Movie Reviews Only

T-Meter Title | Year
100% Collective (Colectiv) (2020) It sketches out an honest, affecting, somewhat old-fashioned utopian example of what it takes to make the world better, or at least a little less awful. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 19, 2020
68% Dreamland (2019) It's a lot of hooey and might have been at least tolerable if the movie had been rougher, meaner, tighter, and if the filmmakers... had never watched a Terrence Malick movie. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Nov 12, 2020
100% City Hall (2020) I could have watched hours more of people simply talking to one another in auditoriums and across conference-room tables. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 28, 2020
50% The Witches (2020) There's more heart in the new version and more emotion, qualities which can go missing in those Zemeckis movies that get lost in his technical whiz-bangery. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 22, 2020
97% David Byrne's American Utopia (2020) Some filmed stage shows die on the screen from a sheer lack of visual energy and invention. Lee, a master of the art, uses cinema's plasticity to complement this production, making it come alive in two dimensions. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
83% Martin Eden (2020) The true miracle of this film is how Marcello translates both London's scabrous tone and his lush, character-revealing prose into pure cinema. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 15, 2020
81% Charm City Kings (2020) Things happen and then more things happen, little of it surprising. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 8, 2020
86% On The Rocks (2020) Coppola's minimalism can be frustratingly rather than productively diffuse, but her aesthetic reserve suits this story and the diffidence of her heroine. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2020
100% Dick Johnson Is Dead (2020) Pitched artfully between the celebratory and the elegiac, it is an inarguably serious documentary with light, surrealistic flourishes that, at times, veer into exuberant goofiness. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Oct 1, 2020
84% Misbehaviour (2020) It... has a toothless vision of protest and empowerment that's doomed to fail its subject because its makers don't (can't) risk making the audience uncomfortable. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 24, 2020
64% The Devil All the Time (2020) There is little sense that the people in this world do anything but suffer or cause others to suffer in between working, church going and occasionally popping out babies. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 16, 2020
97% Buoyancy (2020) [Rathjen] doesn't find spurious poetry in other people's pain or try to glean greater meaning from it. He knows that the suffering is meaning enough. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 10, 2020
74% Mulan (2020) Stories about women bravely going against the cultural and social grain can be delectable catnip, and it's no different here. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Sep 3, 2020
87% Get Duked! (2020) There's nothing wrong with poop jokes except when they're not funny and after the first pellet gag the loamy possibilities of this source material diminishes. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 26, 2020
53% Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula (2020) After the gunfire dies down, terror at times gives way to a melancholy that can be quite affecting even if the message remains familiar: We have met the zombie, and it is us. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 20, 2020
60% Project Power (2020) Sugar highs can be fun. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2020
94% Boys State (2020) It's easy to be charmed by "Boys State," which is so good that you wish it were better. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 13, 2020
97% La Llorona (2020) With precise framing, compositional flair and a steady hand, Bustamante layers the story, adding daubs that suggest rather than explain. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Aug 5, 2020
94% Calm with Horses (The Shadow of Violence) (2020) There is just enough ambiguity onscreen, particularly during the movie's early stretch, that the narrative machinery isn't too conspicuous. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 30, 2020
61% Radioactive (2020) "Radioactive" is more provocative and satisfying than the average waxworks, but Satrapi's visual strategies also point to the even more fully adventurous movie that could have been. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 23, 2020
69% Amulet (2020) This is Garai's feature directing debut, and it is as satisfying as it is promising, despite an unfortunate wind down. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 22, 2020
87% The Truth (La vérité) (2020) In "The Truth," the Japanese writer-director Hirokazu Kore-eda wittily toys with Deneuve's persona, its layers and meanings. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jul 3, 2020
100% House of Hummingbird (Beolsae) (2020) It's hard to put something like life onscreen, and harder still to make us care. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 24, 2020
84% Mr. Jones (2020) More than anything, "Mr. Jones" is an argument for witnessing and remembrance. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 18, 2020
94% Babyteeth (2020) "Babyteeth" is such a fragile, earnest and inoffensive thing that I almost feel bad for not liking it more. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jun 18, 2020
No Score Yet Circumstantial Pleasures (2020) No matter how distinct the elements - and how differently arranged - they are of a feverish, profoundly uneasy piece. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 29, 2020
92% The Vast of Night (2020) With the cinematographer Miguel Ioann Littin Menz, Patterson turns the camera into an uneasily embodied presence and when it takes flight so does the movie. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 28, 2020
87% The Trip to Greece (2020) By trying to give "The Trip to Greece" some heft, Winterbottom only draws attention to the series' lack of interest in history, other people, the politics of global tourism and, well, the world. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted May 20, 2020
81% To the Stars (2020) The director Martha Stephens, working from a script by Shannon Bradley-Colleary, handles this material smoothly, creating a solid, tangible sense of place with landscapes, gusts of wind and a blue sky that feels more confining than sheltering. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Apr 23, 2020
99% Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020) Here, a woman's right to self-determination has become the stuff of a new and radical heroic journey. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 12, 2020
72% Lost Girls (2020) It's serious, respectful, gravely melancholic. Yet anger best describes the movie's atmosphere, its overall mood and its authorial tone. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 11, 2020
91% Bacurau (Nighthawk) (2020) Part of what's exciting is how the filmmakers marshal genre in the service of their ideas, using film form to deflect, tease and surprise. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 5, 2020
78% The Banker (2020) For a film about the struggles of a black man in America, "The Banker" spends an awful lot of time on a false white front. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Mar 4, 2020
38% Wendy (2020) Zeitlin - who proves more sentimental about childhood than Barrie - keeps the parts whirring, casting about for meaning that never fully comes. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 27, 2020
91% The Invisible Man (2020) Moss's full-bore performance - anchored by her extraordinarily supple face - gives the movie its emotional stakes. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 26, 2020
87% Emma. (2020) As Emma's plans stutter forward and amusingly slip off course, the filmmakers' mild interventions feel less forced, more organic; even a seductive dance and an importunate nosebleed end up working nicely. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 20, 2020
74% The Photograph (2020) There's so little genuine, starry eyed you-had-me-at-hello romance in American movies today that when a new love story pops up, it's hard not to root for it. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2020
87% I Was at Home, But... (Ich war zuhause, aber...) (2020) In most mainstream cinema, the story tugs you along - or prods you into its mazelike corridors and toward dead ends - encouraging you to wonder what happens next. Schanelec offers next to no such prompts, trusting that you'll keep watching anyway. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Feb 12, 2020
91% Beanpole (Dylda) (2020) This movie tells a tough, unsparing story about war trauma, which seeps into souls and bodies and inevitably becomes - Balagov suggests - a generational bequest. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 28, 2020
100% I Wish I Knew (Hai shang chuan qi) (2020) Jia is building not just a portrait of a city, but of a fragmented people - one story and memory at a time. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 23, 2020
75% The Gentlemen (2020) Gives you exactly what you might expect from a Guy Ritchie movie that hasn't been constrained by studio decorousness (and ratings) or suavely tricked out with big-Hollywood cash. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 22, 2020
91% Weathering with You (2020) As streets, homes, rooms and faces hurtle by, a textured world emerges detail by detail, one that looks like life yet is also expressionistic. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 16, 2020
13% Dolittle (2020) At some point during its troubled gestation, the movie once known as "The Voyage of Doctor Dolittle" was renamed "Dolittle"... it's too bad that the rest of this movie couldn't have been ditched as well, or at least dramatically shortened. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 15, 2020
22% Like a Boss (2020) It's a bummer to see all this talent so badly abused. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 9, 2020
88% Earth (Erde) (2019) It can be tough going. Yet, despite its apocalyptic visions, it feels curiously optimistic because Geyrhalter hasn't given up on us. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Jan 8, 2020
89% 1917 (2020) A carefully organized and sanitized war picture... that turns one of the most catastrophic episodes in modern times into an exercise in preening showmanship. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 24, 2019
20% Cats (2019) Without the presence of hard-working troupers in fun fur in this "Cats," all that's left are canned images of fit-looking people meowing and raising their rumps high in the air. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2019
83% Midsommar (2019) After a while, an unproductive restlessness sets in as you wait for the characters to matter as much as the silky moves and painstaking details. Horror - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 18, 2019
92% Uncut Gems (2019) It doesn't seem to add up to much - a little man lives his life - but this is just enough. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2019
68% Bombshell (2019) Here's the thing about sexism: It doesn't discriminate. It's an equal opportunity prejudice that cuts across history, culture, political affiliation. "Bombshell" gets this. - New York Times EDIT
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2019