Ryan Gilbey Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Ryan Gilbey

Ryan Gilbey
Ryan Gilbey's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Guardian, Independent (UK), Sight and Sound, Observer (UK), Heat Magazine, New Statesman

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
100% The Heiresses (Las Herederas) (2018) The Heiresses is nothing so demonstrative as a worm-that-turned story, and it's all the better for that. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Aug 8, 2018
100% Apostasy (2017) Apostasy is muted: hushed, still, almost colourless. But don't let that fool you. Its pain is all the more distressing for being muffled.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 25, 2018
97% Mission: Impossible - Fallout (2018) It has become everything that recent Bond films have failed to be: fun but not dumb, serious but not glum, frantic yet always lucid, and with an array of dynamic roles for women.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 25, 2018
45% Generation Wealth (2018) Greenfield has shaped the new film into a self-analytical retrospective... Greenfield does, however, seem cognisant of her own wounds. It's just that they're not terribly compelling in the form in which she dramatises them here.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 18, 2018
83% Path of Blood (2018) The knowledge that most of what we're seeing is through Al Qaeda's own eyes lends every shot a macabre chill.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 13, 2018
93% Incredibles 2 (2018) More disappointing than the lack of inspiration here is the taint of corporate bias... A studio that has billions of dollars' worth of skin in the game of flogging sequels, merchandise and theme parks is in no position to issue moral instruction. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 12, 2018
90% The Father of My Children (Le pere de mes enfants) (2010) In muting the warning signs, or allowing them to be absorbed into the bustle of life, Hansen-Løve secures for her film its slow-burning emotional impact. ‐ Sight and Sound
Read More | Posted Jul 10, 2018
88% Frozen River (2008) Melissa Leo must take at least as much credit for the film's successes as her director. She isn't merely tough as old boots - she makes old boots look like ballet shoes.‐ Sight and Sound
Read More | Posted Jul 6, 2018
43% Swimming with Men (2018) Feel-good is declared the winning tone within minutes. The rest of the film is just splashing around in the shallow end.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 5, 2018
100% Leave No Trace (2018) Granik charts the evolution of their relationship in microscopic detail, harvesting from the smallest gestures the sort of emotion that screenwriters spend pages trying to rustle up.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 27, 2018
77% In the Fade (Aus dem Nichts) (2017) [Diane Kruger] has an instinct for subtlety that isn't always mirrored in her director, whose appetite for melodrama or contrivance can be destabilising... You don't cast someone as deft as Kruger and then augment her work with gimmicks.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 20, 2018
89% Hereditary (2018) It's poorly paced, with a making-it-up-as-we-go feel; there's a difference between slow-burn and merely slow, and [director Ari] Aster hasn't grasped it yet.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2018
74% The Happy Prince (2018) A role like this presents a particular challenge for Everett... If his performance as Wilde comes off, it is because as a director he has built the film to compensate for his own shortcomings.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 13, 2018
96% Studio 54 (2018) Despite drawing some dubious conclusions about the club's demise, the filmmakers harvest enough novel footage to justify another airing.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2018
100% McQueen (2018) It is caught between rejoicing in the era's excess and mourning its effect on the man who embodied it. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 6, 2018
95% Zama (2018) The film puts us in a trance, too: one of bewildered, bottomless wonder. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 23, 2018
95% Filmworker (2018) The interviewees in Filmworker are lit unflatteringly and not always asked the most pertinent of questions... But some of them offer telling glimpses of how this relationship looked from the outside. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 21, 2018
68% On Chesil Beach (2018) Self-sabotagingly tasteful and fatally polite; so unwilling to take risks that the comforts of convention become preferable to any potentially fulfilling acts of boldness.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 21, 2018
71% Solo: A Star Wars Story (2018) Might have looked more at home on the smaller screen... It's a pedestrian affair, visually flat and dingy, with a plot that amounts to a lot of to-ing and fro-ing without establishing very much.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 16, 2018
92% Revenge (2018) Torture and injury ensue, but nothing is as off-putting as the visual excesses which smack of student film-making beneath the high production values...‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
54% Godard Mon Amour (Le redoutable) (2018) Disciples of Godard will be gritting their teeth... but then Redoubtable isn't really for them.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 15, 2018
94% Beast (2018) Beast is a promising British thriller with fairy-tale overtones.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Apr 27, 2018
77% Funny Cow (2017) And while it's admirable that the film honours its un-PC period setting by having Funny Cow deliver a joke in a comic Pakistani accent, it is unfortunate that nothing the character says, either on or off stage, is remotely amusing. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Apr 13, 2018
98% BPM (Beats Per Minute) (120 battements par minute) (2017) There are elements to admire - committed performances and noble intentions - but as cinema it's a non-starter.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Apr 6, 2018
67% Wonderstruck (2017) Even this visionary director can't make shots of people looking at things (books, museum exhibits) feel compelling, or pass off coincidence as drama.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Apr 6, 2018
40% A Wrinkle in Time (2018) What DuVernay has delivered is essentially a feature-length screensaver which operates on the assumption that cinema for children is a matter of bright colours and dippy sentiment.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2018
84% The Square (2017) The Square is undeniably entertaining, though its lasting use may be to demonstrate that movies can have the same effect as popping a coin in the collecting tin. Having seen the film, you can rest easy knowing you've already given.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 22, 2018
94% A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer fantástica) (2018) From the moment the camera catches sight of the singer Marina Vidal in a Santiago hotspot, where she brings panache to a salsa-infused torch song, it is fully captivated and so are we.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 8, 2018
89% I, Tonya (2018) Craig Gillespie directs with all the subtlety of a baton-wielding thug but has made at least one brilliant decision in casting Margot Robbie, who is practically a machine for generating empathy.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 1, 2018
99% Lady Bird (2017) The densely packed detail which makes this such a luminous work shows Gerwig to be an uncommonly alert filmmaker.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Feb 22, 2018
92% The Shape of Water (2017) Refreshingly, the film doesn't shy away from its characters' desires... The Shape of Water spells out in letters taller than the Empire State Building exactly what Fay Wray and King Kong wanted to do all along.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2018
97% Black Panther (2018) [The] script adheres to the usual genre formula of tomfoolery, in-jokes, mythology and outright poppycock, but their knack for teasing emotional resonance out of standard scenarios gives them the edge over predecessors and competitors alike.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2018
91% Phantom Thread (2018) If Phantom Thread has a problem, it is that it's so full of fraught confrontations, even those that are outwardly genteel, that it sometimes feels more like a compilation of outstanding scenes than a great movie.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Feb 1, 2018
87% The Post (2018) The film wrings a fair amount of tension and nostalgia from what is essentially a string of meetings in smoky rooms, though it stints on analysis and ends with a limp punchline.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2018
97% Coco (2017) The film has a galloping rhythm, and the animation is scrupulous and ravishing, from its smallest details to its limitless landscapes.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jan 25, 2018
85% Darkest Hour (2017) The script has been written with the caps lock on and Joe Wright directs accordingly.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jan 18, 2018
92% Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (2017) The result suggests a greeting card spattered with gore. Beneath the little flecks of brain and bone, the Hallmark logo is unmistakable.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jan 18, 2018
84% The Final Year (2018) This is not what the director Greg Barker and his colleagues set out to make, so all they can do is contemplate the wreckage and wonder what went wrong, rather than take control of the narrative themselves and mould it into any kind of coherent lesson.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jan 18, 2018
77% All the Money in the World (2017) Save for a pair of performances of absorbing resolve from Plummer and Michelle Williams, it will take its place in history as a pub-quiz question, a footnote to a scandal.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jan 4, 2018
17% Terminal Velocity (1994) As a wise-cracking sky-diving instructor, Charlie Sheen wears his usual look of someone who has just been asked a really difficult question (like: how come your career has lasted this long?).‐ Independent on Sunday
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
67% Dumb and Dumber (1994) What makes this fantasy of anti-social behaviour so painfully funny, is the gulf between etiquette and vulgarity, the desire to be a child whooping it up in the adult world.‐ Independent on Sunday
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
77% Blue Sky (1994) Watching Lange and Jones together is like being caught in sheet lightning.‐ Independent on Sunday
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
38% An Awfully Big Adventure (1995) The most startling thing here is Hugh Grant as a De Sade in luvvy's clothing. Grant embroiders him with impeccable details, while writer Charles Wood, adapting Beryl Bainbridge's novel, conveys the basics with admirable economy.‐ Independent on Sunday
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
82% Molly's Game (2018) Few screenwriters are quite so in love with their own prose as Sorkin; on and on it goes, faster than the speed of screwball but with none of the wit. Molly's Game is his directing debut but he's a dead loss.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
91% The Disaster Artist (2017) It's entertaining, if framed and cut a touch manically.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
91% Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) No one could mistake The Last Jedi for an outstanding contribution to cinema, or even to escapism, but it has its attractions.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Dec 12, 2017
69% Happy End (2017) What he (Haneke) does very well is expose the areas where class, race, economics and morality intersect revealingly.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 30, 2017
19% Daddy's Home 2 (2017) Gibson could scarcely hope to play a character more like himself if he landed the lead in The Mel Gibson Story.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 29, 2017
85% Ingrid Goes West (2017) The picture's greatest asset is its star and producer, Aubrey Plaza, who has a name like a suburban shopping mall and a face like sarcasm personified.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 20, 2017
80% The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) Eerie gliding camerawork, warmly tasteful lighting and a uniformly affectless acting style conspire to prevent us noticing how steeply the stakes have escalated.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017