Alex Heeney

Alex Heeney
Tomatometer-approved critic
Publications: Seventh Row
Critics' Group: Online Film Critics Society

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
94% The Delivered (Fanny Lye Deliver'd) (2019) Thomas Clay's Fanny Lye Deliver'd delivers a smart, complex, central character, in a film that understands the world she must negotiate. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 9, 2021
95% Test Pattern (2021) Ford deftly manages... ambiguity, offering a narrative about sexual assault in which the assault itself is not what potentially tears a couple apart, but how they deal with the aftermath, in a world where justice is hard to come by. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2021
100% Petite Maman (2021) Petite Maman is about how everything has an expiration date. We're constantly saying goodbye - to moments, to places, to stages of life, and to people, even before they die. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2021
No Score Yet Summer Blur (2020) One of the only films I've ever seen that charts a young girl's realisation of just how misogynistic the world is, as we watch her register every micro-aggression, and navigate how she can exist within it. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2021
95% I'm Your Man (2021) By presenting us with a vivid, complicated, and funny woman, Schrader dares us to ask whether Alma should take Tom or if she deserves more? - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2021
100% What Do We See When We Look at the Sky? (2021) It's also a tough watch, perhaps deliberately, because to see the world through Koberidze's eyes is to struggle to see it differently - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2021
89% Together Together (2021) Sweetly subversive if a little thin. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2021
95% CODA (2021) Despite a plethora of coming-of-age story cliches, CODA still feels genuinely original, nuanced, and important because it has thoughtful, sensitive storytelling where it counts - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2021
91% Charlatan (2020) Charlatan uses Mikoláek as a sort of metaphor for post-war communism in order to ask whether the new regime is really a form of liberation or just a variation on a fascist theme. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 30, 2020
No Score Yet Sex, Sin & 69 (2019) It's mostly talking heads, and an animated timeline, but there is something powerful about giving authority to the people who were there and often unable to tell their story in the mainstream media (or historical account). - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2020
100% The Strong Ones (Los fuertes) (2019) A quiet, romantic, if bittersweet crowdpleaser - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2020
No Score Yet Shadow of Dumont (2020) Cameron treats the film as an adventure narrative, uncovering the story of someone he revered but knew little about. His roots in comedy means he's always looking for a laugh, trying to keep things bright and light and fun - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2020
91% Coming Home Again (2020) Wayne Wang's Coming Home Again is a heartfelt story of a first generation Korean-American grieving as he takes care of his mother as she dies of cancer. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2020
No Score Yet Monkey Beach (2020) Monkey Beach... is a visually sumptuous film made on a low budget, that will make you want to buy a ticket to BC as soon as it's safe to do so. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2020
No Score Yet Saint-Narcisse (2020) Saint-Narcisse is a strong contender for the most "WTF did I just watch" film of the year, and a hell of a ride you're not likely to forget. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2020
No Score Yet Antisemitism (Antisémitismes) (2020) Not for the faint of heart, Ilan Ziv's fascinating and harrowing documentary Antisemitism traces the seeds of antisemitism in France, particularly in the 20th century. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2020
No Score Yet There's No Place Like This Place, Anyplace (2020) A wonderful document of a place that one hopes time won't forget, including archival footage of the early days of the store and a sense of what it's meant to immigrants, including Wei's family. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
100% No Hard Feelings (Futur Drei) (2020) Shariat makes some bold directorial moves toward surrealism in the film's final act, an interesting if not always effective choice, but otherwise, this is a thoughtful, naturalistic drama about figuring out who you are and where you fit. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
No Score Yet When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit (Als Hitler das rosa Kaninchen stahl) (2019) Judith Kerr's beloved children's novel gets a worthy adaptation from German director Caroline Link in this film that balances the hardships and fear of being a refugee with the optimism of childhood. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
96% Dating Amber (2020) Ultimately, it's the performances that sell it and make you root for these misfits to find somewhere they feel like they fit in. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
79% I Am Greta (2020) Nathan Grossman's I Am Greta about teen climate activist Greta Thunberg tells the story of the girl behind the figurehead but fails to take an interest in what matters most to her. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2020
No Score Yet John Ware Reclaimed (2020) Cheryl Foggo's moving, enlightening, and appropriately infuriating new documentary, John Ware Reclaimed, attempts to reclaim not just John Ware's story from the biased history books but the history of Black Canadians in the prairies. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2020
100% Nadia, Butterfly (2020) With Nadia, Butterfly, Pascal Plante used his own experiences as a competitive swimmer to make a psychological character study about the sport where all the swimming is real. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2020
100% Rurangi (2020) Rurangi is a film that is all in the character details, and is filled with so many beautiful, lived in performances - many of which are by Maori and gender diverse actors. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2020
87% Violation (2021) Violation starts out well but disappoints - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2020
89% Percy vs Goliath (2020) If it takes a workhorse feel-good film to make me pay attention to Saskatchewan, then, perhaps cinema really is doing its job as an empathy machine. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
93% Beans (2020) Tracey Deer's Beans is a flawed but incredibly moving about a 12-year-old Mohawk girl's political awakening during the Oka crisis. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2020
90% True Mothers (Asa ga kuru) (2020) True Mothers is one of Naomi Kawase's best films to date, a thoughtful drama about the shame associated with unconventional motherhood. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2020
69% Ammonite (2020) Ammonite is getting billed as a period romance, but where Lee really excels is in evoking the time and place... - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2020
82% Spinster (2020) Using the structure and aesthetics of a romantic comedy allow us to revel in what we love about the genre while challenging our expectations of whether our protagonist's happy ending needs to involve romantic love. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2020
99% Miss Juneteenth (2020) Nicole Beharie is so good as a young mother trying so hard to make a better life for her daughter that you can forgive Miss Juneteenth for its clunkiness and predictability - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 25, 2020
48% Greed (2020) Greed introduces us to the disgustingly rich as a means of showing how the selfish cruelty of the one at the top can trickle down to affect how capitalistic systems are designed - hurting people that the head honcho will never see or care about. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2020
88% Sorry We Missed You (2020) Sorry We Missed You charts how decent people turn cruel and desperate when they're stuck with no financial options. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2020
67% The Delinquent Season (2018) [Cillian] Murphy is fascinating as a well-meaning man who is regularly a jerk, and the film slowly excavates his psychology; Murphy is especially still in this, as other people orbit around him and push his life in various directions. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2020
81% Hearts and Bones (2020) With strong performances from the entire cast and a sensitive look at two very different marriages, the film is well worth a watch despite some clunky sections. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 28, 2020
87% Cuties (Mignonnes) (2020) Maïmouna Doucouré's Cuties is an often compelling crowd-pleaser, if somewhat under-baked, which looks at how girls end up becoming over-sexualized at a young age. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
82% Summer White (Blanco de Verano) (2020) Rodrigo Ruiz Patterson's Summer White is a haunting story about a toxic mother-son relationship that gets interrupted by her new beau. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
No Score Yet Okavango: River of Dreams - Director's Cut (2020) It's a stunning piece of work that reminds you of the wonder and beauty of nature, and serves as a tacit call-to-action to protect this remarkable ecosystem. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
100% Charter (2020) The give and take between Elina and Alice becomes the heart of Charter, and Kernell subtly charts how they become more physically close to each other in the frame, even touching, the more emotionally close they become. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 29, 2020
88% What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael (2019) What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael is frustratingly opaque about the context in which Kael was writing and the legacy she has since left. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 18, 2020
93% End of the Century (2019) End of the Century starts out like an Iberian sequel to Weekend, only to become a kind of post-modern exploration of love, sex, intimacy, and possible lives. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
91% High Flying Bird (2019) In typical Soderbergh fashion, High Flying Bird is a film about basketball featuring no games of basketball, and a thriller that derives its suspense from the fast-paced, rhythmic dialogue of Tarrel Alvin McCraney. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
89% Cunningham (2019) Cunningham attempts to make sense of...disorder - not as it works in an individual [Cunningham] piece, but how it served as an organizing principle throughout Cunningham's career. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
89% 1917 (2020) 1917 is breathtaking in every way. A chamber drama tucked inside an exquisitely rendered war epic, 1917 is more heartstopping thriller than traditional war movie. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
90% Blood Quantum (2020) Blood Quantum falls into [a] trap: a zombie movie with a thoughtful if blunt-force metaphor that has entertaining blood and guts but inchoate ideas and undercooked characters. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
89% Top End Wedding (2019) Wayne Blair's Top End Wedding is a conventional crowd-pleasing getting married comedy with some surprisingly profound insights about how easy it is to lose ties to your culture when it's not the dominant one. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
100% Vai (2019) Taken together, the films paint a picture of the dominating influence of New Zealand and the importance of local culture and ritual, but also the increasing importance of education and the precarity of life on the land - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
100% An Impossible Love (Un amour impossible) (2018) Un amour impossible is a tough watch, but oh, what a beautiful film. The period costumes are not only gorgeous but the textures are rendered with such precision you feel like you could reach out and touch them. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
85% In Safe Hands (Pupille) (2018) Jeanne Henry's Pupille (In Safe Hands) offers a look inside the adoption system through the lens of multiple stakeholders, bringing humanity to an often invisible system. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020
No Score Yet Jeune Juliette (2019) Jeune Juliette is an absolutely delightful and body positive teen comedy about 14-year-old Juliette, a smart and savvy outsider who is coming to terms with her own identity and how people treat her because she is plump. - Seventh Row EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 12, 2020