Jeannette CatsoulisMovie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Jeannette Catsoulis

Jeannette Catsoulis
Jeannette Catsoulis's reviews (from any publication) always count toward the Tomatometer because this critic is a Tomatometer-approved critic.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
37% Alone in Berlin (2017) "Alone in Berlin" proceeds like a train crossing a plain. Without twists or turns, hills or valleys, its dramatic engine chugs reliably forward, delivering its cargo of World War II tragedy with bland efficiency. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jan 12, 2017
90% Ma (2017) Alternately sexy and silly, galvanic and gentle, "MA" is best enjoyed as a slide show of visual blessings and, sometimes, bafflements. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jan 12, 2017
5% Arsenal (2017) Despite solid acting (including John Cusack as a plainclothes detective), "Arsenal" is hobbled mainly by its director's histrionic tendencies. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jan 5, 2017
43% Between Us (2017) Stingingly attuned to the tension between long-term love and last-minute misgivings, "Between Us" makes a familiar situation feel remarkably fresh. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jan 5, 2017
83% Dr. Feelgood: Dealer or Healer? (2016) Embracing a structure that implicitly acknowledges the complexity of the issue, Ms. Marson nevertheless contributes to the film's general fuzziness by failing to clarify the legal and moral guidelines that govern these kinds of prescriptions. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 29, 2016
40% Why Him? (2016) Proving definitively that slapping Mr. Franco's scenery-eating grin on any old drivel doesn't guarantee entertainment, "Why Him?" is trite, crass and insultingly moronic. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 22, 2016
87% The Autopsy of Jane Doe (2016) Gruesome without being gory, "The Autopsy of Jane Doe" achieves real scares with a minimum of special effects. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 20, 2016
31% The Hollow Point (2016) "The Hollow Point" limps to a close without fully rewarding the effort expended on its making. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 15, 2016
24% Solace (2016) Staggeringly silly and visually disordered, this unfortunate misfire has been kicking around Europe and elsewhere for a couple of years under different titles, and it's easy to see why. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 15, 2016
67% Sword Master (2016) This nostalgic nod to the Chinese magic-and-martial arts genre known as wuxia mixes love story and clan war with equal amounts of silliness and heart. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 8, 2016
77% The Eyes of My Mother (2016) Ms. Magalhaes, a former dancer, uses her expressive eyes and graceful limbs to bring the intimacy and sensuality of her actions to vivid life. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 1, 2016
45% Pet (2016) [Its] strengths ... are undermined by a story that gives Seth an out and seems to suggest that we should forgive him. Not likely. ‐ New York Times
Posted Dec 1, 2016
95% Seasons (Les saisons) (2016) "Planet Earth" might have made us tougher to impress, but "Seasons" has the advantage of its focus on a timeline, showing the gradual incursion of man into this earthly paradise. ‐ New York Times
Posted Nov 24, 2016
81% Magnus (2016) [An] insipid and uninformative portrait of singularity and obsession. ‐ New York Times
Posted Nov 17, 2016
94% Hunter Gatherer (2016) A sweet, shambling poem to the tenacity of hope and the sustaining power of friendship, "Hunter Gatherer" joins two luckless strivers on a picaresque journey to nowhere. ‐ New York Times
Posted Nov 15, 2016
3% Shut In (2016) In this achingly inept thriller, you will see Naomi Watts do what she can to sell a plot of such preposterousness that the derisory laughter around me began barely 20 minutes in. ‐ New York Times
Posted Nov 12, 2016
100% National Bird (2016) [An] elegantly unsettling documentary about the United States' reliance on aerial combat drones. ‐ New York Times
Posted Nov 10, 2016
62% Rainbow Time (2016) Much of this is funny and even perceptive about the nooks and crannies of adult sexual relationships. It's also very well acted ... But something feels off. ‐ New York Times
Posted Nov 3, 2016
No Score Yet The Prison in Twelve Landscapes (2016) Arranges a series of oblique, geographical vignettes into an unsettling mural of systemic damage. ‐ New York Times
Posted Nov 3, 2016
No Score Yet Crosscurrent (2016) Buckling beneath the weight of its director's ambitions, Yang Chao's "Crosscurrent" is spectacular to look at and a devil to decode. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 27, 2016
77% In a Valley of Violence (2016) Spiked with dryly funny exchanges and lovingly shot by Eric Robbins on 35-millimeter film, "In a Valley of Violence" nevertheless feels exasperatingly two-dimensional. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 20, 2016
50% 31 (2016) A grindhouse slog of unrelenting bad taste. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 20, 2016
29% The Whole Truth (2016) Trundling along on the drone of Ramsay's pseudo-hardboiled voice-over, "The Whole Truth" plays like an especially claustrophobic courtroom procedural, drably photographed and generically framed. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 20, 2016
No Score Yet Huntwatch (2016) "Huntwatch" feels dismayingly one-sided. Yet as we hear of animals being skinned alive and see a bludgeoned pup linger in agony, any pro-hunt argument seems emphatically beside the point. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 13, 2016
95% Little Sister (2016) A strange, spiky movie that refuses to beg for our affection, "Little Sister," the fifth feature from Zach Clark, molds the classic homecoming drama into a quirky reconciliation between faith and family. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 13, 2016
43% Ovation! (2016) Dependably genuine, and suffused with Mr. Jaglom's increasingly mellow intelligence, this lighthearted backstage drama will feel to his fans like a gathering of familiars. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 6, 2016
42% London Town (2016) The era's skinhead riots and striking workers - and Strummer's biting, pro-immigrant lyrics - are never more than window dressing in a movie that would rather scatter fairy dust than grit. ‐ New York Times
Posted Oct 6, 2016
87% Amanda Knox (2016) You don't have to remember the gutter headlines inspired by its namesake to find the true-crime documentary "Amanda Knox" completely riveting. ‐ New York Times
Posted Sep 29, 2016
69% Operation Avalanche (2016) "Operation Avalanche" weaves well-known conspiracy theories into a goofily entertaining satire of youthful ambition co-opted as a tool of government intrigue. ‐ New York Times
Posted Sep 15, 2016
100% Transpecos (2016) Though rife with implausibilities, "Transpecos" is fortified by strong acting and a location whose desolate beauty is a gift to Jeffrey Waldron's serene camera. ‐ New York Times
Posted Sep 8, 2016
77% London Road (2016) An ungainly yet strangely captivating oddity, "London Road" snags your attention from the get-go in the manner of any razor-edge experiment: By making you wonder, what on earth? ‐ New York Times
Posted Sep 8, 2016
40% Morgan (2016) Mr. Scott creates a disappointingly skeletal Frankenstein story that entertains efficiently but vacuously. ‐ New York Times
Posted Sep 1, 2016
44% Level Up (2016) Unlovely and uninvolving, "Level Up" is a running-man cocktail of brutality spiked with low-level humor. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 25, 2016
12% The Sea of Trees (2016) A numinous meditation on grief that's more likely to inspire laughter than tears. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 25, 2016
100% Ixcanul (2016) More than a fable about the clash of tradition and modernity, "Ixcanul" is finally a painful illustration of the ease with which those who have can prey on those who don't. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 18, 2016
13% Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV (2016) There's a very real possibility that watching "Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV" could result in brain addlement. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 18, 2016
72% My King (Mon roi) (2016) From blowup to makeup to uneasy détente, "My King" is repetitive yet oddly tremendous. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 11, 2016
98% Hell or High Water (2016) If there's such a thing as an easygoing thriller, then "Hell or High Water" is it. The stakes may be steep, but the characters can seem more nonchalant than nervous. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 11, 2016
82% Front Cover (2016) Though too slight to be memorable, the gay romance "Front Cover" takes a gentle, thoughtful look at the intersection of ethnicity and sexuality. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 4, 2016
93% Richard Linklater: Dream Is Destiny (2016) It's shamelessly partial but also warmly pleasurable, partly because Mr. Linklater is an engaging and humble conversationalist who moves easily to the beat of his own soundtrack. ‐ New York Times
Posted Aug 4, 2016
89% Miss Sharon Jones! (2016) When she bounds onstage with a holler and a howl - and diction that nails every last word to the melody - it's clear she deserves that exclamation point in the title. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jul 28, 2016
66% Nerve (2016) [The] screenplay ... amounts to little more than a string of flashy stunts before fizzling to a contrived close. For all its hints at imminent catastrophe, "Nerve" feels surprisingly tame. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jul 26, 2016
96% Train to Busan (Bu-san-haeng) (2016) Sprinting right out of the gate, the director, Yeon Sang-ho, dives gleefully into a sandbox of spilled brains and smug entitlement. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jul 21, 2016
76% Lights Out (2016) Spackling over any copycat cracks with strong acting and fleet editing, "Lights Out" delivers minimalist frights in old-school ways. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jul 21, 2016
44% Tony Robbins: I Am Not Your Guru (2016) Though Mr. Berlinger had final cut, it's hard to find a single moment here that would be out of place in a promotional video. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jul 12, 2016
9% Cell (2016) Even if it weren't cheap-looking and dreary, "Cell" would still be hobbled by an entertainment landscape already lousy with zombies, and a hive-mind premise that - at least metaphorically - has been all but realized. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jul 7, 2016
50% The Debt (Oliver's Deal) (2016) Toggling between the breathtaking Peruvian highlands and the busy clamor of Lima, "The Debt" places three very different lives on a collision course freighted with moral and financial complexity. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jul 7, 2016
93% Life, Animated (2016) Mr. Williams's decision to prioritize his subject's point of view feels frustratingly restrictive. Belaboring the cartoon connection, the director leaves the family struggles that enrich Mr. Suskind's 2014 book of the same title stubbornly veiled. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jun 30, 2016
82% Les Cowboys (2016) Reaching across 15 years and multiple countries, "Les Cowboys" repurposes the narrative codes of the classic western to explore the complexities of a disrupted world. ‐ New York Times
Posted Jun 23, 2016
100% Breaking A Monster (2016) Patchily revelatory ... ‐ New York Times
Posted Jun 23, 2016