Anthony Lane Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Anthony Lane

Anthony Lane
Anthony Lane's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): New Yorker

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
90% Lady Macbeth (2017) Few movies this year will be more likely to molest your sleep.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
95% War for the Planet of the Apes (2017) Although it rouses and overwhelms, it ain't much fun. ... Still, there is much to relish.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2017
85% Okja (2017) What makes the jumble cohere, as usual with Bong, is his extraordinary grasp of space and speed, especially in the Korean half of the film.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
88% A Ghost Story (2017) The questions that Lowery raises hang in the air, like motes of dust, long after the movie is done.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
100% My Journey Through French Cinema (Voyage À Travers Le Cinéma Français) (2017) It would be a shame if the film were to be seen only by those already interested in French cinema. Anyone with an eye for grace, industry, resilience, rich shadows, and strong cigarettes should go along.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
95% Baby Driver (2017) The regrettable truth is that Baby's a dull boy.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
97% The Big Sick (2017) Deft and appealing ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
78% The Beguiled (2017) "The Beguiled" runs for ninety-four minutes, and even those feel like a stretch.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 19, 2017
77% Beatriz at Dinner (2017) Arteta is clearly confident of preaching to the converted, and of whipping up indignation at those who mean us harm. Thanks to his leading players, however, the movie grows limber, ambiguous, and twice as interesting, and the sermon goes astray.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
92% I, Daniel Blake (2017) Politically, of course, it cleaves to the left, yet by temperament it shrinks from progress.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
81% Letters From Baghdad (2017) You emerge from the film with a divided heart: thrilled to hear of a woman who, ignoring the dictates of the age, filled her days to overflowing, yet ashamed to measure your own days and to find them, by comparison, hollow and bare.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
19% Baywatch (2017) Thank heaven for Dwayne Johnson, whose foot-wide smile will not be switched off, and who saves the life of the movie. Whether it deserves to be saved is another matter.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 29, 2017
71% Alien: Covenant (2017) There are plenty of reasons to shut your eyes and cross your legs while watching this film, but is that the same as being scared?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 22, 2017
50% The Dinner (2017) Despite the skill of the cast, you spend much of the film trying to decide which of its characters most deserves to choke on an appetizer.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 15, 2017
79% Chuck (2017) In truth, this isn't a boxing movie at all. It's a movie about the kinds of existence in which boxing, or the swagger of boxing movies, can feel like a big deal.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
81% Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) Let's hope that Vol. 3 recaptures the fizz of the original, instead of slumping into the most expensive group-therapy session in the universe.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted May 8, 2017
92% A Quiet Passion (2017) A Quiet Passion is wittier, in its early stretches, than anyone might have foreseen, but it's when the door closes, and the Dickinsons are alone with their trepidations, that the movie draws near to its rightful severity.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 17, 2017
39% Aftermath (2017) Sadly, as the characters converge, the rest of the movie loses force; it slackens and then rushes, and the time frames feel out of joint.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
87% The Lost City of Z (2017) "The Lost City of Z" is beautiful, mournful, and measured. But the tale that it tells cries out for madness.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 10, 2017
96% Graduation (Bacalaureat) (2017) Behind every turn of the plot lies an overwhelming plea: How do you get the hell out of purgatory?‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
45% Ghost in the Shell (2017) Sadly, as the plot proceeds, Sanders begins to duck ... bothersome concepts. He picks a more sentimental path, which leads Major, following the example of Jason Bourne, on a quest to discover who she truly is.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Apr 3, 2017
71% Beauty and the Beast (2017) The sheer dexterity is overwhelming, and only the sternest viewer will be able to resist the onslaught of such thoroughly marketed magic.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 20, 2017
90% Frantz (2017) This smooth-looking movie is taking moral risks.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 10, 2017
79% Personal Shopper (2017) Hre's the weirdest thing of all about Personal Shopper: it works.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 10, 2017
91% Raw (2017) The grosser it grows, the less interesting it becomes. When the carnage was over, I went out and had a steak.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
76% Kong: Skull Island (2017) The thing that breaks the back of this movie, and makes the second half so much less prodigious than the first, is a simple matter of geography.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Mar 6, 2017
93% Logan (2017) When Logan and Laura unleash their furious scythes nothing feels settled or satisfied. The world grinds on, fruitlessly weary and wild.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2017
99% Get Out (2017) Wait for those moments, scattered throughout the action, when the winces quicken into jolts and jumps; and consider how much is packed into Peele's terrific title.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2017
88% Land of Mine (Under Sandet) (2017) Again and again, its stark and suspenseful compositions strike the eye-figures in dark clothing, prone on a pale beach, with lines of wire, black warning flags, and the chill gray waves beyond.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
83% A United Kingdom (2017) On the whole, Asante's movie, though crammed with the white man's treachery, has a dulled and inoffensive sheen ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Feb 6, 2017
65% Dark Night (2017) There are serious risks in the movie's approach.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
43% Gold (2017) You feel weirdly uninvolved, and ever more unsurprised by the lurches of fate.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 30, 2017
75% Split (2017) In short, we are watching an old-fashioned exploitation flick-part of a depleted and degrading genre that not even M. Night Shyamalan, the writer and director of "Split," can redeem.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
97% The Salesman (Forushande) (2017) With every shot, our sympathies flicker and tilt.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2017
54% The Ardennes (D'Ardennen) (2017) The film ... slumps in the middle, only to compensate with a final act, set in the wooded region of the title, that feels rich in kills and overkills.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2017
84% The Founder (2017) Layer by layer, this dumbfounding movie devises its magical recipe, and dares us to resist it: ketchup, mustard, two slices of pickle, and hold the irony. Delicious.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2017
94% Neruda (2016) It reminds us that movies, by their very nature, owe far more to poetry than they ever will to the novel.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
96% Paterson (2016) This movie has almost no bite but plenty of moseying charm, and what it does get right is the idea of poets as perpetual magpies.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 27, 2016
83% Julieta (2016) Almodóvar-whose penchant for narrative complexity grows ever deeper-latches on to the idea of personal history as a puzzle that refuses to be solved.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2016
89% 20th Century Women (2017) The movie belongs wholeheartedly to Bening, and to the age, come and gone, that she enshrines.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2016
92% La La Land (2016) Catch the film on the largest screen you can find, with a sound system to match, even if that means journeying all day.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Dec 5, 2016
60% Allied (2016) Zemeckis ... seems uncertain whether to treat the tale as a wrenching saga of split loyalties or as a glamorous jaunt. Having gathered all the ingredients for derring-do, he forgets to turn up the heat, and the derring never does.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 28, 2016
89% Jackie (2016) I happen to find the result intrusive, presumptuous, and often absurd, but, for anyone who thinks that all formality is a front, and that the only point of a façade is that it should crack, "Jackie" delivers a gratifying thrill.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 28, 2016
75% The Eyes of My Mother (2016) The movie, for all its physicality, shrivels up at the slightest touch of logic. All of which, to be fair, is likely to lure rather than to repel any Poe-steeped addicts of horror ...‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 28, 2016
96% Manchester by the Sea (2016) If you feel ashamed to be laughing, then Lonergan has got you exactly where he wants you-stirred and confounded, casting around for breaks in the cloud of sadness.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2016
73% Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016) In all, the movie is a cunning and peppy surprise, dulled only by the news that no less than four sequels await.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2016
85% Lion (2016) Davis's film is based on a true story; though wrenching, there is barely enough of it to fill the dramatic space, and the second half is a slow and muted affair after the Dickensian punch of the first.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 21, 2016
90% Elle (2016) The question of whether "Elle" is pernicious nonsense or an excruciating black comedy is brushed aside in Huppert's demonstration of sangfroid.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
74% Nocturnal Animals (2016) I felt sorry for Gyllenhaal, berated in both his personae for being weak, and for Adams, strapped and laced into a role that scarcely lets her breathe.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 14, 2016
94% Arrival (2016) So sure is the stride of the narrative, and so bracing the air of expectation, that you feel yourself, like Louise, beginning to spin, and barely able to catch your breath.‐ New Yorker
Read More | Posted Nov 7, 2016