A Separation Reviews

  • May 23, 2020

    An absolute masterpiece

    An absolute masterpiece

  • Apr 16, 2020

    دراما إيرانية أمكنت أن تعرض عددا من المعضلات الأخلاقية في حبكة مشوّقة

    دراما إيرانية أمكنت أن تعرض عددا من المعضلات الأخلاقية في حبكة مشوّقة

  • Mar 28, 2020

    This is the kind of film where nothing seems amazing, everything feels so natural and normal, but suddenly you find yourself in a complex and unique journey. A separation is the story of Nader and Simin, a marriage of 14 years that now face the divorce request by the female partner because she wants to get out of the country with the hole family, but her husband would not leave Iran due to his father's serious dementia. They have a pre-adolescent girl who has to deal with this situation, and decide after all which parent she wants to live with. Asghar Farhadi directs, writes and produces this wonderful piece of art set in the mordern-day Iran and that is an important factor due to progress that we have seen in the last years in Islamic countries. As the story goes on we see how modernization in social aspects have arrived to Iran and how the people deals with it, but also how traditional they remain even for legal issues. We do not see this movie as a technical achievement of course, that was not the intention and neither was to make a symbolic complex film that would have different interpretations, as far as we know those are not the reasons why Farhadi made A separation. The whole idea is supported by an outstanding screenplay, every dialogue and every line are so powerful and well written, in particular the discussions of our two main characters and the conflict that involves Nader. The cast is simply the best not only our four starring actors, yes, four, but also the children are superb, we can feel with them, either is sadness or fear they are always believable. And that end, oh my god that end scene it just defines the title that is really important through the whole film because our two main characters always feel separated, distant and where they are together there are no happy moments, everything is a conflict. For me is the movie of the decade, all in it works in a perfect way, I felt delighted from that great first scene to that monumental final shot. It is so refreshing to see something from another culture completely different and feel so attached to it, Cinema is a universal language that make us feel alive and A separation is the living proof for that. 10/10

    This is the kind of film where nothing seems amazing, everything feels so natural and normal, but suddenly you find yourself in a complex and unique journey. A separation is the story of Nader and Simin, a marriage of 14 years that now face the divorce request by the female partner because she wants to get out of the country with the hole family, but her husband would not leave Iran due to his father's serious dementia. They have a pre-adolescent girl who has to deal with this situation, and decide after all which parent she wants to live with. Asghar Farhadi directs, writes and produces this wonderful piece of art set in the mordern-day Iran and that is an important factor due to progress that we have seen in the last years in Islamic countries. As the story goes on we see how modernization in social aspects have arrived to Iran and how the people deals with it, but also how traditional they remain even for legal issues. We do not see this movie as a technical achievement of course, that was not the intention and neither was to make a symbolic complex film that would have different interpretations, as far as we know those are not the reasons why Farhadi made A separation. The whole idea is supported by an outstanding screenplay, every dialogue and every line are so powerful and well written, in particular the discussions of our two main characters and the conflict that involves Nader. The cast is simply the best not only our four starring actors, yes, four, but also the children are superb, we can feel with them, either is sadness or fear they are always believable. And that end, oh my god that end scene it just defines the title that is really important through the whole film because our two main characters always feel separated, distant and where they are together there are no happy moments, everything is a conflict. For me is the movie of the decade, all in it works in a perfect way, I felt delighted from that great first scene to that monumental final shot. It is so refreshing to see something from another culture completely different and feel so attached to it, Cinema is a universal language that make us feel alive and A separation is the living proof for that. 10/10

  • Mar 19, 2020

    Terrific performances deliver an ailing separation case whereas egoism outweighs humanism as the argument proved solid points for and against one another, even though missing some pivotal information to further investigate. Meanwhile, it's adjunct to another plot the case has brought in as some sort of final test to finalize any indication in the morally complex direction. This is all surrounding the perspective of the young victim being most affected when dealing with the stress from the resulted strained hardship to see her parents in truer lights while also splitting her world into two. Sounds messy like any end of long marriage as it gets more complicated between moral and cultural values, but it was all handled very well in an organized fashion. (B+)

    Terrific performances deliver an ailing separation case whereas egoism outweighs humanism as the argument proved solid points for and against one another, even though missing some pivotal information to further investigate. Meanwhile, it's adjunct to another plot the case has brought in as some sort of final test to finalize any indication in the morally complex direction. This is all surrounding the perspective of the young victim being most affected when dealing with the stress from the resulted strained hardship to see her parents in truer lights while also splitting her world into two. Sounds messy like any end of long marriage as it gets more complicated between moral and cultural values, but it was all handled very well in an organized fashion. (B+)

  • Mar 15, 2020

    Intense and bitingly real.

    Intense and bitingly real.

  • Jan 05, 2020

    While this film might seem slow and tedious to get through, I found myself unwilling to turn it off and was emotionally invested in every single character, something I don't find myself doing often. A Separation weaves a mystery that is entirely believable to fit in our world, and that makes it all the more compelling. This is a film that has really stuck with me, and creates empathy that I think many Americans today need to experience.

    While this film might seem slow and tedious to get through, I found myself unwilling to turn it off and was emotionally invested in every single character, something I don't find myself doing often. A Separation weaves a mystery that is entirely believable to fit in our world, and that makes it all the more compelling. This is a film that has really stuck with me, and creates empathy that I think many Americans today need to experience.

  • Dec 01, 2019

    *Spoiler Warning* I'm glad I went into this film without knowing much about the plot as, by the end, I was surprised at how so much more happened than what I thought would transpire from the film upon going into it. The basic outline involves a married couple, Nader and Simin, who wish to get a divorce as Simin wants to leave the country in hopes of finding a better life for their daughter while Nader prefers to stay and look after his father who has Alzheimer's disease. As I was watching it, I started to think that Nader's father would be better off in the hands of someone more qualified. But this was only the first quarter of the film. After this, the film got much darker once the crime angle took full effect. What I loved about it was that the conflict between the two families wasn't black-and-white. It was made clear that you weren't meant to completely agree with one side. Throughout the film, many of the main characters lied to the police and to each other, there were various characters who shifted from being likable to unlikable a handful of times, and there were also some choices made by characters which were inexcusable, regardless of what information was revealed at the end of the film. By the end, you're unsure over how you feel about the various characters, which is reflected well in the ambiguity of the final scene. Overall, I dug this film quite a lot, and I found it to be really effective from start to finish.

    *Spoiler Warning* I'm glad I went into this film without knowing much about the plot as, by the end, I was surprised at how so much more happened than what I thought would transpire from the film upon going into it. The basic outline involves a married couple, Nader and Simin, who wish to get a divorce as Simin wants to leave the country in hopes of finding a better life for their daughter while Nader prefers to stay and look after his father who has Alzheimer's disease. As I was watching it, I started to think that Nader's father would be better off in the hands of someone more qualified. But this was only the first quarter of the film. After this, the film got much darker once the crime angle took full effect. What I loved about it was that the conflict between the two families wasn't black-and-white. It was made clear that you weren't meant to completely agree with one side. Throughout the film, many of the main characters lied to the police and to each other, there were various characters who shifted from being likable to unlikable a handful of times, and there were also some choices made by characters which were inexcusable, regardless of what information was revealed at the end of the film. By the end, you're unsure over how you feel about the various characters, which is reflected well in the ambiguity of the final scene. Overall, I dug this film quite a lot, and I found it to be really effective from start to finish.

  • Nov 12, 2019

    A morally complex, engrossing, and well-acted drama.

    A morally complex, engrossing, and well-acted drama.

  • Oct 09, 2019

    This is one of the best movies i've ever seen.

    This is one of the best movies i've ever seen.

  • Sep 23, 2019

    A Separation is a story that starts simply enough as a domestic drama, but as things escalate it becomes much more. I always find it interesting when a film explores how mundane events can snowball into something serious, and this film shows a great example of the compounding effect one simple decision can create. I was riveted as the plot progressed because they managed to keep enough details from the viewers, so we never quite knew the truth. Eventually the film devolves into a prolonged legal battle, and even though the Iranian legal system is slightly different from our own, it still had all the excitement that I love out of courtroom dramas. In fact, there was some simplicity to this court proceeding that I found delightful. (Perhaps the absence of lawyers helps.) There were twists and turns, bold lies, and emotional pleas to the judge. This all made for a movie that worked much better for me than I expected after the slow setup in the early scenes. What I always find amazing is when a film is able to shift my opinions of the characters over time, without completely rewriting them. The personalities of the characters in A Separation never changed one bit, but each time something more would be revealed, I would reconsider how I felt about the people involved. There are no clear villains or heroes in this story, because it feels like real life. Instead, each character is doing what they think is right, and whether they are actually in the right or in the wrong is in the eye of the beholder. There are several aspects of this movie that are tough to watch, though. It prominently features an old man struggling with Alzheimer’s, which I’ve experienced firsthand and I don’t enjoy reliving it. The ending is also a real gut punch, and sadly left me hanging instead of giving me the closure I typically prefer. However, all-around I think that A Separation is a wonderfully constructed film, and one that more people should seek out.

    A Separation is a story that starts simply enough as a domestic drama, but as things escalate it becomes much more. I always find it interesting when a film explores how mundane events can snowball into something serious, and this film shows a great example of the compounding effect one simple decision can create. I was riveted as the plot progressed because they managed to keep enough details from the viewers, so we never quite knew the truth. Eventually the film devolves into a prolonged legal battle, and even though the Iranian legal system is slightly different from our own, it still had all the excitement that I love out of courtroom dramas. In fact, there was some simplicity to this court proceeding that I found delightful. (Perhaps the absence of lawyers helps.) There were twists and turns, bold lies, and emotional pleas to the judge. This all made for a movie that worked much better for me than I expected after the slow setup in the early scenes. What I always find amazing is when a film is able to shift my opinions of the characters over time, without completely rewriting them. The personalities of the characters in A Separation never changed one bit, but each time something more would be revealed, I would reconsider how I felt about the people involved. There are no clear villains or heroes in this story, because it feels like real life. Instead, each character is doing what they think is right, and whether they are actually in the right or in the wrong is in the eye of the beholder. There are several aspects of this movie that are tough to watch, though. It prominently features an old man struggling with Alzheimer’s, which I’ve experienced firsthand and I don’t enjoy reliving it. The ending is also a real gut punch, and sadly left me hanging instead of giving me the closure I typically prefer. However, all-around I think that A Separation is a wonderfully constructed film, and one that more people should seek out.