Albert Finney

Albert Finney

  • Highest Rated: 100% The Dresser (1983)
  • Lowest Rated: 25% A Good Year (2006)
  • Birthday: May 9, 1936
  • Birthplace: Salford, Greater Manchester, England, UK
  • Throughout his acting career, Albert Finney has impressed critics with his protean ability to step into a role and wear a character's persona no matter the age, nationality, or métier. In stage, film, and television productions over more than 40 years, Finney has portrayed a Polish pope, a Belgian detective, an Irish gangster, a British miser, a gruff American lawyer, a Scottish King, a German religious reformer, and an Roman warrior -- all with convincing authenticity. Finney was born on May 9, 1936, in the working-class town of Salford, Lancashire, England. After graduating from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Arts in 1955, he performed Shakespeare and quickly earned a coveted spot as understudy for the great Laurence Olivier in Shakespeare productions at Stratford-upon-Avon. On one occasion, he stepped into Olivier's shoes to play the lead role in Coriolanus, a play about the downfall of a proud Roman soldier, and won recognition that led to film roles.Finney's upbringing in Lancashire, a region of mills and smokestacks, exposed him to the kind of social injustice and economic hardship that helped prepare him for his role as a nonconformist factory worker in the 1960 film Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, a milestone in the development of British realist cinema. Critics -- who hardly noticed him in the bit-part role he played in his first film, The Entertainer -- universally praised his vibrant performance in Saturday Night. This success earned him the lead role in director Tony Richardson's 1963 film Tom Jones, adapted by screenwriter John Osborne from the Henry Fielding novel of the same name. As the wenching country boy Jones, Finney was a bawdy, rollicking, uproarious success, helping the film win four Academy awards.Rather than abandon live stage drama, Finney continued to pursue it with the National Theatre Company at the Old Vic in London, performing in Shakespeare productions and plays by other authors. He won Tony nominations for Luther and A Day in the Death of Joe Egg, as well as a best actor Oliver for Orphans. When he made his next film in 1967, he starred opposite Audrey Hepburn in Stanley Donen's Two for the Road, a comedy-drama about marital mayhem, and again won high critical praise.If there was a pattern to the types of roles he selected, it was that there was no pattern. For example, after playing a 20th century art enthusiast in 1969's Picasso Summer, he took on the role of a 19th century Dickens character in Scrooge (1970), then played a bickering husband in Alpha Beta (1973), Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot in Murder on the Orient Express (1974), a Napoleon-era Frenchman in The Duellists (1978), a werewolf hunter in Wolfen (1981), and a plastic surgeon/murder suspect in the ludicrous Looker (1981).After winning an Academy award nomination for his performance in 1982's Shoot the Moon, Finney delivered another outstanding performance in Peter Yates' 1983 film The Dresser, which earned five Oscar nominations, including a nomination for Finney as best actor. In the film, Finney plays a boozing Shakespearean actor whose life strangely parallels the tragic life of one of the characters he portrays, King Lear. In 1984, Finney won still another Oscar nomination, as well as a Golden Globe nomination, for his role as a self-defeating alcoholic in director John Huston's Under the Volcano. In the same year, critics praised him highly for his dynamic portrayal of Pope John Paul II in an American TV production.Finney continued to take on diverse and challenging roles in the late 1980s and during the 1990s, primarily in small, independent productions. Among the films that earned him more accolades were the Coen brothers' gangster epic Miller's Crossing (1990) -- for which Finney replaced actor Trey Wilson after his untimely death -- as well as A Man of No Importance (1994), The Browning Version (1995), and Simpatico (1999). Also in 1999, he won the BAFTA TV award for best actor for his role in A Rather English Marriage.

Photos

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Rating

Title

Credit

Box
Office

Year

92% Skyfall Kincade $299.4M 2012
56% The Bourne Legacy Dr. Albert Hirsch $113.2M 2012
No Score Yet Churchill - The Gathering Storm Actor 2012
88% Before the Devil Knows You're Dead Charles $7M 2007
92% The Bourne Ultimatum Dr. Albert Hirsch $227.5M 2007
68% Amazing Grace John Newton $21.2M 2007
25% A Good Year Uncle Henry $7.4M 2006
No Score Yet Tony Palmer's Classic Film of John Osborne and the Gift of Friendship Actor 2006
84% Tim Burton's Corpse Bride Finnis Everglot $53.4M 2005
55% Ocean's Twelve Gaspar La Marque $125.5M 2004
75% Big Fish Senior Ed Bloom $66.3M 2003
83% The Gathering Storm Winston Churchill 2002
No Score Yet Delivering Milo Elmore 2001
92% Traffic Chief of Staff $123.9M 2000
84% Erin Brockovich Ed Masry 2000
25% Simpatico Simms 1999
26% Breakfast of Champions Kilgore Trout 1999
No Score Yet A Rather English Marriage Reggie Cunningham-Jarvis 1998
81% Washington Square Dr. Austin Sloper 1997
50% The Run of the Country Father 1995
78% The Browning Version Andrew Crocker-Harris 1994
86% A Man of No Importance Alfie Byrne 1994
67% Rich in Love Warren Odom 1993
92% The Playboys Constable Brendan Hegarty 1992
91% Miller's Crossing Leo 1990
No Score Yet The Image Jason Cromwell 1990
No Score Yet Green Man Actor 1990
No Score Yet Roger Waters - The Wall Live in Berlin Actor 1990
No Score Yet The Endless Game Alec Hillsden 1989
67% Orphans Harold 1987
71% Under the Volcano Geoffrey Firmin 1984
No Score Yet Pope John Paul II Karol Wojty?a, Pope John Paul II 1984
No Score Yet Observations Under the Volcano Actor 1984
No Score Yet The Biko Inquest Actor Director 1984
100% The Dresser Sir 1983
56% Annie Daddy Warbucks 1982
82% Shoot the Moon George Dunlap 1982
26% Looker Dr. Larry Roberts 1981
75% Wolfen Dewey Wilson 1981
No Score Yet Loophole Mike Daniels 1981
92% The Duellists Fouche 1977
91% Murder on the Orient Express Hercule Poirot 1974
No Score Yet Gumshoe Eddie 1971
75% Scrooge Ebenezer Scrooge 1970
No Score Yet The Picasso Summer George Smith 1969
95% If.... Producer 1968
No Score Yet Charlie Bubbles Charlie Director 1968
83% Two for the Road Mark Wallace 1967
No Score Yet Night Must Fall Danny 1964
No Score Yet The Victors Russian Soldier 1963
85% Tom Jones Tom Jones 1963
92% Saturday Night And Sunday Morning Arthur Seaton 1961
73% The Entertainer Mick Rice 1960

TV

Rating

Title

Credit

Year

No Score Yet Masterpiece
1971-2014
Reggie Cunningham-Jarvis Silas Uncle Silas
  • 2003
  • 2001
  • 1999

QUOTES FROM Albert Finney CHARACTERS

Erin Brockovich
Well, excuse me for not going to Law School.
Ed Masry
Law School? At this point, I'd settle for Charm School.
Arthur Seaton
All I want is a good time. The rest is propaganda.
William Bloom
You know about icebergs, Dad?
Edward Bloom (senior)
Do I? I saw an iceberg once. They were haulin' down it down to Texas for drinkin' water. They didn't count on there bein' a elephant frozen inside. The wooly kind. A mammoth.
William Bloom
Dad!
Edward Bloom (senior)
What?
William Bloom
I'm tryin' to make a metaphor here.
Edward Bloom (senior)
Well, you shouldn't have started with a question, because most people wanna answer questions. You should've started with "the thing about iceberg is"
Sandra Bloom (Senior)
I don't know if you're aware of this, Josephine, but African parrots, in their native homes of the Congo, they only speak French?
Josephine
Really?
Edward Bloom (senior)
You're lucky to get four words out of them in English, but if you were to walk through the jungle, you'd hear them speakin' the most elaborate French. Those parrots talk about everything. Politics, movies, fashion. Everything but religion.
William Bloom
Why not religion, Dad?
Edward Bloom (senior)
It's rude to talk about religion. You never know who you're gonna offend.
William Bloom
Josephine actually went to Congo last year.
Edward Bloom (senior)
Oh, so you know.
Ebenezer Scrooge
I think I'm going to like children.
Ebenezer Scrooge
The trouble with you, Cratchit, is that all you think about is pleasure. Pleasure and spending money.
Ebenezer Scrooge
If I could work my will, Nephew, every idiot who goes about with "Merry Christmas" on his lips would be boiled with his own pudding and buried with a stake of holly through his heart.
Ebenezer Scrooge
It's a poor excuse for picking a man's pocket every 25th of December.
Finis Everglot
Everything will go as planned she will marry
Finis Everglot
Everything will go as planned she will marry.
Edward Bloom (senior)
I was dryin' out.
Joanna Wallace
*a train drives past them, catching them by surprise* Sexy, wasn't it?
Joanna Wallace
Sexy, wasn't it?
Mark Wallace
*sarcastically* You're not frustrated at all.
Mark Wallace
You're not frustrated at all.
Mark Wallace
What kind of people just sit there without a word to say to each other?
Joanna Wallace
Married people.
Mark Wallace
I was waiting for what you wanted! You wanted a boiled egg, not me!
Joanna Wallace
So I suppose Caroline has nothing to do with this?
Mark Wallace
You were the one who wanted a child!
Joanna Wallace
Why don't you wake her up and tell her that?!
Joanna Wallace
Why don't you wake her up and tell her that?
Ed Masry
PG&E is demanding 90. In other words, everybody. Do you understand? This is serious.
Erin Brockovich
And, what, Ed? I'm not serious?
Ed Masry
You're emotional, you're erratic. You say anything, you make this personal, and it isn't.
Erin Brockovich
Not personal? That is my work! My sweat! My time away from my kids! If that's not personal, I don't know what is-- [starts to cough hardly]
Ed Masry
Hey, come on. Come on. Go home. Get well. Because you're no good to me sick. I need you, all right? This case needs you.
Erin Brockovich
Did you tell them that?
Edward Bloom (senior)
You are in for a surprise.
William Bloom
Am I?.
Edward Bloom (senior)
Havin' a kid changes everything. There's burpin', the midnight feedin', and the changin'.
William Bloom
You do any of that?
Edward Bloom (senior)
No. But I hear it's terrible. Then you spent years tryin' to corrupt and mislead this child, fill his head with nonsense, and still it turns out perfectly fine.
William Bloom
You think I'm up for it?
Edward Bloom (senior)
You learned from the best.
Edward Bloom (senior)
I've been nothin' but myself since the day I was born, and if you can't see that it's your fallin', not mine.
Edward Bloom (senior)
Most men, they'll tell you a story straight through. It won't be complicated, but it won't be interestin' either.
Erin Brockovich
How could you take this away from me?
Ed Masry
No one's taking anything, will you let me--
Erin Brockovich
Bullshit! You stuck me in Siberia dictating to some goddamn steno clerk so you could finish this thing without me!
Kincade
Welcome to Scotland
Elmore Dahl
You don't know what life is really like, kid.
Milo
Good. I want to keep it that way. Take me back.
Elmore Dahl
There's no way anyone can teach you about the pleasure of eating.You've got to do it yourself.
Edward Bloom (senior)
It's rude to talk about religion. You never know who you're gonna offend.
Josephine
Can I take you a picture?
Edward Bloom (senior)
Oh, you don't need a picture. Just look up the word "handsome" in the dictionary.
Edward Bloom (senior)
Oh, you don't need a picture. Just look up the word 'handsome' in the dictionary.
Leo
[to Caspar] You haven't bought any license to kill bookies and today I ain't sellin' any. Now take your flunkie and dangle.
Finis Everglot
[Bonejangles creeps up behind Finnis; his eye falls into Finnis' bowl] There's an eye in me soup.
Kincade
So who are we going against?
James Bond
There's no, 'we,' this isn't your fight.
Kincade
Try and stop me you jumped up little shit.
Kincade
What was it you said you did for a living again?
Kincade
Welcome to Scotland!!
Kincade
Welcome to Scotland!
Husband at Tube Station
He's keen to get home
Husband at Tube Station
He's keen to get home.
Kincade
Welcome to Scotland.
Kincade
Welcome to Scotland!
Dr. Albert Hirsch
Welcome to the program.
Jason Bourne
Why did you pick me?
Dr. Albert Hirsch
You really don't remember, do you? We didn't pick you. You picked us. You volunteered. Right here. Right here, even after you were warned.
Ed Masry
In a law firm you may want to re-think your wardrobe a little.
Erin Brockovich
Well as long as I have one ass instead of two I'll wear what I like if that's all right with you. You might want to re-think those ties.
Victoria Everglot
Oh, Hildegarde, what if....what if Victor and I don't....like each other?
Maudeline Everglot
Ha! As if that has anything to do with marriage. Do you suppose your father and I "like" each other?
Victoria Everglot
Surely you must, a little....
Maudeline Everglot
Of course not!
Finis Everglot
Of course not!
Maudeline Everglot
Get those corsets laced properly. I can hear you speak without gasping.
Finis Everglot
Marvelous news, Victoria, there'll be a wedding after all.
Victoria Everglot
You found him?
Maudeline Everglot
Make haste, my dear, our relatives will arrive at any moment. We must have you looking presentable for Lord Barkis.
Victoria Everglot
Lord Barkis?
Maudeline Everglot
He will make a fine husband.
Finis Everglot
Aye. A fortuitous turn of events indeed.
Maudeline Everglot
A far better prospect this time.
Victoria Everglot
But I do not love him. You cannot make me do this!
Finis Everglot
We must.
Victoria Everglot
Please, I beg of you! There must be another way!
Finis Everglot
Without your marriage to Lord Barkis, we shall be forced penniless into the street. We are destitute.
Victoria Everglot
But...Victor....
Maudeline Everglot
Victor Van Dort is gone, child.
Finis Everglot
You shall marry Lord Barkis tomorrow. *with Maudeline* According to plan!
Ed Masry
Do they teach beauty queens how to apologize? Because you suck at it.
Uncle Henry
A man should acknowledge his losses just as gracefully as he celebrate his victories.
Edward Bloom (senior)
Fate has a cruel way to play with us, there is a time when a man must fight. And a moment when you must accept that he lost his destiny, which sailed the boat and that only a fool would ... Actually I've always been a fool
Edward Bloom (senior)
Fate has a cruel way to play with us, there is a time when a man must fight. And a moment when you must accept that he lost his destiny, which sailed the boat and that only a fool would ... Actually I've always been a fool.
Leo
Oh, come on Tommie. You know I don't like to think.
Tom Reagan
Yeah, well think about whether you should start.
Edward Bloom (senior)
(quoting his mother) 'The milkman dropped dead on our front porch'. See, if my momma was bangin' the milkman.
Edward Bloom (senior)
[quoting his mother] The milkman dropped dead on our front porch. See, if my momma was bangin' the milkman.
Edward Bloom (senior)
I was dryin' out.
Edward Bloom (senior)
I was drying out.
Edward Bloom (senior)
There comes a point when any reasonable man will swallow his pride and admit he made a mistake. The truth is... I was never a reasonable man.
Edward Bloom (senior)
They say when you meet the love of your life, time stops, and that's true. What they don't tell you is that when it starts again, it moves extra fast to catch up.
Edward Bloom (senior)
They say when you meet the love of your life, time stops, and that's true. What they don't tell you is that when it starts again, it moves extra fast to catch up.
Josephine
Is this a tall tale?
Edward Bloom (senior)
It's not a short one!