.

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Air date: Sep 21, 1974

Filmed as the opening episode of The Bob Newhart Show's third season, "The Battle of the Groups" ended up as the season's second installment, on September 21, 1974. Stuck with two contentious therapy groups, Bob does not relish the notion of taking both groups to a mountain retreat for a marathon therapy session. He should have exercised his better judgment: The weekend turns out to be a cacophonous symphony of complaints, bruised feelings, and teeth-gritting "conversations" between Bob and Emily. Among the supporting players is future Hill Street Blues star Dan Travanty as Mr. Gianelli. "The Battle of the Groups" was written by Tom Patchett and Jay Tarses.

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Air date: Sep 28, 1974

Jerry tries to create a co-op with all the other doctors in the professional building. Under Jerry's master plan, the various medicos will treat each other for free. When the scheme inevitably explodes in Jerry's face, Bob finds himself saddled with an all-doctor therapy group -- for free, of course. Octogenerian actress Merie Earle makes one of her frequent appearances as Bob's doddering patient, Mrs. Loomis. Written by Coleman Mitchell and Geoffrey Neigher, "The Great Timpau Medical Arts Co-op Experiment" first aired on September 28, 1974.

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Air date: Oct 6, 1974

Bob and Emily have decided upon a trial separation, but not for the usual reason. Working on her Master's degree, Emily takes up residence in school, while Bob stays home relishing a bit of much needed peace and quiet. Despite the couple's protestations, however, the Hartleys' friends are convinced that the marriage is on the rocks. Occasional series writer Carl Gottlieb appears as Kuberski, while Richard Stahl is cast as the bellboy, and Katherine Ish plays Mrs. Helnsohn. Scripted by Tom Patchett and Jay Tarses from a story by Bob Garland, "The Separation Story" originally aired on October 5, 1974.

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Air date: Oct 12, 1974

Howard is worried that his son, Howie, will not accept Ellen as his new mother. In his usual bumbling fashion, Howard does a "Vertigo," attempting to mold Ellen into a perfect parent. Despite Howard's concerted efforts, Howie seems to take an automatic dislike to Ellen. Bob, as usual, is stuck in the middle of the fray. Future Three's Company star John Ritter appears as Dave. Written by Charlotte Brown, "Sorry, Wrong Mother" initially aired on October 12, 1974.

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Air date: Oct 19, 1974

In addition to his usual duties, Bob takes on a job as staff psychiatrist for a major Chicago insurance company. Bolstered by a huge salary and better working conditions, Bob performs his job well -- all too well, in fact. John Anderson guest-stars as Colton, with Edward Winter as Wes Greenfield, Jerry Fogel as Paul Hollander, and Mary Robin Redd as Susan Wick. Originally telecast on October 19, 1974, "The Gray Flannel Shrink" was written by Jerry Mayer.

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Air date: Oct 26, 1974

Shirley O'Hara makes a return appearance as vague-minded receptionist Debbie. Hired by Jerry as a temp while Carol is on vacation, Debbie drives everyone to distraction with her incessant ineptitude. Bob would like to say something about the problem, but Debbie is just so darned nice. Also in the cast are Maxine Stuart as Mrs. Chaney and Paula Victor as Stella. Written by Tom Patchett and Jay Tarses, "Dr. Ryan's Express" first aired on October 26, 1974.

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Air date: Nov 2, 1974

Attempting to practice what he preaches to his therapy group, Bob goes on an "honesty" kick. His efforts to tell all the truth all the time has a decidedly negative effect on the guests at the Hartleys' dinner party. Lawrence Pressman and Rose Gregorio make guest appearances as Ed and Janet Hoffman. Written by John Rappaport, "Brutally Yours, Bob Hartley" made its first network appearance on November 2, 1974.

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Air date: Nov 9, 1974

Bob's ego is given quite a boost when he is invited to write a chapter for a fellow psychologist's book. But his euphoria is short-lived; as published, the article has been heavily edited and rewritten. As a result, Bob is reluctant to attend a long-anticipated psychologist's convention in Hawaii, terrified that his colleagues will be able to "read" his state of mind on the spot. Future Laverne and Shirley co-star David L. Lander is seen as Milt; other cast members included Delores Sutton as Madeline Kalisher, Jerome Cuardino as Dr. Kalisher, and Bobby Ramsen as Dr. Rimmer. Written by Coleman Mitchell and Geoffrey Neigher, "Ship of Shrinks" originally aired on November 9, 1974.

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Air date: Nov 16, 1974

Carol's new fiancé, Don Felzer (Richard Schaal), is, for want of a better word, weird. Not only is he an unpublished poet (and not without reason), and without a job, but he also has bad feet. But while love is blind, Carol's friends and associates are not, and all of them hope that she'll come to her senses before it's too late. Written by Jerry Mayer, "Life Is a Hamburger" was originally broadcast on November 16, 1974 -- hanging on by its fingernails opposite the first network airing of The Godfather.

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