Anthony Lane Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Anthony Lane

Anthony Lane
Anthony Lane's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
88% Battle of the Sexes (2017) The steady procession of setups and payoffs can feel suspiciously pat. Yet the new movie holds more surprises.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
67% mother! (2017) If you gave an extremely bright fifteen-year-old a bag of unfamiliar herbs to smoke, and forty million dollars or so to play with, "Mother!" would be the result.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
100% Ex Libris: New York Public Library (2017) Graceful and all-embracing ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2017
76% The Limehouse Golem (2017) It feels at once crammed and sketchy, riddled with flashbacks and framing devices, and woefully light on frights.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2017
69% The Unknown Girl (La fille inconnue) (2017) You think afresh of the film's title and wonder, Who is more unknown here, the nameless victim or the inscrutable doctor?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2017
43% Bushwick (2017) The effects are scarcely special, and Bushwick locals will have many bones to pick, but somehow the movie gets to you, with its doomy political soothsaying.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2017
93% Logan Lucky (2017) Such is the merriment of the new movie, and so spirited is its pace, that you barely notice the wavering of the tone.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2017
91% Marjorie Prime (2017) The film, with its coastal haze and its fickle gusts of rain, is likely to lodge in your memory. Or, as it will soon be called, your hard drive.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2017
84% Nocturama (2017) It is at once damnable and debonair. It seduces as it repels.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
88% Good Time (2017) It marks a major stride forward, at once sure-footed in its method and destabilizing in its effect.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
99% Whose Streets? (2017) There are sequences here, with officers arrayed in gas masks and guns mounted atop armored vehicles, that would not look out of place in a war film.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
82% Detroit (2017) In some ways, "Detroit" is Bigelow's simplest work to date. Not that its methods are anything but agile and deft.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
93% Dunkirk (2017) The movie works. Time and again, the action swells and dips, like a wave, then suddenly delivers a salty slap in the face.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2017
88% Lady Macbeth (2017) Few movies this year will be more likely to molest your sleep.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
93% War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) Although it rouses and overwhelms, it ain't much fun. ... Still, there is much to relish.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
85% Okja (2017) What makes the jumble cohere, as usual with Bong, is his extraordinary grasp of space and speed, especially in the Korean half of the film.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
92% A Ghost Story (2017) The questions that Lowery raises hang in the air, like motes of dust, long after the movie is done.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
100% My Journey Through French Cinema (Voyage À Travers Le Cinéma Français) (2017) It would be a shame if the film were to be seen only by those already interested in French cinema. Anyone with an eye for grace, industry, resilience, rich shadows, and strong cigarettes should go along.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
93% Baby Driver (2017) The regrettable truth is that Baby's a dull boy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
98% The Big Sick (2017) Deft and appealing ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
78% The Beguiled (2017) "The Beguiled" runs for ninety-four minutes, and even those feel like a stretch.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
77% Beatriz at Dinner (2017) Arteta is clearly confident of preaching to the converted, and of whipping up indignation at those who mean us harm. Thanks to his leading players, however, the movie grows limber, ambiguous, and twice as interesting, and the sermon goes astray.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
92% I, Daniel Blake (2017) Politically, of course, it cleaves to the left, yet by temperament it shrinks from progress.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
84% Letters From Baghdad (2017) You emerge from the film with a divided heart: thrilled to hear of a woman who, ignoring the dictates of the age, filled her days to overflowing, yet ashamed to measure your own days and to find them, by comparison, hollow and bare.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
18% Baywatch (2017) Thank heaven for Dwayne Johnson, whose foot-wide smile will not be switched off, and who saves the life of the movie. Whether it deserves to be saved is another matter.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
70% Alien: Covenant (2017) There are plenty of reasons to shut your eyes and cross your legs while watching this film, but is that the same as being scared?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
50% The Dinner (2017) Despite the skill of the cast, you spend much of the film trying to decide which of its characters most deserves to choke on an appetizer.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2017
80% Chuck (2017) In truth, this isn't a boxing movie at all. It's a movie about the kinds of existence in which boxing, or the swagger of boxing movies, can feel like a big deal.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
82% Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) Let's hope that Vol. 3 recaptures the fizz of the original, instead of slumping into the most expensive group-therapy session in the universe.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
91% A Quiet Passion (2017) A Quiet Passion is wittier, in its early stretches, than anyone might have foreseen, but it's when the door closes, and the Dickinsons are alone with their trepidations, that the movie draws near to its rightful severity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
40% Aftermath (2017) Sadly, as the characters converge, the rest of the movie loses force; it slackens and then rushes, and the time frames feel out of joint.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
87% The Lost City of Z (2017) "The Lost City of Z" is beautiful, mournful, and measured. But the tale that it tells cries out for madness.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
95% Graduation (Bacalaureat) (2017) Behind every turn of the plot lies an overwhelming plea: How do you get the hell out of purgatory?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
44% Ghost in the Shell (2017) Sadly, as the plot proceeds, Sanders begins to duck ... bothersome concepts. He picks a more sentimental path, which leads Major, following the example of Jason Bourne, on a quest to discover who she truly is.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
71% Beauty and the Beast (2017) The sheer dexterity is overwhelming, and only the sternest viewer will be able to resist the onslaught of such thoroughly marketed magic.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
90% Frantz (2017) This smooth-looking movie is taking moral risks.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 10, 2017
80% Personal Shopper (2017) Hre's the weirdest thing of all about Personal Shopper: it works.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 10, 2017
90% Raw (2017) The grosser it grows, the less interesting it becomes. When the carnage was over, I went out and had a steak.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
76% Kong: Skull Island (2017) The thing that breaks the back of this movie, and makes the second half so much less prodigious than the first, is a simple matter of geography.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
93% Logan (2017) When Logan and Laura unleash their furious scythes nothing feels settled or satisfied. The world grinds on, fruitlessly weary and wild.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2017
99% Get Out (2017) Wait for those moments, scattered throughout the action, when the winces quicken into jolts and jumps; and consider how much is packed into Peele's terrific title.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2017
89% Land of Mine (Under Sandet) (2017) Again and again, its stark and suspenseful compositions strike the eye-figures in dark clothing, prone on a pale beach, with lines of wire, black warning flags, and the chill gray waves beyond.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
83% A United Kingdom (2017) On the whole, Asante's movie, though crammed with the white man's treachery, has a dulled and inoffensive sheen ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
60% Dark Night (2017) There are serious risks in the movie's approach.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
43% Gold (2017) You feel weirdly uninvolved, and ever more unsurprised by the lurches of fate.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
74% Split (2017) In short, we are watching an old-fashioned exploitation flick-part of a depleted and degrading genre that not even M. Night Shyamalan, the writer and director of "Split," can redeem.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
96% The Salesman (Forushande) (2017) With every shot, our sympathies flicker and tilt.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
52% The Ardennes (D'Ardennen) (2017) The film ... slumps in the middle, only to compensate with a final act, set in the wooded region of the title, that feels rich in kills and overkills.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2017
83% The Founder (2017) Layer by layer, this dumbfounding movie devises its magical recipe, and dares us to resist it: ketchup, mustard, two slices of pickle, and hold the irony. Delicious.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2017
94% Neruda (2016) It reminds us that movies, by their very nature, owe far more to poetry than they ever will to the novel.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016