The Liberator: Season 1 (2020)


Season 1
The Liberator

Critics Consensus

The Liberator's eccentric animation gives it some creative gloss, but clichéd storytelling and stock characters keep this World War II tale from being wholly salute-worthy.

69%

TOMATOMETER

Critic Ratings: 13

72%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 96

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Episodes

Air date: Nov 11, 2020

The Thunderbirds' time in Salerno hits some bumps, especially for Capt. Sparks, whose early days as the unit's commander are explored.

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Air date: Nov 11, 2020

With their flank exposed, the Thunderbirds face a standoff with the Germans while defending Anzio; Capt. Sparks faces disciplinary action.

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Air date: Nov 11, 2020

A rebuilt E Company ships off to France; at the start, it's a welcome break until it brings another impossible mission; Capt. Sparks receives high honors.

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Air date: Nov 11, 2020

As the Allies close in on German forces, the Thunderbirds bear witness to the atrocities of the enemy as well as their fellow troops.

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The Liberator: Season 1 Videos

The Liberator: Season 1 Photos

Tv Season Info

Cast & Crew

Bradley James
Felix Sparks

Voice
Jose Miguel Vasquez
Cpl. Able Gomez

Voice
Martin Sensmeier
Sgt. Samuel Coldfoot

Voice
Billy Breed
Pvt. Vacarro

Voice
Bryan Hibbard
Cpl. Hallowell

Voice
Jeb Stuart
Executive Producer
Robert Shaye
Executive Producer
Michael Lynne
Executive Producer
Sarah Victor
Executive Producer
L.C. Crowley
Executive Producer
Brandon Barr
Executive Producer
Barry Jossen
Executive Producer
Greg Jonkajtys
Executive Producer
Mark Aspen
Executive Producer
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News & Interviews for The Liberator: Season 1

Critic Reviews for The Liberator: Season 1

Audience Reviews for The Liberator: Season 1

  • Feb 23, 2022
    I loved it. If you can get past the, admittedly jarring, 'animation', the story told is one that is both heroic and devastating. Yes, it uses some old war story tropes and yes, it may not be completely accurate to historical events but it still manages to communicate a sense of the horror, brutality, friendship and grief of war. What really carried the series for me, though, was the stunning performances by the leading cast, particularly Bradley James who communicates Felix Sparks' experience so well that one can come to feel like they are seeing all the events as though through his eyes. He draws you into Sparks' life so well that I may go back and rewatch the whole series immediately.
  • Nov 11, 2021
    Jerky animation aside, the script is just not up to scratch. Very unsubtle in its messaging and the acting sounds wooden. Only watched half an hour.
  • Aug 12, 2021
    This movie is based on the book by Alex Kershaw which follows the experiences of Lt. Col. Felix Sparks of the U.S. Army's Forty-Fifth Division, known as the Thunderbirds. As documented in an article by Todd South of the Federal Times, the book was written from countless interviews Mr. Kershaw had with Felix Sparks shortly before his death in 2007. If you are looking for historical non-fiction in this movie, then look elsewhere because the book it was based upon has numerous very relevant factual inaccuracies. That is because many of the stories Sparks told to Kershaw simply did not happen. I am a researcher, WW II history buff, attorney and the author of The Final Battle - An Untold Story of WW II's Forty-Second Rainbow Division. My book has more than 100 official resources in its bibliography, and the history of the Rainbow and Thunderbird Divisions intersect at relevant times during the timeframe and scene portrayals of this movie, especially those involving the Dachau Concentration Camp. Concerning examples of relevant inaccuracies; Lt. Col. Sparks claims that he and his unit of the 45th single handedly captured and liberated the Dachau concentration camp. This belies historical fact. It simply never happened. It was the Forty-Second Division (the Rainbow) that liberated Dachau. Besides the numerous books and reference materials (e.g. Lt. Hugh Daly, The Combat History of the Rainbow Div., The Army Navy Publishing 1946; Sam Dann, Dachau 29 April 1945, Texas Tech Univ. Press 1998; The Rainbow Reveille dated May 11, 1945, published by the US Army and many others) documenting the facts surrounding the events at Dachau supporting this fact, the U.S. Army's Center of Military History credits the Rainbow Division with the camp's liberation and not the Thunderbirds. Of course, that is also why the plaque at the present day Dachau camp dedicates its liberation to the Rainbow Division. The fact is that the Thunderbirds, as an entire division, just not Sparks' unit, captured an adjacent Waffen SS garrison, unrelated to the Dachau concentration camp, and committed war crimes within that garrison. However, Sparks, in the Kershaw book, doesn't even mention that the Waffen SS garrison existed, and, of course, the movie does not have any scenes concerning this garrison, nor does it have any scenes or mention of the Rainbow Division liberating the concentration camp. To expand the Spark's fantasies, he describes what he calls "The Linden Incident." This was shown as a critical scene in the movie. The facts are that Brig. Gen. Linden of the Rainbow Division, and his small contingent, which included a news reporter, actually accepted the surrender of the Dachau concentration camp from SS Lt. Wicker. That is the official historical record and there are numerous documents and pictures of this account as well. However, this official account was not told by Sparks, and thus, does not appear in the Kershaw book and subsequent movie. What Sparks describes is pure made up fiction which not only belies the facts, it belies logic. In the Sparks' "Linden Incident," he claims he saw Gen. Linden outside the Dachau camp and Lt. Col. Sparks went over to the General and ordered him out of the area at gun point. If Sparks had done what he described, he would have been immediately arrested and later court marshaled. And if it happened, of course the news reporter would have reported the incident, and an official Army after action report would have also documented the interaction. There were no news or official records of such an incident, because it never happened. This is just a couple examples of the relevant inaccuracies in the movie based upon the book. My feeling is that if a publisher is going to hold out a book as based on true events, then that book should have been fact checked and not published as non-fiction solely based upon the unverified stories of a single man, AND moreover, a movie studio producing a movie they claim as factual has a responsibility to fact check the sources from which they base the movie. Both the book, The Liberator, and the movie failed concerning historical accuracy, and the publishing of such historical inaccuracies does a disservice to the men who served in both the Thunderbird and Rainbow Divisions of WW II.
  • Jun 23, 2021
    esta temporada es genial totamente fantastico digno de un homenaje
  • Feb 14, 2021
    This flat story driven war mini series that shouldn't have been made the way it was. It's a little cliche and noticed that it's more focused on its spectacle aspect instead of the actual storytelling. War movies shouldn't be artsy, it should be raw,emotional, captivating and real. With emotions not Instagram filters.
  • Dec 12, 2020
    Honestly, the storyline was decent but the animation style plus the live-action combination didn't really work for me, it kind of felt in the end you just got the worst of both worlds and that really kept me from diving into the storyline.
  • Dec 01, 2020
    This Netflix miniseries was very good. Bradley James, Martin Sensmeier, Taylor James, Jose Miguel Vasquez, Matt Mercutio, and the rest of the cast did a spectacular job in this miniseries. This true story about the 157th Infantry Division that fought in WW2 was intense, heroic, and dramatic. It's about fighting together to achieve a common goal no matter how different you look from others. If you're a Netflix member, you have to check out this miniseries. It's an absolute must see.
  • Nov 27, 2020
    those who liked band of brothers will love this. a great show.
  • Nov 20, 2020
    After seeing some reviews indicating that this show was somehow not doing the vets justice, I had to leave one that respectfully disagrees. No, you should not expect high def explosives, realistic gore, or even particularly immersive combat. Yes, it is a hybrid cartoon/live action, which might look more like Bugs Bunny than Band of Brothers at times. What you can expect from this series is an incredible depiction of a young leader making his way up the ranks as a result of death, attrition and near impossible tactical decisions. The military aspects were accurate and extremely well researched. You get a sample of proper patrol formations, the ugliness of real tactics being applied and HQs being denied the use of heat because other troops are freezing on the frontlines. These writers did not skimp on the details - they did thier research. The story is a balance of inspiring and sickening. There are many combat shows and films out there that intend to tribute vets. Many of them opt for the bottomless magazine and hot hunky actors. This forgos the above and is one of the most plausible and moving that I have ever seen in terms of military depiction. I can't think of a better tribute.
  • Nov 19, 2020
    I was optimistic about this series, but I'm divided on it. For me, the Trioscope technique is not the main problem. I did enough reading about the technique prior to watching the show to understand it. I also respect people creating new ideas for screen entertainment. What really weakens this series is the writing. The drama and dialogue doesn't flow smoothly and you don't fully connect with the characters. The writers only seem to scratch the surface with the characterisation and lines feel like triggered dialogue from within a video game, rather than feeling like natural conversation, especially with Sparks. I know the actor playing Felix Sparks is British, and it feels like he's trying too hard to sound right in an American accent, rather than getting the drama and emotion across, to the point of sounding slightly unnatural so it distracted me from what he was actually saying. Also, for a show that tried to market itself on the racial element, they focus far too little on those characters. I really wanted to learn more about the Native American & Latinx soldiers, but they weren't given enough material. A missed opportunity to tell the stories of people Hollywood usually & unfairly ignores. In terms of the background animation added after filming, one thing that did bug me was the lack of weight & gravity when you have a shot from above of vehicles or soldiers passing over ground or through water. It's as if they are gliding across a few inches above it but not making contact with the surface. Also, why is Sparks traveling around without a kit most of the time? He doesn't appear to be carrying anything with him. What soldier would go out into a war zone with nothing on him, as if he's just going to the corner shop to pick up a snack? Surely they could have gotten hold of some US military kit bags from WW2 or made lookalikes just to get the exterior shape to animate over. You also don't get a true sense of expression in Sparks' face. There's a flatness to it - you cannot sense what he's feeling or thinking. He just seems to be strolling through it which is quite unrealistic for a military officer in such an environment, confronted the worst of the Nazi soldiers - the SS. That sense of urgency in life/death scenarios doesn't come through. He looked bit too cocky for the dire situations they were in like the actor was trying to play cool rather than real. I know they were all on sets with no more than blue surfaces and markers, but it is very noticeable that they are not 'feeling' their environment. Actors should be able to make audiences unaware that they just had blue/green screens. There's an unfortunate detachment from the story, and it's not the absence of live-action in the final product. It's in the writing and the actors not having the scope to truly pull the audience into the story or into the souls of the characters. The result is a disconnect that frustrates the audience because you feel blocked from getting into it, as much as you wanted to. As with the vehicles and feet on the surfaces - it's not making contact.

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