A Room With a View Reviews

  • Jun 16, 2019

    Maybe in my old age I'm not quite amenable to English gentility as I once was when young, but man, these folks just get on my nerves with their pretentious English ways. Yes, very Merchant & Ivory and perhaps even sticking true to EM Forster's original story, but it grates. Good ending, but thats about the only thing that saves it, and Daniel Day Lewis's great performance as the even more annoying suitor.

    Maybe in my old age I'm not quite amenable to English gentility as I once was when young, but man, these folks just get on my nerves with their pretentious English ways. Yes, very Merchant & Ivory and perhaps even sticking true to EM Forster's original story, but it grates. Good ending, but thats about the only thing that saves it, and Daniel Day Lewis's great performance as the even more annoying suitor.

  • Jun 05, 2019

    Ivory checks another book from his library, he loved reading it and we watching it. A Room With A View Ivory is setting the mood with nature in the background. One of the most acclaimed adaptation artist of this show business- along with, of course, Aaron Sorkin. Although both of them, has quite an opposite view on how to narrate. Sorkin dashes across the finale leaving the audience whiplashed, while Ivory believes in savouring the dish rather than gulping it down- the director, James Ivory, had had a golden era in his days where he worked aplenty with a long time production partner Ismail Merchant. Almost as if both were on a mission to adapt some of the best literary work and project it on screen with bright colors and juicy texture. But what comes out surprising to me, is how quirky this film is. Usually, the humor that they follow is either flirty or situational. But in here, with Maggie Smith as a reliable capital, the laugh come in easy, ranging from chuckles to a broad smile plastered in the last act of the film where her nature steers the film into a vital bridge. The intertitle was a smart move by Ivory. The storyline jumps a lot during the film, and highlighting the event somehow helps link all the material in one category. Helena Bonham Carter, in the lead, is a sight to behold, playing tennis and feeling like that very ball, her precarious behavior on both sides of the court, gives away the result beautifully and without any referee. Aforementioned, supporting her or should I say demotivating her, is Smith in her firm voice that loses the grasp of it, as the film ages. Personally, the intervention of Carter by Smith in her hotel room defines the film for me, Smith negates everything Carter leans towards, barrs her in unconvincing views of hers and even manages to close the window or block A Room With A View.

    Ivory checks another book from his library, he loved reading it and we watching it. A Room With A View Ivory is setting the mood with nature in the background. One of the most acclaimed adaptation artist of this show business- along with, of course, Aaron Sorkin. Although both of them, has quite an opposite view on how to narrate. Sorkin dashes across the finale leaving the audience whiplashed, while Ivory believes in savouring the dish rather than gulping it down- the director, James Ivory, had had a golden era in his days where he worked aplenty with a long time production partner Ismail Merchant. Almost as if both were on a mission to adapt some of the best literary work and project it on screen with bright colors and juicy texture. But what comes out surprising to me, is how quirky this film is. Usually, the humor that they follow is either flirty or situational. But in here, with Maggie Smith as a reliable capital, the laugh come in easy, ranging from chuckles to a broad smile plastered in the last act of the film where her nature steers the film into a vital bridge. The intertitle was a smart move by Ivory. The storyline jumps a lot during the film, and highlighting the event somehow helps link all the material in one category. Helena Bonham Carter, in the lead, is a sight to behold, playing tennis and feeling like that very ball, her precarious behavior on both sides of the court, gives away the result beautifully and without any referee. Aforementioned, supporting her or should I say demotivating her, is Smith in her firm voice that loses the grasp of it, as the film ages. Personally, the intervention of Carter by Smith in her hotel room defines the film for me, Smith negates everything Carter leans towards, barrs her in unconvincing views of hers and even manages to close the window or block A Room With A View.

  • Sep 14, 2018

    A movie that NEVER gets old. It is simply well made, beautifully directed and well acted. One of the bests of Helena!

    A movie that NEVER gets old. It is simply well made, beautifully directed and well acted. One of the bests of Helena!

  • May 16, 2018

    Like many of these type of films, in the EM Forster style, this is painfully British and a bit of a ruthless caricature, but Helena Banham Carter is well cast and so is Maggie Smith and Denholm Elliott. Daniel Day-Lewis frankly disappears into his role as Cecil - not his best work by a long shot but still classic DDL. On the plus side, it’s not too long. On the minus, it’s still slow and not always clear what the characters motivations are.

    Like many of these type of films, in the EM Forster style, this is painfully British and a bit of a ruthless caricature, but Helena Banham Carter is well cast and so is Maggie Smith and Denholm Elliott. Daniel Day-Lewis frankly disappears into his role as Cecil - not his best work by a long shot but still classic DDL. On the plus side, it’s not too long. On the minus, it’s still slow and not always clear what the characters motivations are.

  • Feb 06, 2018

    Renowned for launching the Merchant-Ivory brand of cinematic productions. Magnificent scenery and settings serve as backdrop for the E.M. Forster story about a young woman trying to surpass the limits her Edwardian age society imposes on her. This film was all the rage upon its initial release. While it's effect on audiences may have dulled over the years due to the film's slow pace, there is always Helena Bonham Carter's radiant performance to admire. Cool and complicated, she creates a sophisticated character study of a woman born slightly before her time in the role that deservedly defined her career. Daniel Day Lewis and Julian Sands complete the interesting love triangle that serves as the template for events. Those wanting action and adventure will likely be disappointed, but those with an open mind to travel to a unique place and time may be pleasantly surprised.

    Renowned for launching the Merchant-Ivory brand of cinematic productions. Magnificent scenery and settings serve as backdrop for the E.M. Forster story about a young woman trying to surpass the limits her Edwardian age society imposes on her. This film was all the rage upon its initial release. While it's effect on audiences may have dulled over the years due to the film's slow pace, there is always Helena Bonham Carter's radiant performance to admire. Cool and complicated, she creates a sophisticated character study of a woman born slightly before her time in the role that deservedly defined her career. Daniel Day Lewis and Julian Sands complete the interesting love triangle that serves as the template for events. Those wanting action and adventure will likely be disappointed, but those with an open mind to travel to a unique place and time may be pleasantly surprised.

  • Oct 28, 2017

    A Room with A View Asks You to View Yourself Differently A Room with a View is one of those movies that you walk away from, knowing that your life will never be the same again. This film isn't loudly much of anything. The humor is subtle, the cinematography of the 1980's is no Avatar, and it doesn't overtly comment on the big political issues of our day. No, the power of A Room with a View is more subtle than that, and it is easy to see how its charms can be lost on some. Some might view this film and pass it off as another romantic comedy, but those people would be wrong. A Room with a View isn't a romance. There is no doubt that it has a romance; In many ways it is similar to 500 Days of Summer or La La Land: There is a boy and a girl, and some romance plays out, but the romance is not the entire point of the film. However, if one seeks for more meat than mere flashy entertainment, you will find it here. Our heroine is Lucy Honeychurch, a young English girl who is transfigured by Italy. The part of Lucy Honeychurch is played by a young Helena Bonham Carter, and she is utterly sublime. Helena has a versatility that allows her to switch between quiet and energetic almost effortlessly, which resonates with a wide audience. Few of us are entirely extroverted or introverted, and it is validating to see someone who can do both. This quality fits the role of Lucy Honeychurch entirely because Lucy doesn't know what she is. Throughout the film she is discovering who she is and what she feels, and though mostly reserved, there are moments when the audience can catch glimpses of Lucy's buried passion. The story, set at the turn of the 19th century, begins with Lucy Honeychurch and her older chaperone, Charlotte Bartlett, throwing open the windows of their hotel in Florence and remarking that they don't have a view as they requested. (It is notable to add that the film passes the Bechdel test in this very first conversation.) Some other travelers in Florence, George Emerson and his father (Julian Sands and Denholm Elliott), overhear what has happened and they decide to trade rooms so the ladies can have their view. Though her chaperone is scandalized at first, eventually Lucy convinces her to let them switch rooms with the gentlemen. It's in these simple moments that we get to see the real Lucy and how she has to struggle against what is proper and appropriate in the eyes of others. One day, Lucy is playing the piano in the parlor of their Florentine hotel. She prefers to play the music of Beethoven, which is dramatic and passionate. This is fascinating to her acquaintance, Mr. Beebe, who watches this quiet and unopinionated girl delve so whole-heartedly into the drama. Mr. Beebe remarks "If Ms. Honeychurch ever takes to live as she plays it will be very exciting, both for us and for her." Mr. Beebe is convinced that Lucy is deeply passionate at her core, but that she has hidden her passion underneath convention and the wishes of everyone else. However, all of that is about to change. One day, Lucy wanders alone through the streets of Florence and into a square where she witnesses an Italian man being stabbed. She faints and is caught by George Emerson who happened to be in the square at the opportune moment, carrying her to safety. She comes to and they walk together for a bit, looking out over the river that runs through Florence. As they talk, Lucy is all small talk and politeness, but George Emerson isn't having it. "Something tremendous has happened" he says. "Something's happened to me, and to you." Not long after, a group of tourists decides to go see the Italian countryside one day. Once there, they split up into different parties and George Emerson wanders away from the other men who sit down to have some tea. George, however, finds a tree, climbs to the top and begins to shout his creed: "Beauty! Trust! Joy! Truth! Love!" The other gentlemen think George is simply odd and while they can her him shouting, The Reverend Mr. Eager remarks "One more lump of sugar if I might trouble you, Mr. Beebe." Moments later, Lucy stumbles across George standing alone in a field. He notices her and, without saying a word, walks right up to her and kisses her. Lucy Honeychurch seems to represent each of us. She embodies the part of us that other people approve of; The part that is nice, agreeable, doesn't talk too loud or have too many opinions. George Emerson, on the other hand, seems to represent the part of us that wants to be free. The part that wants to shake off the chains of convention and run a bit wild. The question one must ask when viewing this film is: Which do I choose? A Room with a View invites us to throw off our hampering concerns and live as we have always wanted. It shows us that we can either live like George Emerson, passionately climbing trees and kissing the object of our affection in fields. Or we can live like Mr. Eager: more concerned with putting lumps of sugar in our tea than with living a passionate life, filled with "Love! Joy! And Beauty!" I loved A Room with a View because when it was over, I was a different person than who I was when it began. It stirred something within me and I walked away, wishing to be a better person. Great movies, like great art, are not meant to merely entertain, but to make you feel something; By that estimation, A Room with a View is among the greatest of art.

    A Room with A View Asks You to View Yourself Differently A Room with a View is one of those movies that you walk away from, knowing that your life will never be the same again. This film isn't loudly much of anything. The humor is subtle, the cinematography of the 1980's is no Avatar, and it doesn't overtly comment on the big political issues of our day. No, the power of A Room with a View is more subtle than that, and it is easy to see how its charms can be lost on some. Some might view this film and pass it off as another romantic comedy, but those people would be wrong. A Room with a View isn't a romance. There is no doubt that it has a romance; In many ways it is similar to 500 Days of Summer or La La Land: There is a boy and a girl, and some romance plays out, but the romance is not the entire point of the film. However, if one seeks for more meat than mere flashy entertainment, you will find it here. Our heroine is Lucy Honeychurch, a young English girl who is transfigured by Italy. The part of Lucy Honeychurch is played by a young Helena Bonham Carter, and she is utterly sublime. Helena has a versatility that allows her to switch between quiet and energetic almost effortlessly, which resonates with a wide audience. Few of us are entirely extroverted or introverted, and it is validating to see someone who can do both. This quality fits the role of Lucy Honeychurch entirely because Lucy doesn't know what she is. Throughout the film she is discovering who she is and what she feels, and though mostly reserved, there are moments when the audience can catch glimpses of Lucy's buried passion. The story, set at the turn of the 19th century, begins with Lucy Honeychurch and her older chaperone, Charlotte Bartlett, throwing open the windows of their hotel in Florence and remarking that they don't have a view as they requested. (It is notable to add that the film passes the Bechdel test in this very first conversation.) Some other travelers in Florence, George Emerson and his father (Julian Sands and Denholm Elliott), overhear what has happened and they decide to trade rooms so the ladies can have their view. Though her chaperone is scandalized at first, eventually Lucy convinces her to let them switch rooms with the gentlemen. It's in these simple moments that we get to see the real Lucy and how she has to struggle against what is proper and appropriate in the eyes of others. One day, Lucy is playing the piano in the parlor of their Florentine hotel. She prefers to play the music of Beethoven, which is dramatic and passionate. This is fascinating to her acquaintance, Mr. Beebe, who watches this quiet and unopinionated girl delve so whole-heartedly into the drama. Mr. Beebe remarks "If Ms. Honeychurch ever takes to live as she plays it will be very exciting, both for us and for her." Mr. Beebe is convinced that Lucy is deeply passionate at her core, but that she has hidden her passion underneath convention and the wishes of everyone else. However, all of that is about to change. One day, Lucy wanders alone through the streets of Florence and into a square where she witnesses an Italian man being stabbed. She faints and is caught by George Emerson who happened to be in the square at the opportune moment, carrying her to safety. She comes to and they walk together for a bit, looking out over the river that runs through Florence. As they talk, Lucy is all small talk and politeness, but George Emerson isn't having it. "Something tremendous has happened" he says. "Something's happened to me, and to you." Not long after, a group of tourists decides to go see the Italian countryside one day. Once there, they split up into different parties and George Emerson wanders away from the other men who sit down to have some tea. George, however, finds a tree, climbs to the top and begins to shout his creed: "Beauty! Trust! Joy! Truth! Love!" The other gentlemen think George is simply odd and while they can her him shouting, The Reverend Mr. Eager remarks "One more lump of sugar if I might trouble you, Mr. Beebe." Moments later, Lucy stumbles across George standing alone in a field. He notices her and, without saying a word, walks right up to her and kisses her. Lucy Honeychurch seems to represent each of us. She embodies the part of us that other people approve of; The part that is nice, agreeable, doesn't talk too loud or have too many opinions. George Emerson, on the other hand, seems to represent the part of us that wants to be free. The part that wants to shake off the chains of convention and run a bit wild. The question one must ask when viewing this film is: Which do I choose? A Room with a View invites us to throw off our hampering concerns and live as we have always wanted. It shows us that we can either live like George Emerson, passionately climbing trees and kissing the object of our affection in fields. Or we can live like Mr. Eager: more concerned with putting lumps of sugar in our tea than with living a passionate life, filled with "Love! Joy! And Beauty!" I loved A Room with a View because when it was over, I was a different person than who I was when it began. It stirred something within me and I walked away, wishing to be a better person. Great movies, like great art, are not meant to merely entertain, but to make you feel something; By that estimation, A Room with a View is among the greatest of art.

  • Oct 24, 2017

    What a wonderful movie! Terrific cast. The acting was good. There were some scenes where it could have been better or the way it was shot could have been better. The locations though we're gorgeous, taking place in both London and Florence. We definitely get to see the beauty that is the English and Italian countryside. I love the era it was set in and the beautiful set pieces and costumes. Helena looks very pretty in this movie, very cute. The storyline was interesting and the dialogue between characters seemed fluid and punctual. Very theatrical play-like, it was very entertaining to watch. Marvelous, just marvelous movie!

    What a wonderful movie! Terrific cast. The acting was good. There were some scenes where it could have been better or the way it was shot could have been better. The locations though we're gorgeous, taking place in both London and Florence. We definitely get to see the beauty that is the English and Italian countryside. I love the era it was set in and the beautiful set pieces and costumes. Helena looks very pretty in this movie, very cute. The storyline was interesting and the dialogue between characters seemed fluid and punctual. Very theatrical play-like, it was very entertaining to watch. Marvelous, just marvelous movie!

  • Aug 28, 2017

    Wonderful costume drama with subtle humour.

    Wonderful costume drama with subtle humour.

  • Jul 22, 2017

    Early 20th century setting has upper-class young English woman chaperoned by her older cousin on a trip to Italy and later falls in love with another Englishman. My interest level in this story was almost non-existent throughout.

    Early 20th century setting has upper-class young English woman chaperoned by her older cousin on a trip to Italy and later falls in love with another Englishman. My interest level in this story was almost non-existent throughout.

  • Jul 07, 2017

    Nothing like a good piece of British period drama from time to time... Based on E.M. Forster's book, Lucy Honeychurch, a young Englishwoman, makes her first visit to Florence, Italy in the early 1900's. There, she meets an eccentric young man named George Emerson. Upon her return to England, Lucy must decide whether to marry her boring fiance, Cecil, or follow her heart to George. Dame Maggie Smith and Helena Bonham Carter deliver excellent performances. Winner of 3 Academy Awards.

    Nothing like a good piece of British period drama from time to time... Based on E.M. Forster's book, Lucy Honeychurch, a young Englishwoman, makes her first visit to Florence, Italy in the early 1900's. There, she meets an eccentric young man named George Emerson. Upon her return to England, Lucy must decide whether to marry her boring fiance, Cecil, or follow her heart to George. Dame Maggie Smith and Helena Bonham Carter deliver excellent performances. Winner of 3 Academy Awards.