Penelope Houston Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Penelope Houston

Penelope Houston
Penelope Houston's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Sight and Sound, The Spectator, Monthly Film Bulletin

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
97% If.... (1968) What makes this part of the film so compelling is less its details, though much of that is striking, than its mood.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
91% How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1967) It least as funny as the old gamesmanship routines, and amiably dedicated to the proposition that any true company man is a rabbit in weasel's clothing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
80% A Man for All Seasons (1966) The intention, I take it, is to steer us into seeing the drama as something universal, to draw what modern parallels we choose. And if this is so, it seems to me misguided.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Me, Natalie (1969) Director, Fred Coe, has the trick of making fearfully unpromising characters... more humanly bearable than the situation really warrants. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Capricious Summer (1967) A slight film, often funny, faithful to its oblique and muted insights.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
47% Camelot (1967) To take all three hours, one probably needs a fairly tireless addiction to knights, toy castles, rapt pauses and battlefield farewells.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
50% Billion Dollar Brain (1967) Scrambled technique has the effect of a series of evasive mannerisms, to keep anyone from meeting the story head-on.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet The Moment of Truth (1952) Rosi's method limits him to stating a case; though Gianni di Venanzo's color camerawork, even in the oddly wan print on show here, puts it glitteringly. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
93% Hombre (1967) Strikes a not very satisfactory balance between traditionalist themes... and interludes for reflection on race prejudice and so on.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
27% Casino Royale (1967) If Casino Royale has what passes for its heart set on dealing the final death-blow to a n over-worked legend, how sad that it didn't perform the necessary obsequies with style. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
92% Petulia (1968) You may not greatly take to Petulia, but don't miss it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
14% I Love You, Alice B. Toklas (1968) This dimly predictable comedy tries to have its hashish cake and eat it several times over.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet They Came to Rob Las Vegas (Las Vegas, 500 millones) (1968) They Came to Rob Las Vegas carries the dehumanized thrill to a rather splendid ultimate. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Come Play With Me (Grazie, Zia) (1968) The film has a perverse, secretive, independent wit.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
67% Too Late the Hero (1970) One might have thought that one Dirty Dozen was enough for a filmmaking career. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
94% The Boys in the Band (1970) The combination of schoolgirl confessional... with a discernible element of holier-than-thou voyeurism does give off a certain sliminess.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet The Last Grenade (1970) [A] curiously old-fashioned yarn.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
60% If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium (1969) Falls well short of the flip promise of its title.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
100% Kes (1969) It is a genuine, resolute little film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Twisted Nerve (1969) The real trouble is not that the film is horrific, but that its notion of shock value seems so blatantly calculated in their and so lame, decrepit and unalparming in practice.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Dance of the Vampires (2011) Polanski had something in mind which never found its way to the screen. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
94% The Wild Bunch (1969) Peckinpah plaits simple strands into an intricate pattern of contradictions and moral ambiguities.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet The Strawberry Statement (1970) Hagmann, got hist training in TV commercials; and all too often it shows through in the flashings and zoomings... the narcissistic awareness of the charm of youth. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
85% M*A*S*H (1970) Tends to slide about like a joke book on a rollercoaster, taking its dark laughter more or less where it finds it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet Entertaining Mr. Sloane (1970) Leaves no snigger unsung, blandly disregarding the fact that the dialogue of Orton's wayward original... calls for something daily rigorous. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet Negatives (1968) The two women only really exist as a misogynist's dream figures revolving around the man.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
60% Hot Millions (1968) One of those comic boardroom fairy-tales (man bites computer) which never seem to quite achieve basic persuadability.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
74% Barbarella (1968) Barbarella is a gift-wrapped 'X' certificate bonbon for a space age nursery.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
85% Faces (1968) This wry, obstinate and fiercely independent film remains an actor's work. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet My Way Home (1965) Jancso was an ethnology student before he became a filmmaker. He seems to have retained the most useful kind of curiosity about how people do what they do. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet The Night of the Generals (1967) The producer, Sam Spiegel, and director, Anatole Litvak hurl themselves at all this with rather fretful intensity, as though persuaded that out of such huffing and puffing a significant statement must emerge... it doesn't. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet Obyknovennyy fashizm (Triumph Over Violence) (1968) Romm's film has its points, and perhaps had rather more when shown as originally made... which I'm told wasn't so devoted to self-defeating sarcasm. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet Mourir √† Madrid (To Die in Madrid) (1963) It is surprising how little really dramatic footage this incredibly dramatic war seems to have yielded. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
40% Girl on a Motorcycle (1968) (1968) The price in vulgarity is on the high side for a few misplaced laughs. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet As Long As You're Healthy (Tant Qu'on A La Sante) (1966) [Etaix] doesn't manage to keep half enough of the bad jokes down. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
92% Gone With the Wind (1939) There is a kind of dispassionate confidence in the film's own destiny: the last tycoon, making the last of the dinosaurs. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
77% The Thomas Crown Affair (1968) Norman Jewison and his cameraman Haskell Wexler... seem to have let photographic prettiness go completely to their heads.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet Report on the Party and the Guests (1968) Nemec's ideas are pin-sharp.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
93% Funny Girl (1968) In Barbra Streisand Funny Girl thumps down an ace.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
100% La Chinoise (1968) Only Godard could make a film so theoretical and so waywardly, persistently about people. Only Godard, certainly, could make this film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2018
90% The Firemen's Ball (1968) Although the film is enormously engaging, its humour is by no means all comfortable; nor is it meant to be.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2018
100% Partner (1968) A maddening film; lashings of talent.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2018
43% Sympathy for the Devil (One Plus One) (1968) Godard has got nearer than most people ever do to recording history with a camera. This chapter reads like the record of a hiatus, a dictatorial dialogue with futility.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2018
90% Midnight Cowboy (1969) A pair of performances of the highest calibre: funny, sensitive and finely adjusted to indicate the abject simple- mindedness that is their constant tripwire.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2018
No Score Yet The Boat (1921) The Boat is superbly, ceaselessly comic, in its hero's imperturbably practical and unsurprised reaction to catastrophe.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2018
No Score Yet The Lost Man (1969) Robert Alan Aurthur, who begins as though he might have something to say about extremism versus non violent protest on the picket-line, loses it rather rapidly down the melodramatic dark alleys.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2018
89% Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) Such an amiable and ingenious movie that it seems curmudgeonly to get on any critical high horse.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2018
40% The Honey Pot (1967) Rex Harrison and Maggie Smith take over the playing leaps to Wimbledon finalist standard.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2018
94% Yukinojo Henge (An Actor's Revenge) (1971) Glittering and inscrutable.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2018
97% Chimes at Midnight (1965) The bones are impressively strong and simple.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2018