The Island of Dr. Moreau Reviews

  • Nov 10, 2020

    Big-budget and star-cast adaptation of H:G. Wells' classic sci-fi novel lands a fascinatingly wild and hilarious fail on almost every level, among which Marlon Brando's ridiculous performance is only one of the many facets you need to see to believe.

    Big-budget and star-cast adaptation of H:G. Wells' classic sci-fi novel lands a fascinatingly wild and hilarious fail on almost every level, among which Marlon Brando's ridiculous performance is only one of the many facets you need to see to believe.

  • Oct 05, 2020

    You'd think that with twenty years to improve this would be better than the '77 version. No such luck

    You'd think that with twenty years to improve this would be better than the '77 version. No such luck

  • Jul 07, 2020

    It earned every drop of the hatred people have for it.

    It earned every drop of the hatred people have for it.

  • May 23, 2020

    After revisiting it’s a Very misunderstood adaptation and highly underrated. The stan Winston creature effects are classic and worth watching for alone.

    After revisiting it’s a Very misunderstood adaptation and highly underrated. The stan Winston creature effects are classic and worth watching for alone.

  • Apr 27, 2020

    I enjoyed it definitely dated but super interesting in my opinion.

    I enjoyed it definitely dated but super interesting in my opinion.

  • Apr 19, 2020

    One of the oddest movies I've seen. But odd can't always sell a movie.

    One of the oddest movies I've seen. But odd can't always sell a movie.

  • Apr 13, 2020

    In 2010, United Nations negotiator Edward Douglas (David Thewlis) survives a plane crash in the Java Sea and is eventually rescued by a passing boat. Aboard, a man called Montgomery (Val Kilmer) tends to him. After telling him the boat has no radio, he promises Douglas the captain will take him to Timor after dropping him off. However, when they arrive at Montgomery's destination referred to as "Moreau's Island", he instead advises Douglas to stay with him, ostensibly so he can use the radio on the island. Montgomery unloads a shipment of rabbits at a pen, and one runs away while he slaughters another for Douglas's meal. They then head on to the Main House where Douglas is warned not to wander. There, he meets a daughter of Dr. Moreau's called Aissa (Fairuza Balk), but Montgomery turns him away from her and leads him to his room. On the way, they discuss how Moreau vanished after becoming obsessed with his animal research. Montgomery locks Douglas in his room, but he manages to escape that night. He then comes across the camp's lab where he witnesses the birth of a mutant baby, belonging to and delivered by human-animal hybrids. He is noticed, escapes, and runs into Aissa who leads him to the village of the mutants. On the way, they find the partially eaten corpse of a rabbit, not far from a leopard hybrid called Lo-Mai (Mark Dacascos). At the village, they find the Sayer of the Law (Ron Perlman) whose Law preaches "being human" in terms of restraint and discipline. Dr. Moreau (Marlon Brando), referred to as "The Father" by the mutants, appears. He controls the villagers by using a remote control that causes pain through an implant under the creatures' skin. Moreau forces the village to hand over Douglas only to peacefully take him to the House to discuss the situation. Douglas, Montgomery and Moreau gather and he introduces his hybrid "children" and later dine. Then, he explains his creations: he fused animals with human genes in search of a higher being, incapable of harm. The existing Beast Folk are imperfect, but Moreau claims to be "closer than [Douglas] could possibly imagine" in his quest. Moreau's "son" Azazello (Temuera Morrison) comes in with the rabbit, to the disgust of Moreau, who abhors killing. When he learns of the eaten rabbit, he promises that there will be a trial the next day. Douglas tries to escape by boat, but finds it overrun with rat-like creatures and gives up... The film was met with negative reviews. The film grossed only $49 million worldwide on a $40 million budget, which, with marketing and other expenses, lost money for the studio. In an article written upon Brando's death in 2004, critic Roger Ebert described The Island of Dr. Moreau as "perhaps [Brando's] worst film". The Island of Dr. Moreau later received six nominations for the Razzie Awards including Worst Picture and Worst Director, winning Worst Supporting Actor for Marlon Brando (Val Kilmer was also a nominee in this category). At the 1996 Stinkers Bad Movie Awards, Brando was nominated for Worst On-Screen Hairstyle (which he lost to Stephen Baldwin for Bio-Dome) and won Worst Supporting Actor. The film also got nominations for two Saturn Awards: Best Science Fiction Film and Best Make-up. "The Island of Dr. Moreau" is not as bad as it has been pointed out to be, but the film had a bit of a messy production which is however not extremely evident in my opinion. The production was notoriously difficult, marred by issues with the cast, harsh weather, and a skyrocketing budget. Bruce Willis was originally hired to play Edward Douglas, but allegedly dropped out as he started divorce procedures from Demi Moore, his wife at the time. Willis was replaced by Val Kilmer, who made his availability limited, and later had anger issues with most of the cast after also being served divorce papers on set. Then actor Rob Morrow quit because of script rewrites. Also, Marlon Brando's role as Dr. Moreau was supposed to be expanded, but after his daughter, Cheyenne, committed suicide, he retreated to his private island, leaving the film production in limbo, not knowing when or even if he would show up. Brando also didn't want to learn his lines, so he requested them through an earpiece. Finally, original director Richard Stanley was dismissed by New Line Cinema after problems arose during production, with John Frankenheimer being brought in to replace him. The film received generally negative reviews and was considered a box office bomb. H.G Wells story is still for sure horrifying and very very current today. Trivia: In 2014, the documentary Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley's Island of Dr. Moreau was released. It covers Richard Stanley's experiences while he conceived and developed the project, his time as director of the film and the aftermath of his departure and the effect it had on the cast and crew and overall film. Richard Stanley's original screenplay was much darker, sexier and violent. The ending, where the animals take over the island, was far more apocalyptic and downbeat.

    In 2010, United Nations negotiator Edward Douglas (David Thewlis) survives a plane crash in the Java Sea and is eventually rescued by a passing boat. Aboard, a man called Montgomery (Val Kilmer) tends to him. After telling him the boat has no radio, he promises Douglas the captain will take him to Timor after dropping him off. However, when they arrive at Montgomery's destination referred to as "Moreau's Island", he instead advises Douglas to stay with him, ostensibly so he can use the radio on the island. Montgomery unloads a shipment of rabbits at a pen, and one runs away while he slaughters another for Douglas's meal. They then head on to the Main House where Douglas is warned not to wander. There, he meets a daughter of Dr. Moreau's called Aissa (Fairuza Balk), but Montgomery turns him away from her and leads him to his room. On the way, they discuss how Moreau vanished after becoming obsessed with his animal research. Montgomery locks Douglas in his room, but he manages to escape that night. He then comes across the camp's lab where he witnesses the birth of a mutant baby, belonging to and delivered by human-animal hybrids. He is noticed, escapes, and runs into Aissa who leads him to the village of the mutants. On the way, they find the partially eaten corpse of a rabbit, not far from a leopard hybrid called Lo-Mai (Mark Dacascos). At the village, they find the Sayer of the Law (Ron Perlman) whose Law preaches "being human" in terms of restraint and discipline. Dr. Moreau (Marlon Brando), referred to as "The Father" by the mutants, appears. He controls the villagers by using a remote control that causes pain through an implant under the creatures' skin. Moreau forces the village to hand over Douglas only to peacefully take him to the House to discuss the situation. Douglas, Montgomery and Moreau gather and he introduces his hybrid "children" and later dine. Then, he explains his creations: he fused animals with human genes in search of a higher being, incapable of harm. The existing Beast Folk are imperfect, but Moreau claims to be "closer than [Douglas] could possibly imagine" in his quest. Moreau's "son" Azazello (Temuera Morrison) comes in with the rabbit, to the disgust of Moreau, who abhors killing. When he learns of the eaten rabbit, he promises that there will be a trial the next day. Douglas tries to escape by boat, but finds it overrun with rat-like creatures and gives up... The film was met with negative reviews. The film grossed only $49 million worldwide on a $40 million budget, which, with marketing and other expenses, lost money for the studio. In an article written upon Brando's death in 2004, critic Roger Ebert described The Island of Dr. Moreau as "perhaps [Brando's] worst film". The Island of Dr. Moreau later received six nominations for the Razzie Awards including Worst Picture and Worst Director, winning Worst Supporting Actor for Marlon Brando (Val Kilmer was also a nominee in this category). At the 1996 Stinkers Bad Movie Awards, Brando was nominated for Worst On-Screen Hairstyle (which he lost to Stephen Baldwin for Bio-Dome) and won Worst Supporting Actor. The film also got nominations for two Saturn Awards: Best Science Fiction Film and Best Make-up. "The Island of Dr. Moreau" is not as bad as it has been pointed out to be, but the film had a bit of a messy production which is however not extremely evident in my opinion. The production was notoriously difficult, marred by issues with the cast, harsh weather, and a skyrocketing budget. Bruce Willis was originally hired to play Edward Douglas, but allegedly dropped out as he started divorce procedures from Demi Moore, his wife at the time. Willis was replaced by Val Kilmer, who made his availability limited, and later had anger issues with most of the cast after also being served divorce papers on set. Then actor Rob Morrow quit because of script rewrites. Also, Marlon Brando's role as Dr. Moreau was supposed to be expanded, but after his daughter, Cheyenne, committed suicide, he retreated to his private island, leaving the film production in limbo, not knowing when or even if he would show up. Brando also didn't want to learn his lines, so he requested them through an earpiece. Finally, original director Richard Stanley was dismissed by New Line Cinema after problems arose during production, with John Frankenheimer being brought in to replace him. The film received generally negative reviews and was considered a box office bomb. H.G Wells story is still for sure horrifying and very very current today. Trivia: In 2014, the documentary Lost Soul: The Doomed Journey of Richard Stanley's Island of Dr. Moreau was released. It covers Richard Stanley's experiences while he conceived and developed the project, his time as director of the film and the aftermath of his departure and the effect it had on the cast and crew and overall film. Richard Stanley's original screenplay was much darker, sexier and violent. The ending, where the animals take over the island, was far more apocalyptic and downbeat.

  • Jan 07, 2020

    A Career Killing Film!!!

    A Career Killing Film!!!

  • Oct 17, 2019

    An infamously terrible shoot, with cast and crew acting like complete beasts, the final product is less entertaining than the legend of its (un)making. Even so, the material is sound still, and it would be interesting to see this remade with modern effects and an updated setting: Moreau using CRISPR technology to breed new manimal hybrids to survive the effects of climate change, and so on. Cannonical scale: 2/5 (it's more tepid than terrible, while Brando, by far the most inscrutable and diverting part of the movie, arrives too late and leaves too early)

    An infamously terrible shoot, with cast and crew acting like complete beasts, the final product is less entertaining than the legend of its (un)making. Even so, the material is sound still, and it would be interesting to see this remade with modern effects and an updated setting: Moreau using CRISPR technology to breed new manimal hybrids to survive the effects of climate change, and so on. Cannonical scale: 2/5 (it's more tepid than terrible, while Brando, by far the most inscrutable and diverting part of the movie, arrives too late and leaves too early)

  • Sep 25, 2019

    Val Kilmer in one of the strangest movies i have ever seen. Which i like. The ceatures were great for 90s make up. Not the best sci-fi but overall it was creative and deserves a modern remake.

    Val Kilmer in one of the strangest movies i have ever seen. Which i like. The ceatures were great for 90s make up. Not the best sci-fi but overall it was creative and deserves a modern remake.