Ryan Gilbey Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Ryan Gilbey

Ryan Gilbey
Ryan Gilbey's reviews only count toward the Tomatometer when published at the following Tomatometer-approved publication(s): Guardian, Independent (UK), Sight and Sound, Observer (UK), Heat Magazine, New Statesman

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
78% The Killing of a Sacred Deer (2017) Eerie gliding camerawork, warmly tasteful lighting and a uniformly affectless acting style conspire to prevent us noticing how steeply the stakes have escalated.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
89% 78/52: Hitchcock's Shower Scene (2017) The calibre of interviewees and the level of their insights in Alexandre O. Philippe's film is on the distinctly variable side, closer to one of those I Love... nostalgia-fests that are used to pad out the television schedules than to something valuable.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
95% The Florida Project (2017) Baker's work with his largely inexperienced cast is relaxed and playful, and the film's tone is fairly assured.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 16, 2017
100% Paddington 2 (2018) But it works. The inclusive, plainly pro-immigration stance of the original 2014 film is carried over here and multiplied, with a welcome anti-Brexit message.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 10, 2017
98% Call Me by Your Name (2017) The achievement of the director Luca Guadagnino is to create in the absence of any obvious opposition a picture that is still taut with inner tensions.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
97% The Death of Stalin (2017) Playing it straight is the secret. Turn down the volume and the picture would resemble any costume drama. Crank it back up again and the air becomes saltier than the Seregovo mine.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 26, 2017
93% The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) (2017) You need a big screen to savour these effects as well as these performances, particularly Sandler, who discovers deep pockets of vulnerability in his familiar comic rage, and the aptly-named Marvel, who is one.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 19, 2017
87% Blade Runner 2049 (2017) The film is no less sombre than its predecessor, and the glacial pace at which the characters walk and talk indicates that they know this full well. But the ideas aren't complex enough to justify the time spent unpicking them.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 5, 2017
87% Robot & Frank (2012) Robot & Frank, on the other hand, is a tonic of a film: it's all understatement. The whimsical but whip-smart tone suggests a liveaction version of a Pixar movie‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2017
62% Broken (2013) At least a soap opera has the luxury of spreading its quota of sensationalism over many years. Concertinaed into a time span of mere days and distributed among only three households, the litany of suffering in Broken can appear hysterical.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2017
77% A Late Quartet (2012) A Late Quartet is a terrible film-it's like an idiots' Amour. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2017
76% The Spirit of '45 (2013) That The Spirit of '45 survives its simplifications is due to the sincerity and urgency of Loach's argument. And, regrettably, to its pertinence.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2017
68% Trance (2013) In the end, it's the unnecessary tricksiness of the film that halts its flow. A crucial human component is missing. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Oct 3, 2017
76% Borg vs McEnroe (Borg McEnroe) (2017) The temptation in biographical drama to reduce the subjects to simple psychological flashpoints should be resisted by anyone hoping to operate on an artistic plane higher than the average TV movie.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 28, 2017
68% mother! (2017) The film is a one-size-fits-all allegory, gloriously visceral in the moment but too easily decoded to endure.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 21, 2017
87% Wind River (2017) Most of the dialogue would look good on a series of commemorative tea towels. It certainly doesn't belong on the lips of an actor as gifted as Renner.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 14, 2017
99% God's Own Country (2017) In the crepuscular light of Brexit, the film resembles a symbolic appeal for tenderness at a time of instability, even if it is really something altogether more conventional: a love story against the odds.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Sep 7, 2017
83% Detroit (2017) It is a harrowing, relentless and intensely angry movie. As it should be.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Aug 31, 2017
77% Final Portrait (2017) The film's faint drama percolates pleasingly during the face-offs between artist and sitter.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Aug 24, 2017
76% Atomic Blonde (2017) Even an actor as good as Theron can't turn a set of cynical commercial considerations into a character.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Aug 17, 2017
50% England Is Mine (2017) I don't think the makers of England Is Mine deserve our generosity. Their film is drably literal-minded in the obvious connections it draws between the artist and his life.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Aug 3, 2017
92% Dunkirk (2017) The picture is distinguished by a knack for undercutting genre conventions without diminishing them emotionally.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 20, 2017
60% Despicable Me 3 (2017) I have no wish to see any more movies featuring the Minions but I'd make an exception for a crossover project in which they were pitted against the Brood for a fight to the death.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
78% The Beguiled (2017) Sofia Coppola can't help but bring one refreshing element: a female eye. The camera in her version of The Beguiled expresses and inhabits the women's isolation... while her delicate touch as a director keeps the mood frisky even at its most fraught.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jul 14, 2017
86% Okja (2017) It will be a forgiving audience indeed that doesn't recoil from this approach, which is too much stick and not enough carrot.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 29, 2017
62% Slack Bay (Ma loute) (2017) By encouraging famously subtle actors to give recklessly over-the-top performances, the director distances their characters sharply from the world they inhabit.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 16, 2017
73% Berlin Syndrome (2017) No one who sees Shortland's movie will be minded to inflict it on their friends, or much thanked if they do.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 15, 2017
94% The Dark Knight (2008) Too much psychology and not enough pop. It's possible to be too serious, you know. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jun 2, 2017
46% Spaceship (2016) The performances are thrillingly uninhibited; don't be surprised if the careers of several future stars are traced back to this film.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 25, 2017
80% Colossal (2017) The Spanish writer-director Nacho Vigalondo is in complete control of his material as he moves between apparently incompatible genres, as well as up and down the emotional register.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 25, 2017
29% King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword (2017) In a poor film, the use of David Beckham in a minor but significant role stands out as an own goal. It's a towering misjudgement and a good example of the way filmmaking for Ritchie is really just an extension of socialising.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 18, 2017
68% Alien: Covenant (2017) What distinguishes Alien: Covenant is its flair in elevating horror beyond the purely physical.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 11, 2017
82% Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017) It's dispiriting to settle down for a Guardians of the Galaxy picture only to find you're watching Field of Dreams with added asteroids.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted May 4, 2017
89% Lady Macbeth (2017) The actors are good enough to convince even when the plot doesn't. A larger problem is that Lady Macbeth grows less psychologically plausible the higher the body count rises.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Apr 20, 2017
98% I Am Not Your Negro (2017) The result is not a documentary about Baldwin but a vision of America through his appalled and compassionate eyes.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Apr 6, 2017
94% Neruda (2016) It's a clever, analytical film, as opposed to an absorbing one, which holds a funhouse mirror up to its subject in place of a looking-glass.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Apr 6, 2017
66% Free Fire (2017) Brie Larson, Cillian Murphy and Armie Hammer can be glimpsed amid the smoke and dust, but in the absence of any distinguishable characters it scarcely matters that we have a hard time working out who is firing at whom.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 31, 2017
45% Ghost in the Shell (2017) Ghost in the Shell is a largely humourless affair that draws from the usual reference points, not least Blade Runner.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 31, 2017
87% The Lost City of Z (2017) The dense colours are soaked deep into the grain of the filmstock. They tell a story not available in pixels.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2017
97% Aquarius (2016) Aquarius is a leisurely character study that is also urgently political in its treatment of race, class and commerce.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 29, 2017
80% Personal Shopper (2017) Whether anything remains in the soul of someone whose life is built around the ephemeral and the superficial is a point the picture leaves moot. The irony is that Stewart herself is commandingly deep.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 16, 2017
91% Elle (2016) Elle leaves you feeling shell-shocked, but also rather like you've been tickled.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 9, 2017
92% Certain Women (2016) This is an undemonstrative picture, richer in detail than incident, and ever-so-slightly wholegrain and dull.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Mar 2, 2017
93% Fences (2016) There is a powerful drama here about the legacy of racism but Washington doesn't know how to liberate it from the stage.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
98% Moonlight (2016) Material that should by rights be harrowing has become, in Jenkins's hands, euphoric. ‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Feb 16, 2017
3/5 55% Return to Montauk (2017) Nothing really rings true in Return to Montauk until the pain breaks through and the tears start to flow. Perhaps that's the point.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 15, 2017
5/5 94% A Fantastic Woman (Una mujer fantástica) (2018) It may be a timely film, but it is its timelessness, as well as its depths of compassion, that qualify it as a great one.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 14, 2017
3/5 60% California Dreams (2017) A film that is easier on the eye than the soul.‐ Guardian
Read More | Posted Feb 13, 2017
88% 20th Century Women (2017) 20th Century Women, deeply charming though it is, takes its cues from Dorothea's parenting. It may seem all loosey-goosey but there's a dictatorial streak underneath, as there is in so much US filmmaking, indie or otherwise.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Feb 9, 2017
79% T2 Trainspotting (2017) There's a thin line between depicting nostalgia and succumbing to it, and T2 Trainspotting isn't always on the right side.‐ New Statesman
Read More | Posted Jan 26, 2017