Chuck Bowen Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Chuck Bowen

Chuck Bowen
Chuck Bowen's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Slant Magazine

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
3/4 93% Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) Twenty-six years after its release on Independence Day weekend in 1991, it's difficult not to watch Terminator 2: Judgement Day through a scrim of irony. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 21, 2017
1.5/4 72% Lemon (2017) Lemon by Chuck Bowen 1.5 Stars Self-absorption is Janicza Bravo's focus, though--as in other smug and mock-ironic comedies--it's a topic that's less examined than indulged. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 15, 2017
3.5/4 93% Marjorie Prime (2017) Mapping the intersection between history and emotion, Michael Almereyda finds himself in Alain Resnais terrain. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 14, 2017
2.5/4 98% In This Corner of the World (Kono sekai no katasumi ni) (2017) Sunao Katabuchi displays a vivid, shattering awareness of how domestic routines can spiritually ground one during a time of demoralizing chaos.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 9, 2017
2/4 82% The Trip to Spain (2017) The premise of Michael Winterbottom's series has devolved from moderately diverting to actively stifling. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2017
4/4 96% Unforgiven (1992) Unforgiven brought the revisionist revenge film into the 1990s and, by extension, the 21st century.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 31, 2017
4/4 98% Columbus (2017) The seeming miracle of Columbus is its mixture of formal precision with a philosophical grasp of human mystery.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 30, 2017
2.5/4 57% Strange Weather (2017) There's a tough and mysterious film within Strange Weather, though it doesn't quite escape the strictures of a busy and studiously weird narrative that's governed by formula screenwriting.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 26, 2017
1/4 31% From the Land of the Moon (Mal de pierres) (2017) The film is so humorless and in love with its own obviousness that it grows laughable. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 25, 2017
2.5/4 90% RUMBLE: The Indians Who Rocked the World (2017) This is history that Americans should know, and Bainbridge and Maiorana approach their film as an introductory survey course, which undercuts Rumble's aesthetic intensity. F‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 23, 2017
3.5/4 93% Escapes (2017) A preoccupation with the totemic materiality of cinema runs through Michael Almereyda's documentary.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 23, 2017
2/4 73% Landline (2017) Heroin is to Landline what abortion is to Robespierre's Obvious Child: a dangerous little variable planted to strategically unsettle the pervading cutesiness.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
87% The Lost City of Z (2017) One of the most beautiful and mysterious of all existentialist adventure films receives a deservedly lush and subtle transfer.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2017
3/4 71% To the Bone (2017) One of the film's great qualities is its casualness and willingness to be simply human and to not let sociological politics dominate.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 11, 2017
2/4 19% False Confessions (Les fausses confidences) (2017) The film is a trim farce with no blood flowing under its skin, as it's all construction, setup, and payoff.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2017
2.5/4 44% Bronx Gothic (2017) By design, the film is intensely preachy. And this preachiness serves a therapeutic purpose, offering jolting possibilities for empathy.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2017
91% Straw Dogs (1971) One of the most ambiguous, neurotic, and disturbing of all American films receives a revelatory new restoration, with supplements that ably grapple with its chaos.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2017
4/4 86% Blow-Up (1966) Michelangelo Antonioni's film is an inquiry into the modernist concern of what art is and how it affects life.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2017
2/4 57% The Confessions (2017) Director Roberto Andò takes the form of a classical whodunit and bludgeons it with naïve indignation and sanctimony. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 4, 2017
2.5/4 83% Santoalla (2017) Andrew Becker and Daniel Mehrer get close to their subjects only to retreat when things get truly dangerous.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2017
3/4 76% The Little Hours (2017) For all its hip ludicrousness, The Little Hours has a point: to almost earnestly riff on how atheism has taken hold of 21st-century America, by rooting our nation's moors in a time of great austerity, sexism, classism, and persecution. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
3/4 96% The B-Side: Elsa Dorfman's Portrait Photography (2017) Errol Morris films Dorfman and her work with a rapt attentiveness that maps the nostalgic and regretful stirrings of her soul. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
2.5/4 86% Okja (2017) In Okja, a transporting protest fantasy becomes another shrill dust-up in the waging of the culture wars.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 26, 2017
3.5/4 100% In Transit (2015) The film's thematic organization suggests the cinematic equivalent of a short-story collection, with haunting tangents and stray notes of poetry. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 21, 2017
2.5/4 44% The Bad Batch (2017) Ana Lily Amirpour has learned a few lessons from QT about the disreputable joys of blending kitsch and ultraviolence.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 18, 2017
2.5/4 87% Lost in Paris (Paris pieds nus) (2017) Lost in Paris abounds in whimsy that, for the most part, isn't irritatingly precious-a feat that's harder to pull off than it appears. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 14, 2017
3.5/4 100% Harmonium (Fuchi ni tatsu) (2017) Throughout Harmonium, writer-director Kôji Fukada works in a rapt and lucid hyper-textural style that suggests a merging of the sensibilities of Alfred Hitchcock and Yasujirô Ozu.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2017
2/4 86% Moka (2017) Frédéric Mermoud's film makes an elaborate pretense of honoring the traditions of the observational procedural. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2017
2.5/4 95% Night School (2017) The high school diploma is accepted by the film too conveniently as a problem-solving MacGuffin.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 7, 2017
3.5/4 100% Dawson City: Frozen Time (2017) Throughout, filmmaker Bill Morrison mixes documentarian detail with an ecstatic sense of poetry. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2017
2/4 48% Churchill (2017) The film simplifies Winston Churchill's legacy for the dubious purposes of narrative momentum and emotional lift. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Jun 1, 2017
2/4 54% War Machine (2017) Writer-director David Michôd's film renders existential crises of American entitlement dull and tedious.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 23, 2017
90% Reservoir Dogs (1992) As QT's first film as both writer and director, Reservoir Dogs indicates a remarkably fully formed cinematic sensibility.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
2.5/4 92% Abacus: Small Enough to Jail (2017) Steve James's film is a rallying cry, and its weaknesses as art might bolster its strength as reformatory theater.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017
3/4 90% Icaros: A Vision (2017) The film has a calming and inevitable quality, and a leisurely sense of pacing that favors image and sound over narrative propulsion, that slows our own biorhythms, fostering our sensorial empathy with the passengers. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 17, 2017
2/4 72% The Wizard of Lies (2017) The Wizard of Lies bears less of a resemblance to art than a book report.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 14, 2017
2.5/4 79% Folk Hero & Funny Guy (2017) In the film's best scenes, Jeff Grace displays a delicate understanding of various modes of male fragility.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 7, 2017
2/4 79% Chuck (2017) Like its protagonist, Philippe Falardeau's film gets lost in a haze of incidental cacophony.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 2, 2017
1.5/4 51% The Dinner (2017) The film is shrilly, luridly, dully, and unremittingly ugly, preaching to a choir that it also demonizes. ‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted May 1, 2017
1/4 21% Rupture (2017) It attempts to dress up torture-porn tropes with a late-inning switch to science fiction that spectacularly backfires.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 26, 2017
67% Thirst Street (2017) It's a testament to Nathan Silver's keen sense of observation that we don't want the film to turn decisively into thriller terrain, as it might disrupt the wonderfully wry comedy and sexuality.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 25, 2017
60% Flames (2017) Flames grows tougher, weirder, and more ambiguous, casting much of its early cuteness in a starker light.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2017
No Score Yet The Family I Had (2017) Katie Green and Carlye Rubin's film documents the transferrable perversities inherent in familial life.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2017
No Score Yet Dog Years (1998) It's unseemly watching Burt Reynolds, one of the greatest movie stars, beg for sympathy in Adam Rifkin's Dog Years.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2017
3/4 62% Slack Bay (Ma loute) (2017) Bruno Dumont's formalism is presently charged with a spark of simultaneously controlled and spontaneous mystery.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
2.5/4 81% Jeremiah Tower: The Last Magnificent (2017) Lydia Tenaglia's direction is occasionally flashy and cluttered, but her empathy for Tower is evocative and poignant.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 19, 2017
3.5/4 87% By the Time It Gets Dark (Dao khanong) (2017) [By the Time It Gets Dark ironically grows] more hypnotic, rapturous, and overpowering, discarding conventional narrative to hunt for wild emotional shard.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 5, 2017
0/4 15% Queen of the Desert (2017) Throughout Queen of the Desert's narrative, there's no sense of danger, of texture, or even of a rudimentary idea of what's truly driving Gertrude Bell.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 4, 2017
2/4 30% Salt and Fire (2017) Salt and Fire is a doodle, suggesting an assemblage of ecological riffs and fantasias that Werner Herzog may have entertained while making Into the Inferno.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2017
1.5/4 31% The Assignment (2017) Walter Hill and Michelle Rodriguez seem to share Frank's confusion over the precise difference between cosmetic and biological reality.‐ Slant Magazine
Read More | Posted Apr 2, 2017