The Bob Newhart Show: Season 6 (1977 - 1978)


Season 6
The Bob Newhart Show

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Episodes

Air date: Sep 24, 1977

The fifth season of The Bob Newhart Show ended on March 19, 1977, with the news that Emily Hartley was pregnant. This somewhat significant plot point was conveniently forgotten when the series launched its sixth season on September 24, 1977. Written by Glen and Les Charles, the opening episode, "Bob's Change of Life," found the Hartleys moving into a new apartment. This is but one of many mid-life crises which led Bob to indulge in a few intense sessions of self-analysis. The supporting cast includes Martha Scott as Bob's mother and Charles Thomas Murphy as George Simmons.

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Air date: Oct 1, 1977

Volunteering his services, Bob heads to the local slammer to counsel five men about to be paroled. His efforts to reach out to these lost souls is stymied by the most outspoken of the cons, who refers to Bob as a "suit that's fat-mouthin'." Trouble is, Bob is in complete agreement. Taurean Blacque, Allen Case, Ric Mancini, Wyatt Johnson, and Bert Rosario are cast respectively as Arthur Tatum, Steve Kopelson, Al Brolio, Richard Hawkins, and Reubin Ortiz, while H.B. Haggerty makes an appearance as "The Hammer." Written by Ziggy Steinberg, "Ex-Con Job" first aired on October 1, 1977; it was followed in January of 1978 by a sequel of sorts, "Son of Ex-Con Job."

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Air date: Oct 8, 1977

Two separate plot strands are loosely entwined in this episode. At the office, Bob consuls a ventriloquist named Danny James (Sam Kwasman), whose dummy wants to break up the act. And on the domestic front, Jerry is terrified of being dumped by his "perfect" girlfriend, Jackie Windsor (Hope Alexander-Willis). Also in the cast are Roger Etienne as the waiter, Sondra Theodore as Girl #1, and Jordan Michaels as Girl #2. First telecast on October 8, 1977, "A Jackie Story" was written by Lloyd Garver.

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Air date: Oct 15, 1977

With the help of Bob and a bottle, henpecked Mr. Petersen (John Fiedler) stands up to his wife. The consequences are enormous, not only for the Petersens, but also for Bob. Toni Lamond appears as the much-discussed but seldom-seen Doris Petersen, while Larry Goldman is cast as the cop. Scripted by Glen and Les Charles and directed by the series' comedy consultant, Dick Martin, "Who Was That Masked Man?" first aired on October 15, 1977.

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Air date: Oct 22, 1977

Bob's prickly patient, Mr. Carlin, is given yet another reason to be neurotic; a woman from his past has slapped him with a paternity suit. But upon meeting his "son" for the first time, Carlin hasn't the heart to tell the boy that the suit is a phony. Meanwhile, Bob has troubles of his own with a recalcitrant telephone paging service. Future WKRP in Cincinnati co-star Loni Anderson appears as "wronged woman" Leslie Greeley, Sparky Marcus plays Billy, and occasional Star Trek supporting player Mark Lenard is seen as Earl S. Plummer. Written by Andrew Smith, "Carlin's New Suit" originally aired on October 22, 1977.

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Air date: Oct 29, 1977

Needing a long-overdue break, Bob impulsively decides to spend a week in New Orleans. This uncharacteristic kicking over of traces has a devastating effect on Bob's regular patients. Richard Stahl appears as Mel, while Bud, Rob, and Pam Kenneally are seen as the Swerdlow family. Written by Kathy Donnell and Madeline Dimaggio, the lyrically titled "A Day in the Life" first aired on October 29, 1977.

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Air date: Nov 12, 1977

Howard is even more upset than usual; his son, Howie, has announced his intention to quit school and become a comedian. That's quite a quantum leap for a kid who hasn't even reached his teens yet, and Howard hopes that he -- or Bob -- will be able to talk him out of it. Bobby Ramsen, who made a brace of fifth-season appearances as Johnny Carson Jr., is here cast as comedy teacher Mickey Melnick. Written by David Lloyd, "My Son, the Comedian" originally aired on November 12, 1977.

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Air date: Nov 19, 1977

Hoping to lighten his workload, Bob interviews several candidates for the job of his assistant. When his efforts fail to yield fruit (most of the candidates, alas, are unable to diagnose a hangnail, much less a neurosis), Bob turns to his former college professor, Alan Dreesen (guest star Ralph Bellamy), who has volunteered for the job. Not unexpectedly, Bob lives to regret taking Dr. Dreesen into his practice. First telecast on November 19, 1977, "You're Fired, Mr. Chips" was written by Lloyd Garver.

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Air date: Nov 26, 1977

Saddled with a close-mouthed patient named Twillmer (Richard Libertini), Bob encourages the man to open up and "let it all out." Unfortunately, Twillmer reveals that he has embezzled an enormous sum of money -- and Bob is bound by his doctor-patient confidentiality oath to keep mum about this little indiscretion. Others in the cast include Frank Maxwell as Sgt. O'Conner and J. Jay Saunders as Williams. Written by Earl Pomerantz, "Shallow Throat" first aired on November 26, 1977.

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Air date: Dec 3, 1977

Mildred Natwick guest stars as the Hartley's next-door neighbor, Grace Dubois, who has retreated into her own little fantasy world. When Grace's relatives move to have her shipped to a nursing home, Emily intervenes. First telecast on December 3, 1977, this was one of several sixth-season Bob Newhart Show episodes to do without the services of star Newhart, who was unhappy with recent CBS scheduling decisions. "A Girl in Her Twenties" was written by Laura Levine.

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