Penelope Houston Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Penelope Houston

Penelope Houston
Penelope Houston's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Sight and Sound, The Spectator, Monthly Film Bulletin

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
No Score Yet Tell Me Lies (1968) That last shot, so self-indulgent and so wrong.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
No Score Yet All The Way Up (1970) I'm not sure that these gloating celebrations of tastelessness... aren't much more socially hazardous than mere horror movies, in which eating people is still wrong.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
97% Night of the Living Dead (1968) A slightly tacky horror picture which makes quite an impact; partly, I suspect, by ingeniously playing off its own limitations.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
97% Yojimbo (1961) Kurosawa's laconic awareness of the brusque farce of violence, and the permanence of melancholy, holds the film on a special balance between laughter and severity.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
No Score Yet The Gypsy Moths (1969) It is a sympathetic piece of quiet movie-making, a bit undersized perhaps for John Frankenheimer but certainly not such a tiddler as to make one feel he should have thrown it back.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
No Score Yet Adalen '31 (Adalen Riots) (1999) Widerberg can manage... to make the sense of happiness absolutely direct and tangible.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
88% True Grit (1969) True Grit depends on that simple, no doubt reprehensible (at least emphatic- ally illiberal), irrepressibly amiable star image the cinema is supposed to have out- grown.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
No Score Yet La chamade (Heartbeat) (1969) Distinctly soothing: a Scotch-flavored lollipop.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
13% The Arrangement (1969) As soon as the characters begin the laborious process of self-analysis, the parade of guilts and obsessions could be marshaled and set in action by any halfway assiduous reader of Time magazine.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
No Score Yet The Reckoning (1969) The Reckoning has energy enough to drive through some of its now indecisions.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
83% Ring of Bright Water (1969) The humans, again as usual, are required to do mildly idiotic things.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
71% The Killing of Sister George (1968) It's Beryl Reid and Susannah York drifting dismasted towards caricature.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
90% Teorema (Theorem) (1968) A very extraordinary piece of work.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
No Score Yet The Jokers (1967) Resilient script... erratic direction, in the fashionable jumping-bean, all over the place style.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
71% You Only Live Twice (1967) No samurai armour; no suicide garden; not much really of Fleming's bizarre, obsessive travelogue.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
No Score Yet Hoffman (1970) It has lost an essential claustrophobic quality in its transition from compact TV play to almost two-hour film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
20% Cromwell (1970) The script [has] bitten off a more complex slice of history than it can hope to chew.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
20% MacKenna's Gold (1969) Sagging and sprawling all over the landscape.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
77% Oh! What A Lovely War (1969) It may seem churlish to praise a film one admires not so much for what it gets right as for what it manages to avoid getting wrong. But Oh! What a Lovely War is perhaps a special case.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
97% If.... (1968) What makes this part of the film so compelling is less its details, though much of that is striking, than its mood.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
91% How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (1967) It least as funny as the old gamesmanship routines, and amiably dedicated to the proposition that any true company man is a rabbit in weasel's clothing.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
80% A Man for All Seasons (1966) The intention, I take it, is to steer us into seeing the drama as something universal, to draw what modern parallels we choose. And if this is so, it seems to me misguided.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Me, Natalie (1969) Director, Fred Coe, has the trick of making fearfully unpromising characters... more humanly bearable than the situation really warrants. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Capricious Summer (1967) A slight film, often funny, faithful to its oblique and muted insights.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
47% Camelot (1967) To take all three hours, one probably needs a fairly tireless addiction to knights, toy castles, rapt pauses and battlefield farewells.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
50% Billion Dollar Brain (1967) Scrambled technique has the effect of a series of evasive mannerisms, to keep anyone from meeting the story head-on.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet The Moment of Truth (1952) Rosi's method limits him to stating a case; though Gianni di Venanzo's color camerawork, even in the oddly wan print on show here, puts it glitteringly. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
93% Hombre (1967) Strikes a not very satisfactory balance between traditionalist themes... and interludes for reflection on race prejudice and so on.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
27% Casino Royale (1967) If Casino Royale has what passes for its heart set on dealing the final death-blow to a n over-worked legend, how sad that it didn't perform the necessary obsequies with style. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
92% Petulia (1968) You may not greatly take to Petulia, but don't miss it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
14% I Love You, Alice B. Toklas (1968) This dimly predictable comedy tries to have its hashish cake and eat it several times over.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet They Came to Rob Las Vegas (Las Vegas, 500 millones) (1968) They Came to Rob Las Vegas carries the dehumanized thrill to a rather splendid ultimate. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Come Play With Me (Grazie, Zia) (1968) The film has a perverse, secretive, independent wit.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
67% Too Late the Hero (1970) One might have thought that one Dirty Dozen was enough for a filmmaking career. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
94% The Boys in the Band (1970) The combination of schoolgirl confessional... with a discernible element of holier-than-thou voyeurism does give off a certain sliminess.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet The Last Grenade (1970) [A] curiously old-fashioned yarn.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
60% If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium (1969) Falls well short of the flip promise of its title.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
100% Kes (1969) It is a genuine, resolute little film.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Twisted Nerve (1969) The real trouble is not that the film is horrific, but that its notion of shock value seems so blatantly calculated in their and so lame, decrepit and unalparming in practice.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet Dance of the Vampires (2011) Polanski had something in mind which never found its way to the screen. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
94% The Wild Bunch (1969) Peckinpah plaits simple strands into an intricate pattern of contradictions and moral ambiguities.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 17, 2018
No Score Yet The Strawberry Statement (1970) Hagmann, got hist training in TV commercials; and all too often it shows through in the flashings and zoomings... the narcissistic awareness of the charm of youth. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
85% M*A*S*H (1970) Tends to slide about like a joke book on a rollercoaster, taking its dark laughter more or less where it finds it.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet Entertaining Mr. Sloane (1970) Leaves no snigger unsung, blandly disregarding the fact that the dialogue of Orton's wayward original... calls for something daily rigorous. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet Negatives (1968) The two women only really exist as a misogynist's dream figures revolving around the man.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
60% Hot Millions (1968) One of those comic boardroom fairy-tales (man bites computer) which never seem to quite achieve basic persuadability.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
74% Barbarella (1968) Barbarella is a gift-wrapped 'X' certificate bonbon for a space age nursery.‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
86% Faces (1968) This wry, obstinate and fiercely independent film remains an actor's work. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
No Score Yet My Way Home (1965) Jancso was an ethnology student before he became a filmmaker. He seems to have retained the most useful kind of curiosity about how people do what they do. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018
40% The Night of the Generals (1967) The producer, Sam Spiegel, and director, Anatole Litvak hurl themselves at all this with rather fretful intensity, as though persuaded that out of such huffing and puffing a significant statement must emerge... it doesn't. ‐ The Spectator
Read More | Posted Jul 16, 2018