Black Girl (La noire de...) Reviews

  • Sep 19, 2020

    Watched this along with a short by the same director about a horse&cart taxi man trying to make a living in Dakar. This was a very sad film - I was surprised at the emotional impact it had on me by the end, as we kind of knew the story going into it. Simply told, sad, oppressive story and mood.

    Watched this along with a short by the same director about a horse&cart taxi man trying to make a living in Dakar. This was a very sad film - I was surprised at the emotional impact it had on me by the end, as we kind of knew the story going into it. Simply told, sad, oppressive story and mood.

  • Apr 18, 2019

    Very thought provoking film with a very deep and intriguing plot. The plot very much echos the viewpoint of colonialism at the time.

    Very thought provoking film with a very deep and intriguing plot. The plot very much echos the viewpoint of colonialism at the time.

  • Mar 10, 2018

    It doesn't completely fulfill its themes and ideas but there's still an interesting and personal story here, especially in an extremely segregated and economically troubling time.

    It doesn't completely fulfill its themes and ideas but there's still an interesting and personal story here, especially in an extremely segregated and economically troubling time.

  • Sep 29, 2017

    Short film by the first african film maker. The film is an exercise based on an article in the newspaper, and tries to explain a suicide. It fails though. There is not enough feeling of abuse or loneliness and even if I imagine it, I do not see a suicide coming out of it. The reality of the real suicided person must have been much somber. The film was made quickly. The DVD has lots of goodies though. I liked better everything else in it. The shorter film, Borom Sarret (to which I would give 4 stars), packs a much better punch and is more realistic while being made years earlier. Ousmane is no doubt a genius but he tends to fight racism with racism. This is causing a lot of grief in africa in many other countries. There are many races of black people... Ousmane has a good eye for beauty and the other film I have seen from him is more advanced (was made recently). I hope to see them all now.

    Short film by the first african film maker. The film is an exercise based on an article in the newspaper, and tries to explain a suicide. It fails though. There is not enough feeling of abuse or loneliness and even if I imagine it, I do not see a suicide coming out of it. The reality of the real suicided person must have been much somber. The film was made quickly. The DVD has lots of goodies though. I liked better everything else in it. The shorter film, Borom Sarret (to which I would give 4 stars), packs a much better punch and is more realistic while being made years earlier. Ousmane is no doubt a genius but he tends to fight racism with racism. This is causing a lot of grief in africa in many other countries. There are many races of black people... Ousmane has a good eye for beauty and the other film I have seen from him is more advanced (was made recently). I hope to see them all now.

  • Jan 03, 2017

    Narrated by the black girl herself, Diouana (Therese N'Bissine Diop) which involves an African woman from somewhat an impoverished consent gets hired to watch a French family's children but was instead hired as a maid, and is being mistreated throughout.

    Narrated by the black girl herself, Diouana (Therese N'Bissine Diop) which involves an African woman from somewhat an impoverished consent gets hired to watch a French family's children but was instead hired as a maid, and is being mistreated throughout.

  • Sep 19, 2016

    7.3/10, my review: http://wp.me/p1eXom-2AA

    7.3/10, my review: http://wp.me/p1eXom-2AA

  • May 04, 2016

    A must-see for anyone seriously interested in film and film making.

    A must-see for anyone seriously interested in film and film making.

  • Jul 26, 2015

    I am not exactly sure what would considered to be "feature length," but this film is a good example of a shorter film - close to 60 minutes. The key to this gem is the idea of tension between social classes/ethnicities when the titular "black girl" doesn't believe such a tension would be created. The protagonist is picked up from Dakar, and she expects to be working as a maid when her client is looking for workers. She tells the audience her internal thoughts with voice over and we know her expectations are to not be treated like a slave. This is a tragic story with a never-ending loop, where the girl refuses to work until she can eat or be paid while her employer refuses to feed her until she works. We feel for Diouana because she is told to do work that is not even part of her duties such as watching the children; she believes that responsibility should be the mother's, and she is right. What is upsetting is that she slashes her own throat so that she will not live without her dignity. This movie was so short there isn't much to say; it is a good tragedy but one I would only like to see once.

    I am not exactly sure what would considered to be "feature length," but this film is a good example of a shorter film - close to 60 minutes. The key to this gem is the idea of tension between social classes/ethnicities when the titular "black girl" doesn't believe such a tension would be created. The protagonist is picked up from Dakar, and she expects to be working as a maid when her client is looking for workers. She tells the audience her internal thoughts with voice over and we know her expectations are to not be treated like a slave. This is a tragic story with a never-ending loop, where the girl refuses to work until she can eat or be paid while her employer refuses to feed her until she works. We feel for Diouana because she is told to do work that is not even part of her duties such as watching the children; she believes that responsibility should be the mother's, and she is right. What is upsetting is that she slashes her own throat so that she will not live without her dignity. This movie was so short there isn't much to say; it is a good tragedy but one I would only like to see once.

  • Mar 18, 2015

    First African film to be made and produced, this film is definitely a solid enterprise from a man who's been trying to tell the story of his people with his films. Black girls show the effects of colonialism on the African population and how deceitful white people can be, thinking they can always fix everything with money. The film is extremely well shot and very rich in it's details, camera angles and stylistic choices. the narration is also different from most mainstream film but all this gives the film a uniqueness that has hugely contributed to its' popularity. Excellent film.

    First African film to be made and produced, this film is definitely a solid enterprise from a man who's been trying to tell the story of his people with his films. Black girls show the effects of colonialism on the African population and how deceitful white people can be, thinking they can always fix everything with money. The film is extremely well shot and very rich in it's details, camera angles and stylistic choices. the narration is also different from most mainstream film but all this gives the film a uniqueness that has hugely contributed to its' popularity. Excellent film.

  • Jul 16, 2014

    I didn't hire you to sleep! A girl from Senegal is hired as a servant in France. She is often mistreated and socially talked down to. She may not be the worst treated servant in Paris, but that doesn't cause her any less cause for concern. She has dreams of something better, but is she destined to always be a servant? "We're not in Africa!" Ousmane Sembene, director of Moolaade, Xala, Camp de Thiaroye, and Mandabi, delivers Black Girl. The storyline is interesting as the main character is worth following. The plot isn't particularly interesting and the dialogue was pretty average. The cast delivers above average performances and includes Robert Fontaine, Mbissine Therese Diop, and Ann-Marie Jelinek. "She wanted to keep me here as her slave." This is a highly regarded historical film that I decided to grab off Netflix. I will say this was okay and slightly above average but it didn't overly keep my attention or get me excited to see how it unfolds. This is a very average I only felt was worth seeing once. "I had to make coffee myself. She's useless!" Grade: B-

    I didn't hire you to sleep! A girl from Senegal is hired as a servant in France. She is often mistreated and socially talked down to. She may not be the worst treated servant in Paris, but that doesn't cause her any less cause for concern. She has dreams of something better, but is she destined to always be a servant? "We're not in Africa!" Ousmane Sembene, director of Moolaade, Xala, Camp de Thiaroye, and Mandabi, delivers Black Girl. The storyline is interesting as the main character is worth following. The plot isn't particularly interesting and the dialogue was pretty average. The cast delivers above average performances and includes Robert Fontaine, Mbissine Therese Diop, and Ann-Marie Jelinek. "She wanted to keep me here as her slave." This is a highly regarded historical film that I decided to grab off Netflix. I will say this was okay and slightly above average but it didn't overly keep my attention or get me excited to see how it unfolds. This is a very average I only felt was worth seeing once. "I had to make coffee myself. She's useless!" Grade: B-