Judith Crist

Judith Crist
Tomatometer-approved critic
Biography:
(Photo Credit: Ron Galella Collection/Ron Galella Collection/ Getty Images)

Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
No Score Yet Let The Good Times Roll (1973) Let the Good Times Roll, in 99 minutes, covers in pure cinematics what Grease has been doing off and on Broadway since February, 1972 with such theatrical charm. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
63% Emperor of the North Pole (Emperor of the North) (1973) Robert Aldrich's The Emperor of the North Pole, is hard, contrived, pointless in its thesis, repulsive in its people, singularly joyless and, above all, incredible in its concoction. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
No Score Yet The Hireling (1973) [The Hireling is] a beautifully conceived and executed film, immaculate in its every detail and marked by brilliant performances that are, glowingly, a part of the whole. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
83% Blume in Love (1973) [Mazursky's] particular brand of lifestyle comedy-drama, involving marriage and divorce and sex and pot and psychiatry in Los Angeles, is as dreary and old hat and contrived as [Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice] seemed at the time. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
No Score Yet Interval (1973) This kind of kvatch really went out with the Eisenhower administration. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
85% Save the Tiger (1973) [Save the Tiger], despite its flaws, stands as a remarkable achievement for its writer, Steve Shagan; its director; and, perhaps above all, its star, Jack Lemmon. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
91% The Iceman Cometh (1973) John Frankenheimer's television origins serve him well in his relative restraint in directing the film. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
100% The Homecoming (1973) This is a work so sparkling with insight, so soaked in the mystery that lies between the lips that move and the words that emerge, that the closer the camera brings us to its bitter heart the better. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
67% A Delicate Balance (1973) [A Delicate Balance has] a cast of stars that not even excesses of makeup and hideous costume design can transform into mutually related characters. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
93% The Long Goodbye (1973) The result, with some offbeat and thereby excellent casting, with the lagniappe of multi-leveled satire on the genre and its period, is a first-rate suspense melodrama. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
79% Papillon (1973) It drags on for two-and-a-half hours... to show us that the talents of even Dustin Hoffman and Steve McQueen can be buried under endless restatement of the obvious and that the best of adventure stories can be attenuated into boredom. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
No Score Yet Alfredo, Alfredo (1972) There's an overwhelming fondness for his foolish creatures that permeates [Pietro Germi's] films and makes Alfredo Alfredo a joy. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
91% Fantastic Planet (1973) Humor and pathos underline a fine adventure story. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 28, 2020
95% An Autumn Afternoon (1964) No Hitchcock McGuffin, no Sleuth-like turnabout can surpass the suspense that Ozu builds slowly and subtly to crisis and climax. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
33% Hitler: The Last Ten Days (1973) The genius of Guinness' impersonation is that he manages not only the moments of urbanity but also, grotesquely enough, of the charm that must have enthralled those who dedicated their lives to him. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
92% Paper Moon (1973) [Paper Moon] is exactly what we have in mind when we talk nostalgically of what movies "used to be"--meaningful rather than metaphorical, engrossing rather than exploitative, humanistic in their comedy and their sentiment. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
No Score Yet Tom Sawyer (1973) And you have to have a passel of kids around you... to know that there's a children's classic at hand and that you can double your pleasure in adulthood by knowing the generations are ungapped thereby. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
20% Lost Horizon (1973) The musical aspects are the most disastrous because the cast is a first-rate one in straight performance. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
No Score Yet The Nelson Affair (Bequest to the Nation) (1973) This is the kind of "historical" that transports one in time to encounter timeless truths about people. And therein is the satisfaction. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
36% Ludwig (1973) There is no apparent intelligence in the way all this has been stuck together, let alone the way in which mind-shriveling dialogue has been assigned various mouths. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
No Score Yet Lady Caroline Lamb (1972) The result is a creakingly old-fashioned costume melodrama splattered with historic facts that succeed only in clashing with the fiction. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
85% Last Tango in Paris (1972) [Brando provides] two sequences of such power, of such piercing emotional intensity and perception, that he brings an aura of greatness to the entire film. It is, alas, only an aura, for the film is all machismo. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 12, 2020
64% Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood (1973) The winning film of the moment is Under Milk Wood, Andrew Sinclair's beautiful screen adaptation of the Dylan Thomas play, a triumph of visualization of the verbal visions and vignettes the poet created. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
No Score Yet Little Mother (1971) It's all too silly to detail but Metzger fans can rest assured that the quality of his work hasn't changed. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
90% Cries and Whispers (1972) The cumulative moments, the reality of each fantasy and the phantasmagoria of existence combine for a work of genius -- certainly the most complex, the most perceptive and the most humane of Bergman's works to date. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
71% Bone (1972) Cohen has over-loaded his plotting with a jerkily edited-in sub-theme involving the couple's son; too many of his scenes last several minutes too long. But his concept is a biting and clever one, his insights fresh and bold, his characters refreshing. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
No Score Yet Innocent Bystanders (1972) The whole thing is as incredible as it is unappetizing. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
96% Sleuth (1972) The transition of Sleuth from stage to screen is more than a matter of "opening" the scene (and what an opening that garden maze provides for the film!). - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
29% The Mechanic (1972) It is a banal expedition into slaughter and sadism and stupid dialogue. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
73% The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds (1972) Paul Newman's second film as director, The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds, based on Paul Zindel's 1971 Pulitzer Prize play, not only confirms his abilities but, with a screenplay by Alvin Sargent, transcends the original. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
57% Travels With My Aunt (1972) You'll have a wonderful trip with Travels. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
86% The Getaway (1972) It's fast, furious, full of shoot-outs and car chases, lovely little side-forays into suspense and irony, and tidbits of genuine humor. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
80% The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean (1972) It's all very movie-movie, with even that happy ending we schmaltz-lovers love so well. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
50% Man of La Mancha (1973) If you are a la Mancha devotee, you will love the film: if you were cool, or unaware, you will find a surprisingly good entertainment on hand, with stars well worth the gazing. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
100% Heat (1972) Morrissey proves himself a filmmaker on the way up and well worth watching in the process. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
91% Chloe in the Afternoon (L'amour l'après-midi) (1972) Rohmer's gift is in his subtle differentiation between the cliches of relationships and the eternal verities that are at the heart of those cliches. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
98% The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie (Le Charme Discret de la Bourgeoisie) (1972) Luis Bunuel's The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie is a deliciously pungent concoction by the 72-year-old filmmaker and his young co-scenarist, Jean-Claude Carriere, that will set your spirits soaring and your mind aglow. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
100% Day for Night (1973) [Day for Night is] universal in its sheer humanism, its exuberance, its tragic-comic view of people and events, and completely irresistible in its sheer love of the life it leads. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
No Score Yet A Doll's House (1973) [An] excellent cinematic version of the lbsen work, filmed in Norway, with a fine cast and a commendably literate screenplay by David Mercer. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
17% Diary of Forbidden Dreams (1973) Polanski and his pals may have had a fine time cavorting around the villa but it's not catching on a 112 minutes of film. - Texas Monthly EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 11, 2020
87% Bonnie and Clyde (1967) Naturalism -- in characters and background -- is the mark of this film in its technical perfections. Saturated in time and place, we are left with the universality of the theme and its particular contemporary relevance. - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
60% Our Mother's House (1967) Dirk Bogarde creates an unforgettable character as the vulgar, sinister, and somehow appealing "father" who invades the children's world. - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
No Score Yet The Penthouse (1967) [The Penthouse] made a splash at the Berlin Film Festival (if muck can make a spash). - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
57% Games (1967) Pretentiously posh and pointless nonsense. - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
No Score Yet The Tiger Makes Out (1967) The result is an attractive and bemusing piece of costume jewelry -- but not comparable to the real thing. - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
64% Far From the Madding Crowd (1967) I expected a movie to make me stand up and cheer or at least sit up and take notice. Instead it's curl-up and doze-fitfully time. - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
100% Smashing Time (1967) It's on beat and offbeat, a Mod film that makes the most of the Mack Sennett tradition, a satire on swinging London that swings to its own London rhythm. - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
No Score Yet The Thief of Paris (Le Voleur) (1967) With The Thief of Paris Louis Malle once again proves himself not only one of the more thoughtful of the New Wave filmmakers but also one of the more versitile. - Vogue EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
91% Something Wild (1986) The end's not unexpected, and the soundtrack's overloaded with songs, but once Something Wild gets really wild -- with Daniels and Griffith and Demme's fringe comedy at their best -- the movie makes its mark as offbeat entertainment. - WWOR-TV (NJ) EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 25, 2020
No Score Yet The Lost Man (1969) The emphasis is on the suspense story -- and we will, I suppose, have to settle for being grateful that it is wrapped in contemporary terms. - New York Magazine/Vulture EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 31, 2019