Oskar Werner

Oskar Werner

Highest Rated: 100% Decision Before Dawn (1951)

Lowest Rated: 43% The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968)

Birthday: Nov 13, 1922

Birthplace: Not Available

Universally regarded as one of Western Europe's foremost stage actors, Oskar Werner was 18 years old when he made his stage bow at the Burgtheater in his native Vienna. A lifelong pacifist, Werner did everything he could to avoid conscription in the Axis army during World War II; when he finally was forced into a uniform, he deserted at the earliest opportunity. After the war, Werner resumed his theatrical career, only reluctantly making his first film in 1948; "I am married to the theater, and the films are only my mistress" he would later declare. In 1951, he made his English-language film debut as "Happy," an enigmatic German POW, in 20th Century-Fox's Decision Before Dawn. When Fox reneged on its promise to develop Werner into a Hollywood star, he went back to his true love, the theatre, vowing to only appear in films that intrigued him. In 1955, he essayed the title role in Mozart, and also played a smaller but no less significant part as the student with the scarf in Ophuls' Lola Montes. Then it was back to the stage, culminating with his formation of Theatre Ensemble Oskar Werner in 1959. Werner's definitive screen performance was the romantic intellectual Jules in Francois Truffaut's Jules et Jim (1962), though it was his portrayal of the philosophical Dr. Schumann in Ship of Fools (1965) that earned the actor his only Oscar nomination. His friendship with Truffaut soured after their second collaboration, Fahrenheit 451 (1967); exhibiting profound disillusionment, Truffaut complained (not without justification) that Werner had become a "cold" performer. Oskar Werner died at the age of 62, just before he was scheduled to deliver a lecture at a German drama club.

Highest Rated Movies

Filmography

Movies

Credit
66% Two in the Wave (Deux de la Vague) Actor $28.3K 2010
No Score Yet Interlude Actor 2005
83% Voyage of the Damned Professor Egon Kreisler 1976
43% The Shoes of the Fisherman Fr. David Telemond 1968
81% Fahrenheit 451 Guy Montag 1966
72% Ship of Fools Dr. Schumann 1965
87% The Spy Who Came In from the Cold Fiedler 1965
92% Jules and Jim Jules 1962
No Score Yet Interlude Stefan Zelter 1957
No Score Yet Life and Loves of Mozart Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 1956
82% Lola Montès Student 1955
No Score Yet Der Letzte Akt Captain Wurst 1955
100% Decision Before Dawn Happy 1951
No Score Yet The Angel with the Trumpet Herman Alt 1950
No Score Yet The Wonder Kids Rudi 1950

TV

Credit
No Score Yet Columbo
1968-2003
Van Wyck 1975

QUOTES FROM Oskar Werner CHARACTERS

Clarisse says: One more question.

Montag says: Another one?

Clarisse says: Just a little tiny one.

Montag says: What is it?

Clarisse says: Do you ever read the books you burn?

Montag says: Why should I? First, I’m not interested; second, I’ve better things to do; and third, it is forbidden.

Clarisse says: Of course! Are you happy?

Montag says: What? Of course I’m happy…

Jules says: Not this one, Jim.

Montag says: To learn how to find, one must first learn how to hide.

Clarisse says: Tell me, why do you burn books?

Montag says: What? Well, it's a job like any other. Good work with lots of variety. Monday, we burn Miller; Tuesday, Tolstoy; Wednesday, Walt Whitman; Friday, Faulkner; and Saturday and Sunday, Schopenhauer and Satre. "We burn them to ashes and then burn the ashes." that's our official motto.

Montag says: What? Well, it's a job like any other. Good work with lots of variety. Monday, we burn Miller; Tuesday, Tolstoy, Wednesday, Walt Whitman, Friday, Faulkner; and Saturday and Sunday, Schopenhauer and Satre. 'We burn them to ashes and then burn the ashes.' that's our official motto.

Clarisse says: Is it true that a long time ago firemen used to put out fire and not burn books?

Montag says: Really, your uncle is right. You are light in the head. "Put fires out"? Who told you that?

Montag says: Really, your uncle is right. You are light in the head. 'Put fires out?' Who told you that?

Clarisse says: I don't know. Someone. But is it true?

Montag says: What a strange idea. Houses have always been fireproof.

Clarisse says: Ours isn't.

Montag says: Well, then, it should be condemned one of these days. It has to be destroyed and you will have to move to a house that is fireproof.

Clarisse says: Too bad.

Clarisse says: Tell me, that number you all wear, what's it mean?

Montag says: Oh, fahrenheit 451.

Clarisse says: Why 451 rather than 813 or 121?

Montag says: Fahrenheit 451 is the temperature at which book paper catches fire and starts to burn.

Clarisse says: Even with my eyes closed, I could tell what you do for a job.

Montag says: Because of the smell of kerosene?

Clarisse says: Huh.

Montag says: Quite a scent, isn't it? My wife doesn't like it very much. She says it lingers. I don't mind. I think of it as a... perfume.

Clarisse says: My uncle says I am a veritable well of words.

Montag says: Has this uncle of yours ever warned you never to speak to strangers?

Clarisse says: No. He did say once if anyone asked how old I was to say I was twenty years old and light in the head. They always go together.

Montag says: "Light in the head"?

Montag says: 'Light in the head'?

Clarisse says: Mmm. Loopy. Crazy. Anyway, you don't frighten me.

Captain says: What does Montag do with his day off duty?

Montag says: Not very much, sir. Mow the lawn.

Captain says: And what if the law forbids that?

Montag says: Just watch it grow, sir.

Captain says: Uh-huh. Good.