Soraya Nadia McDonald Movie Reviews & Previews - Rotten Tomatoes

Soraya Nadia McDonald

Soraya Nadia McDonald
Soraya Nadia McDonald's reviews do not count toward the Tomatometer. This is not a Tomatometer-approved critic, and this critic's reviews are not published on a Tomatometer-approved publication.

Movie Reviews Only

Rating T-Meter Title | Year Review
92% Thor: Ragnarok (2017) Suffice it to say, Valkyrie is a certified badass.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Nov 2, 2017
83% Marshall (2017) The shortcomings that separate Marshall from Hidden Figures and Loving are the same ones that give it the feeling of a TV movie.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Oct 13, 2017
97% Weiner (2016) It's a fabulously entertaining view from inside a political campaign, giving us a firsthand experience of all the weird, Good Wife-style maneuvering that takes place. ‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
100% T-Rex (2016) It all comes together in a terrific story that makes it impossible not to root for Shields.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
100% Pervert Park (2015) It's a fascinating look at a community of people many would prefer to write off entirely.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
89% Miss Sharon Jones! (2016) An emotional [and] beautifully rendered story.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
95% Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise (2016) It's easy to fall into thinking of the late Maya Angelou as something of a national grandmother when she was so much more than that. Thankfully, Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise, is here to correct that misconception.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
100% Check It (2016) Check It provides a realistic look at the effects of cyclical poverty, prejudice, and homelessness on gay youth. Advocacy groups in the nation's capital are still basking in the victory of the Supreme Court decision on same-sex marriage.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
No Score Yet Dumb: The Story of Big Brother Magazine (2017) In every generation, there's a group of maniacs who insist upon rule-breaking, not in the name of some sort of principled stand for freedom but simply because they're a bunch of roustabout, devil-may-care libertines. ‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
No Score Yet Unacknowledged (2017) [Unacknowledged] will likely leave you feeling uneasy, paranoid and maybe more than a little willing to don a tricornered hat made of Reynolds wrap.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
98% The Fits (2016) If the fits are lemons, caused by metaphorical lead poisoning, then Toni's amazing closing sequence is lemonade.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
46% Free State of Jones (2016) Because Free State of Jones concentrates so singularly on making [Matthew] McConaughey the hero of the film, it ends up being a series of missed opportunities.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
74% Ghostbusters (2016) Frankly, if you're going to make a new Ghostbusters with a female foursome as the leads and you're facing a backlash from clanging dungeons of the woman-hating internet, it seems like it would make for an epic opportunity to troll them.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
72% The Birth of a Nation (2016) One of The Birth of a Nation's biggest weaknesses is that the film's female characters are given little consideration in comparison to their male counterparts. ‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
96% 13th (2016) 13th tells us black Americans are not irrational. They are not making up racism or targeted arrests and police violence. 13th tells us black people are not crazy.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
92% Hidden Figures (2017) The pragmatism that flows through Hidden Figures provides a beacon of hope in a modern era that feels marked by uncertainty and despair.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
92% La La Land (2016) It makes it more difficult to just let something like La La Land just passively wash over you when, however well-intentioned, the film hearkens back to a time when black humanity onscreen was deliberately hamstrung.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
67% Little Boxes (2017) In Little Boxes, there's cause for optimism because Meyer and Howell are doing interesting work that's absolutely necessary and not always easy: interrogating whiteness and the ways it shapes the people of color who encounter it.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
67% The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks (2017) Imagine having to endure the emotional labor of seeing your own story told, without the comfort of knowing that you control it or enjoying compensation for it either. Henrietta Lacks raises questions about ethics, both artistic and biomedical.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
73% Sleight (2017) Maybe it doesn't take a production budget north of $100 million to crank out a superhero film these days.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
85% The Incredible Jessica James (2017) There's a power in seeing a self-aware black woman on screen who simply proceeds through life like she hasn't been defeated by it, like she still feels she can make a difference, like she still believes that the world is hers.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
95% Step (2017) Step is the story of young girls who are beating the odds. After seeing it, I hope audiences remember these girls never should have had to face such odds in the first place.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
99% Whose Streets? (2017) It's a deeply moving work, and the passion of both the filmmakers and their subjects is palpable.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
87% Whitney: Can I Be Me (2017) Whitney lets us know: The demand for sanitized, postracial soothsaying from black stars as the price for success is more than detrimental. It will slowly, softly kill you.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
77% Crown Heights (2017) The film just isn't biting enough to make Warner a mascot for the race-based injustice that pervades the American criminal justice system.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
97% Mudbound (2017) [Dee Rees] lets her films unspool, trusting that viewers will remember and understand the choices she's immersed them in and put the pieces together themselves.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 26, 2017
No Score Yet The Gospel According to André (2017) Documentaries about [people like Andre Talley] aren't just about the costs of being trailblazers. They're more personal than that. Instead, they're about the traumas people carry with them, and the way they infect and influence those around them.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
84% Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami (2017) Frankly, Bloodlight and Bami is an unstructured mess, but it does a fair job of contextualizing [Grace] Jones' art through her Jamaican roots.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
80% The Final Year (2018) The premise sounds about as dry as it gets. But The Final Year turned out to be an interesting film.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
No Score Yet Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart (2017) This woman did not waste time. ‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
94% The Shape of Water (2017) The Shape of Water offers hope that hearts and minds can truly be changed for the better, even in the most stubborn of individuals.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017
86% Battle of the Sexes (2017) The big issue with Battle of the Sexes may just be how much territory it cedes to Riggs, or rather, Carell-as-Riggs, who frankly kinda steals the movie.‐ The Undefeated
Read More | Posted Sep 25, 2017