Look (2007) - Rotten Tomatoes

Look (2007)

TOMATOMETER

AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: Though Adam Rifkin's voyeuristic film sometimes feels like only a clever gimmick, it's for the most part a compelling thriller with political overtones.

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Movie Info

The Post-9/11 world has forever changed our notion of privacy. There are now approximately 30 million surveillance cameras generating more than four billion hours of footage every week in the United States. And, the numbers are only growing. The average American is captured over 200 times a day--in department stores, gas stations, changing rooms, and even public bathrooms. No one is spared from the relentless, unblinking eye of cameras hidden in every nook and cranny of day-to-day life. Shot entirely from the point of view of the security cameras. Adam Rifkin's "Look" follows several interweaving, storylines over the course of a random week in a random city. A high school English teacher tries his best to be a decent husband; a department store floor manager uses the warehouse for more than just storage; a Mini-Mart clerk has big dreams; a lawyer struggles with a sexual dilemma; and two sociopaths thrive on ruining the lives of random strangers. "Look" tells five private stories which unfold before the prying eye of the covert camera to chilling effect. We all choose to hide aspects our lives from those around us, whether it is as benign as picking our noses in an empty elevator or something much darker. "Look" poses the pivotal question: Are we always alone when we think we are?
Rating:
R (for strong sexual content, pervasive language, some violence nad brief drug use)
Genre:
Comedy , Drama
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:
 limited
On DVD:
Runtime:
Studio:

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Cast

Hayes MacArthur
as Tony Gilbert
Jamie McShane
as Barry Krebbs
Spencer Redford
as Sherri Van Haften
Ben Weber
as Marty
Chris Williams (XII)
as George Higgins
Kimberly Quinn
as Anne Krebbs
Ryan Cutrona
as Mr. Bates
Valerie Breiman
as Stephanie
Tom Hodges
as Stuart
John Landis
as Himself
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Critic Reviews for Look

All Critics (35) | Top Critics (11)

The performances feel natural, improvised, and it's easy to believe this is the world we inhabit.

Full Review… | March 27, 2008
Chicago Tribune
Top Critic

If the idea is that we're always being watched, why does it seem that in this movie, no one's really paying attention?

December 20, 2007
AV Club
Top Critic

There are some funny moments, plus occasional nudity and sex, but the joke quickly wears off. What might have worked as a half-hour TV show doesn't suit itself to a feature-length film.

Full Review… | December 14, 2007
New York Post
Top Critic

Orwell would have loved it.

Full Review… | December 14, 2007
New York Daily News
Top Critic

With its emphasis on its interweaving stories, the movie offers no commentary on the phenomenon of increasingly pried-apart privacy, positive or negative.

Full Review… | December 14, 2007
Los Angeles Times
Top Critic

Look, an unsettling, rudely funny but not entirely credible feature by the writer and director Adam Rifkin, is an ensemble narrative for the age of public surveillance.

December 14, 2007
New York Times
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Look

Pretty good, but sometimes I think the techniques end up making it feel even more setup than a normal movie and kind of pulls you out of it. I get the point Rifkin is making with the cameras everywhere, but sometimes that looming message doesn't give the story enough room.

Harrison W
Harrison W
½

The stated intention of "Look" is to show how much time we spend being captured on cameras, by staging the action as if it was being filmed by security cameras. So far, so good. But the movie cheats by including dialogue that would not normally be taped, robbing the movie of any ambiguity that the far superior "Red Road" developed wonderfully. What actually happens with "Look" is that the cameras show how much we lie during the course of a day while the cameras show what the truth is. All the while, we have to ask is anybody watching these images. Probably, since they are occasionally fastforwarded, indicating somebody somewhere is getting bored. The focus of a series of interlocking melodramatic storylines is a shopping mall where Sherri(Spencer Redford) and Holly(Heather Hogan), a pair of vapid teenagers, are trying on clothes in a department store where Tony(Hayes MacArthur), a store manager, is intent on having sex with anything that moves. Sherri will be content with shoplifting and and seducing her English teacher, Mr. Krebbs(Jamie McShane). As bad as some of that sounds, there are worse scenes that are almost impossible to watch while there is one perfect scene in the film that involves a car crash. All of which is emblematic of a low view of human nature with a few exceptions.

Walter M.
Walter M.

Super Reviewer

Short Cuts with surveillance cameras. Unfairly overlooked writer/director Rifkin creates a fascinating film by following multiple characters stories using only footage of them from various forms of video surveillance (I had no idea so much video surveillance cameras recorded audio, but I'm willing to overlook that nitpick because I enjoyed the film so much). Some stories are horrifying and some simply tragic, but all of them are entertaining and well performed. It's a shame this movie never got a decent release, but much like Rifkin's best films, will eventually become hidden gems. And for Dark Backward fans, check out the advertisement on the bus!

Christopher  Brown
Christopher Brown

Super Reviewer

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