Fahrenheit 451

1966, Sci-fi, 1h 52m

36 Reviews 25,000+ Ratings

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Movie Info

Adaptation of the Ray Bradbury novel about a future society that has banned all reading material and the job of the firemen is to keep the fires at 451 degrees: the temperature that paper burns. A fireman begins to re-think his job when he meets a book-loving girl.

Cast & Crew

Julie Christie
Linda, Clarisse
Cyril Cusack
The Captain
Jeremy Spenser
Man with the Apple
Alex Scott
Book Person: "The Life of Henry Brulard"
Gillian Lewis
TV Announcer (uncredited)
Ann Bell
Doris (uncredited)
Caroline Hunt
Helen (uncredited)
Anna Palk
Jackie (uncredited)
Denis Gilmore
Book Person: "The Martian Chronicles" (uncredited)
Miriam Brickman
Executive Producer
Michael Dalamar
Associate Producer
Jane C. Nusbaum
Associate Producer
Bernard Herrmann
Original Music
Nicolas Roeg
Cinematographer
Thom Noble
Film Editor
Syd Cain
Production Designer
Tony Walton
Production Designer
Syd Cain
Art Direction
Tony Walton
Costume Designer
Basil Newall
Makeup Artist
Ian Lewis
Production Manager
Tony Walton
Production Supervisor
Bryan Coates
Assistant Director
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Critic Reviews for Fahrenheit 451

Audience Reviews for Fahrenheit 451

  • Dec 21, 2015
    More like a jazz riff on the source material than a note by note translation, Traffaut's version actually adds interesting layers not intended by Bradbury. It's always cool to see how the past imagined the future and this imagination is well layered. For instance all the houses have TV antennas. Its a important feature of Traffaut's vision --- and its wrong technically. Nobody back then saw WIFI coming. On the other hand wall-sized flat screens are a right on the money prediction. On the whole the film is an uneven affair, and Werner's presence is disconcerting, yet as sci-fi it totally works. Its not just about burning books. Its about controlling the masses.
    Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
  • Mar 30, 2012
    Transposed to the screen by Truffaut and with an evoking score by Bernard Herrmann, Bradbury's terrifying vision of a future is a brilliant allegory that remains intelligent and pertinent even today, when books may not be destroyed but are scorned by people.
    Carlos M Super Reviewer
  • Jan 21, 2011
    What has always impressed me about Bradbury's classic is his commitment to post-Enlightenment ideals. This film and Bradbury's novel obviously condemn book-burning. And the film lingers on the burning pages with an almost-overwrought, almost-melodramatic pathos. But it also shows <i>Mein Kampf</i> about to be torched. What Bradbury says is that in accordance with post-Enlightenment philosophy, when people are allowed free access to ideas, invariably the good ideas rise to the top and the bad ones fall. It is only after we trust in the goodness of human perception that we can see the burning of Hilter's work as tragic as the burning of Twain. What I've written so far is only about the source material because that's the only part of this film I liked. We never get to see Montag's journey; he goes from book-burner to reader in the matter of a quick night and a quicker conversation. I normally don't care about set design, but this is a shallow, half-hearted attempt at creating a <i>Stepford Wives</i> future, and we needed a greater commitment to this idea if Truffaut wanted to feature the design so prominently. Finally, I was remarkable unimpressed by Oskar Werner. His command of English was a stark contrast to all the characters around him, and he remained stolid, emotionless, and ineffective throughout most of the film's action. Overall, read the book; don't see the film.
    Jim H Super Reviewer
  • Sep 05, 2010
    This may seem a strange film if you haven't read the book, but if you have you know it's awesome. I really liked the movie.
    Aj V Super Reviewer

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