Anthony Lane Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Anthony Lane

Anthony Lane
Anthony Lane's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
85% The Post (2017) Nothing is more promisingly solid, to the moviegoer, than a major Spielberg production. You can foretell everything from the calibration of the craftsmanship to the heft of the cast, and "The Post" inarguably delivers.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 11, 2017
94% The Shape of Water (2017) At the start, I worried that the film might prove merely winsome, like a Maryland "Amélie," but Hawkins makes it taut and fierce.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 7, 2017
96% Call Me by Your Name (2017) So assailed are we by reports of harmful pleasures, and of the coercive male will being imposed through lust, that it comes as a relief to be reminded, in such style, of consensual joy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
84% Darkest Hour (2017) How badly we need another Winston Churchill film is open to question. Nonetheless, Joe Wright's contribution to the genre is welcome, largely because of Gary Oldman in the leading role.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 27, 2017
91% Thelma (2017) "Thelma" exerts a grip of its own, not least when it presses against other genres, leaching details from both science fiction and horror.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
58% Murder On The Orient Express (2017) Contriving somehow both to dawdle and to rush, "Murder on the Orient Express" is handsome, undemanding, and almost wholly bereft of purpose.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 13, 2017
93% Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) Not since "Fargo" (1996) has [McDormand] found a character of such fibre. She doesn't pitch it to us, still less try to make it palatable; she seems to state Mildred, presenting her as a given fact, like someone unrolling a map.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 6, 2017
28% Suburbicon (2017) Only occasionally does an image strike a lyrical blow and yield the creepy effect that Clooney is aiming for ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
73% Last Flag Flying (2017) Some stories need not be told again.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 30, 2017
81% The Square (2017) Any compassionate gestures toward the lower depths of society, with nicely composed shots of the homeless on the street, feel too flimsy to carry critical weight.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
79% The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) No one but Lanthimos could adhere so loyally to the classical model of the tragic, yet the result treads close to monotony, and even to a kind of sorrowful sadism ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
93% The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) (2017) Baumbach's ripest and wisest film to date, alert to the fact that so little in life, especially a screwy or a super-ambitious life, is open to resolution.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
71% Wonderstruck (2017) "Wonderstruck" fails to convince, so intent is Haynes on banishing loose ends and slotting each coincidence into place. The result is itself a kind of diorama: exquisitely detailed, assembled with infinite care, but lacking the breath of life.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 23, 2017
91% Our Souls at Night (2017) Much of this is too hokey by half, yet the two leading actors, their skills unfaded, command your attention to the end.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 9, 2017
87% Blade Runner 2049 (2017) Despite all the overlaps, this is not a simulacrum of a Ridley Scott film. It is unmistakably a Denis Villeneuve film, inviting us to tumble, tense with anticipation, into his doomy clutches.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Oct 6, 2017
87% American Made (2017) The impetuous pace of the film is at one with its moral shamelessness, and, without thinking, we sign up for both.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2017
65% Victoria & Abdul (2017) The film's attempt to portray the Queen as more politically enlightened than her courtiers is kindly but unconvincing, and many of the actors bark and behave as if participating in a spoof.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 29, 2017
18% Woodshock (2017) The movie unfolds in a fog of grief and guilt-a state of affairs instead of a plot, and a serious test of the viewer's patience.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
86% Battle of the Sexes (2017) The steady procession of setups and payoffs can feel suspiciously pat. Yet the new movie holds more surprises.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
68% mother! (2017) If you gave an extremely bright fifteen-year-old a bag of unfamiliar herbs to smoke, and forty million dollars or so to play with, "Mother!" would be the result.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 18, 2017
96% Ex Libris: New York Public Library (2017) Graceful and all-embracing ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 11, 2017
75% The Limehouse Golem (2017) It feels at once crammed and sketchy, riddled with flashbacks and framing devices, and woefully light on frights.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2017
70% The Unknown Girl (La fille inconnue) (2017) You think afresh of the film's title and wonder, Who is more unknown here, the nameless victim or the inscrutable doctor?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2017
46% Bushwick (2017) The effects are scarcely special, and Bushwick locals will have many bones to pick, but somehow the movie gets to you, with its doomy political soothsaying.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Sep 4, 2017
93% Logan Lucky (2017) Such is the merriment of the new movie, and so spirited is its pace, that you barely notice the wavering of the tone.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2017
89% Marjorie Prime (2017) The film, with its coastal haze and its fickle gusts of rain, is likely to lodge in your memory. Or, as it will soon be called, your hard drive.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 19, 2017
86% Nocturama (2017) It is at once damnable and debonair. It seduces as it repels.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
91% Good Time (2017) It marks a major stride forward, at once sure-footed in its method and destabilizing in its effect.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
99% Whose Streets? (2017) There are sequences here, with officers arrayed in gas masks and guns mounted atop armored vehicles, that would not look out of place in a war film.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
83% Detroit (2017) In some ways, "Detroit" is Bigelow's simplest work to date. Not that its methods are anything but agile and deft.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
92% Dunkirk (2017) The movie works. Time and again, the action swells and dips, like a wave, then suddenly delivers a salty slap in the face.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 24, 2017
89% Lady Macbeth (2017) Few movies this year will be more likely to molest your sleep.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
93% War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) Although it rouses and overwhelms, it ain't much fun. ... Still, there is much to relish.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
86% Okja (2017) What makes the jumble cohere, as usual with Bong, is his extraordinary grasp of space and speed, especially in the Korean half of the film.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
90% A Ghost Story (2017) The questions that Lowery raises hang in the air, like motes of dust, long after the movie is done.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
100% My Journey Through French Cinema (Voyage À Travers Le Cinéma Français) (2017) It would be a shame if the film were to be seen only by those already interested in French cinema. Anyone with an eye for grace, industry, resilience, rich shadows, and strong cigarettes should go along.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
93% Baby Driver (2017) The regrettable truth is that Baby's a dull boy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
98% The Big Sick (2017) Deft and appealing ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
78% The Beguiled (2017) "The Beguiled" runs for ninety-four minutes, and even those feel like a stretch.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
75% Beatriz at Dinner (2017) Arteta is clearly confident of preaching to the converted, and of whipping up indignation at those who mean us harm. Thanks to his leading players, however, the movie grows limber, ambiguous, and twice as interesting, and the sermon goes astray.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
93% I, Daniel Blake (2017) Politically, of course, it cleaves to the left, yet by temperament it shrinks from progress.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
84% Letters From Baghdad (2017) You emerge from the film with a divided heart: thrilled to hear of a woman who, ignoring the dictates of the age, filled her days to overflowing, yet ashamed to measure your own days and to find them, by comparison, hollow and bare.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
18% Baywatch (2017) Thank heaven for Dwayne Johnson, whose foot-wide smile will not be switched off, and who saves the life of the movie. Whether it deserves to be saved is another matter.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
68% Alien: Covenant (2017) There are plenty of reasons to shut your eyes and cross your legs while watching this film, but is that the same as being scared?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
47% The Dinner (2017) Despite the skill of the cast, you spend much of the film trying to decide which of its characters most deserves to choke on an appetizer.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2017
80% Chuck (2017) In truth, this isn't a boxing movie at all. It's a movie about the kinds of existence in which boxing, or the swagger of boxing movies, can feel like a big deal.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
83% Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) Let's hope that Vol. 3 recaptures the fizz of the original, instead of slumping into the most expensive group-therapy session in the universe.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
92% A Quiet Passion (2017) A Quiet Passion is wittier, in its early stretches, than anyone might have foreseen, but it's when the door closes, and the Dickinsons are alone with their trepidations, that the movie draws near to its rightful severity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
39% Aftermath (2017) Sadly, as the characters converge, the rest of the movie loses force; it slackens and then rushes, and the time frames feel out of joint.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
87% The Lost City of Z (2017) "The Lost City of Z" is beautiful, mournful, and measured. But the tale that it tells cries out for madness.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017