A Hijacking Reviews

  • Apr 27, 2018

    What crap, Who in the CIA lets a girl shoot him in the back On the air craft, let the killer live tied up with weapons on him Derrrrr

    What crap, Who in the CIA lets a girl shoot him in the back On the air craft, let the killer live tied up with weapons on him Derrrrr

  • Apr 23, 2018

    This would be a great companion piece to watch alongside Greengrass' 'Captain Phillips', whereas that film focused on events on the ship this film is more interested in the back and forth of the negotiations. We spend more time in Danish shiny offices, focused mainly on the CEO perfectly portrayed by Malling. It doesn't always engage you, but when it does it makes for riveting and realistic viewing. Worth seeking out.

    This would be a great companion piece to watch alongside Greengrass' 'Captain Phillips', whereas that film focused on events on the ship this film is more interested in the back and forth of the negotiations. We spend more time in Danish shiny offices, focused mainly on the CEO perfectly portrayed by Malling. It doesn't always engage you, but when it does it makes for riveting and realistic viewing. Worth seeking out.

  • Mar 22, 2018

    A tense thriller which keeps one gripped. I liked the way the story flipped between the ship and the headquarters with no overlap of the story. The psychological impact of being a hostage was well described.

    A tense thriller which keeps one gripped. I liked the way the story flipped between the ship and the headquarters with no overlap of the story. The psychological impact of being a hostage was well described.

  • Jul 16, 2017

    Though plot wise it is similar to Captain Phillips this is way more believable in terms of script and its narrative. Yes it doesn't have any big name actors but the cast are solid, it doesn't succumb to the usual action movie cliches (you don't even see the hijacking take place) and is far more of a character study but it still has its thrills, plenty of tension and it looks great.

    Though plot wise it is similar to Captain Phillips this is way more believable in terms of script and its narrative. Yes it doesn't have any big name actors but the cast are solid, it doesn't succumb to the usual action movie cliches (you don't even see the hijacking take place) and is far more of a character study but it still has its thrills, plenty of tension and it looks great.

  • May 26, 2017

    Boardroom negotiation meets hostage negotiation.

    Boardroom negotiation meets hostage negotiation.

  • Sep 29, 2016

    Lindholm's not in unexplored waters, but his strong direction will hijack your attention.

    Lindholm's not in unexplored waters, but his strong direction will hijack your attention.

  • Jun 07, 2016

    A Hijacking, a Danish pirate hijacking film by Tobias Lindholm which screened in the Orizzonti section of the 2012 Venice Film Festival, will be heavily compared with the Hollywood version Captain Phillips (2013) directed by Paul Greengrass. Lindholm's version follows a more subtle and low-key trajectory which however builds up to full grit with no lesser intensity, if not more. Alternating its drama between a cargo ship MV Rozen that gets hijacked by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean, and the head office of the shipping company where the negotiation on the ransom demanded by the Somalis takes place, the film has two protagonists (unlike Captain Phillips). First the ship's cook Mikkel (Pilou Asbæk) who along with the rest of the seamen endure a lengthy period living in subhuman conditions as they are taken hostage. Then we have the chief executive of the shipping company, Peter Ludvigsen (Søren Malling) who must battle a psychological drama as he negotiates for his crew's freedom at a glacial pace, with the pirate translator, Omar (Abdihakin Asgar). When the ship's captain falls ill, Mikkel finds himself trapped between his attempt to get on the good side with the pirates and at the same time unwillingly becoming their primary negotiating tool that could end his life. A minimalist mastery, the story slowly but surely grips you at a tidy pace as the situation winches tighter. Lindholm chooses not to even show how the Somalis take over the ship, and focuses on the psychological build-up with the characters being stuck in cramped, confined situations for extended periods. A compelling experience to watch Mikkel and his friends' fragile fate pendulate at the mercy of the mercurial moods of the pirates, and the palpitating drama unfolding in the head office as Ludvigsen painstakingly fights for his men's lives. The cast delivers a moving performance. Both considered worthy films, but I'm definitely a bigger fan of the Danish version compared to Greengrass' Captain Phillips.

    A Hijacking, a Danish pirate hijacking film by Tobias Lindholm which screened in the Orizzonti section of the 2012 Venice Film Festival, will be heavily compared with the Hollywood version Captain Phillips (2013) directed by Paul Greengrass. Lindholm's version follows a more subtle and low-key trajectory which however builds up to full grit with no lesser intensity, if not more. Alternating its drama between a cargo ship MV Rozen that gets hijacked by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean, and the head office of the shipping company where the negotiation on the ransom demanded by the Somalis takes place, the film has two protagonists (unlike Captain Phillips). First the ship's cook Mikkel (Pilou Asbæk) who along with the rest of the seamen endure a lengthy period living in subhuman conditions as they are taken hostage. Then we have the chief executive of the shipping company, Peter Ludvigsen (Søren Malling) who must battle a psychological drama as he negotiates for his crew's freedom at a glacial pace, with the pirate translator, Omar (Abdihakin Asgar). When the ship's captain falls ill, Mikkel finds himself trapped between his attempt to get on the good side with the pirates and at the same time unwillingly becoming their primary negotiating tool that could end his life. A minimalist mastery, the story slowly but surely grips you at a tidy pace as the situation winches tighter. Lindholm chooses not to even show how the Somalis take over the ship, and focuses on the psychological build-up with the characters being stuck in cramped, confined situations for extended periods. A compelling experience to watch Mikkel and his friends' fragile fate pendulate at the mercy of the mercurial moods of the pirates, and the palpitating drama unfolding in the head office as Ludvigsen painstakingly fights for his men's lives. The cast delivers a moving performance. Both considered worthy films, but I'm definitely a bigger fan of the Danish version compared to Greengrass' Captain Phillips.

  • Feb 09, 2016

    Raw and Real. Loved it. The only downside was the frustration of those damn negotiations. A real McEnroe racket smasher.

    Raw and Real. Loved it. The only downside was the frustration of those damn negotiations. A real McEnroe racket smasher.

  • Dec 03, 2015

    Staying clear of black-and-white reasoning opting to keep a human honesty A Hijacking creates a great atmosphere in spite of its shoddy camera work, but as the movie is largely straightforward and without many twist or surprises the film drags on to the point that suspense and attention will be lost.

    Staying clear of black-and-white reasoning opting to keep a human honesty A Hijacking creates a great atmosphere in spite of its shoddy camera work, but as the movie is largely straightforward and without many twist or surprises the film drags on to the point that suspense and attention will be lost.

  • Nov 28, 2015

    Danish drama which is tense & absorbing. A must-see.

    Danish drama which is tense & absorbing. A must-see.