Bicycle Thieves (Ladri di biciclette) Reviews

  • 2d ago

    This is a touching and tender classic about poverty, family, and crime. It asks tough questions about who is a criminal and what does the economic system in which we live have to do with the choices we make as individuals.

    This is a touching and tender classic about poverty, family, and crime. It asks tough questions about who is a criminal and what does the economic system in which we live have to do with the choices we make as individuals.

  • Jul 07, 2019

    This might still be THE MOST DEPRESSING FILM OF ALL TIME. There is no need to watch it unless you want to experience misery yourself. I was subjected to this in Film School with a similar warning. Do yourself a favor and watch anything else.

    This might still be THE MOST DEPRESSING FILM OF ALL TIME. There is no need to watch it unless you want to experience misery yourself. I was subjected to this in Film School with a similar warning. Do yourself a favor and watch anything else.

  • Apr 15, 2019

    A really enjoyable simple film.

    A really enjoyable simple film.

  • Jan 08, 2019

    One of the all time great films.

    One of the all time great films.

  • Jan 02, 2019

    Manifesto del neorealismo diretto dal grandissimo Vittorio De Sica, la pellicola racconta la storia di un padre a cui viene rubata la bicicletta con cui lavora e insieme al figlio andrà per le strade di Roma alla ricerca di ciò che gli consente di sfamare la propria famiglia. Film commovente e che trasmette emozioni fortissime, come ad esempio quando la moglie di Antonio, il protagonista, prende le lenzuola dei letti e le da un pegno per potersi permettere una bicicletta, che oggi viene visto come semplice mezzo di trasporto, mentre un tempo poteva essere fondamentale per il sostentamento di un nucleo familiare. Antonio e il figlio Bruno gireranno per le strade della città incontrando decine e decine di persone e poca solidarietà nei loro confronti, a parte in qualche caso come nel finale. Solidarietà e aiuto invece che si manifesta attraverso il gruppo di persone che difende il vero ladro della bicicletta accusato da Antonio. Bellissima la scena nel locale dove il padre invita Bruno a non preoccuparsi del conto e di mangiare, manifestando un amore nei confronti del figlio enorme, ma allo stesso tempo l'ombra della preoccupazione lo assale sempre di più non trovando la tanto amata bicicletta. Nel finale Antonio decide di rubarne una e proprio qui troviamo uno dei pochissimi gesti di pietà nei confronti dell'uomo, pietà mossa alla vista di Bruno che difende il padre. Roma è l'altra protagonista della pellicola, con le sue strade enormi invase anche dalle biciclette, una città che si sta riprendendo dalla guerra e in cui i cittadini si aiutano tra di loro. De Sica ha portato sullo schermo un film dal valore incommensurabile. Magnifico.

    Manifesto del neorealismo diretto dal grandissimo Vittorio De Sica, la pellicola racconta la storia di un padre a cui viene rubata la bicicletta con cui lavora e insieme al figlio andrà per le strade di Roma alla ricerca di ciò che gli consente di sfamare la propria famiglia. Film commovente e che trasmette emozioni fortissime, come ad esempio quando la moglie di Antonio, il protagonista, prende le lenzuola dei letti e le da un pegno per potersi permettere una bicicletta, che oggi viene visto come semplice mezzo di trasporto, mentre un tempo poteva essere fondamentale per il sostentamento di un nucleo familiare. Antonio e il figlio Bruno gireranno per le strade della città incontrando decine e decine di persone e poca solidarietà nei loro confronti, a parte in qualche caso come nel finale. Solidarietà e aiuto invece che si manifesta attraverso il gruppo di persone che difende il vero ladro della bicicletta accusato da Antonio. Bellissima la scena nel locale dove il padre invita Bruno a non preoccuparsi del conto e di mangiare, manifestando un amore nei confronti del figlio enorme, ma allo stesso tempo l'ombra della preoccupazione lo assale sempre di più non trovando la tanto amata bicicletta. Nel finale Antonio decide di rubarne una e proprio qui troviamo uno dei pochissimi gesti di pietà nei confronti dell'uomo, pietà mossa alla vista di Bruno che difende il padre. Roma è l'altra protagonista della pellicola, con le sue strade enormi invase anche dalle biciclette, una città che si sta riprendendo dalla guerra e in cui i cittadini si aiutano tra di loro. De Sica ha portato sullo schermo un film dal valore incommensurabile. Magnifico.

  • Dec 11, 2018

    Don't do it, Antonio. Don't. Do it.

    Don't do it, Antonio. Don't. Do it.

  • Nov 16, 2018

    one of the best movies I have ever watched

    one of the best movies I have ever watched

  • Nov 10, 2018

    Here is a movie that proves once and for all that you don't need expensive set pieces, extravagant budgets, big-name actors or an excessive runtime in order to touch the heart and speak to the soul. The best word I could use to describe the layout and aesthetic of the film is simplistic. It's filmed in black and white, uses non-professional actors, has no action scenes and was made decades before C.G.I. was even a dream. What the film does is strip everything to the bare bones, exposing the very nature of the human being and all its flaws and weaknesses. On the surface, it's a story about a man who has his bike stolen, and if he can't retrieve it he'll lose the job he so desperately needs to feed his family. But his quest to accomplish this turns out to be an allegory for the uncaring and selfish nature of humanity. His encounters with angry mobs, unscrupulous locals and unsympathetic authorities drive him to the brink of despair. It's a testament to the films legacy that the issues it raises are still just as relevant and important today as they were then, more half a century ago. It's rightly regarded as one of the most important and influential movies ever made, and its final scenes are some of the most emotionally affecting in the history of cinema.

    Here is a movie that proves once and for all that you don't need expensive set pieces, extravagant budgets, big-name actors or an excessive runtime in order to touch the heart and speak to the soul. The best word I could use to describe the layout and aesthetic of the film is simplistic. It's filmed in black and white, uses non-professional actors, has no action scenes and was made decades before C.G.I. was even a dream. What the film does is strip everything to the bare bones, exposing the very nature of the human being and all its flaws and weaknesses. On the surface, it's a story about a man who has his bike stolen, and if he can't retrieve it he'll lose the job he so desperately needs to feed his family. But his quest to accomplish this turns out to be an allegory for the uncaring and selfish nature of humanity. His encounters with angry mobs, unscrupulous locals and unsympathetic authorities drive him to the brink of despair. It's a testament to the films legacy that the issues it raises are still just as relevant and important today as they were then, more half a century ago. It's rightly regarded as one of the most important and influential movies ever made, and its final scenes are some of the most emotionally affecting in the history of cinema.

  • Oct 06, 2018

    Bicycle Thieves is a touching classic that displays the anguish that comes with desperation and forgoes any sentimentality by always investing in earnest emotions.

    Bicycle Thieves is a touching classic that displays the anguish that comes with desperation and forgoes any sentimentality by always investing in earnest emotions.

  • Aug 26, 2018

    There's no movie I've seen ever that is as honest in its emotions as Bicycle Thieves. Its visual storytelling is ahead of its time. It may seem a bit cliché, but this movie is the finest example of "says so much by saying so little". Carlo Montuori's cinematography couldn't have been more expressive, and Lamberto Maggiorani couldn't have embodied his character better. Not to mention the sweet relationship between Antonio Ricci and his son, Bruno, that brought us some of the most heartbreaking and poignant moments in film, while granting other humorous moments that will put smile on your face involuntarily. Thanks in large part to Enzo Staiola's likable performance. A performance that reminded me of Giorgio Cantarini's performance in La Vita è Bella, another Italian film that is influenced by Bicycle Thieves in terms of the father/son relationship. Truth be told, Vittorio De Sica's intimate direction is what took this movie to a higher level. A direction that took advantage of the simplicity of the story in the best possible way. You can't help putting yourself in the protagonist's shoes, and rooting for him, and his cute son, like you haven't done before. It's a direction that made the naivety of the situations you see the characters get through seem so genuine and authentic that you feel you've been a member of this poor and simple society all through your life. Cesare Zavattini's Oscar nominated screenplay should be praised for balancing between the progress of the main plot adding many layers to it, and making it feel more complicated, while fleshing out the characters with no much dialogue. That being said, it's the movie's script that is flawed. there is timing inaccuracy, and plot holes that can be a tad bit infuriating. The music by Alessandro Cicognini played a key role in keeping the tragic tone underneath most of the movie to use it later while reflecting the protagonist's misery. Overall, Ladri Di Biciclette is an honest, simple, and unpretentious portrait of the struggle for life and self-esteem that deserves every bit of recognition it gets. An Italian classic through and through! (9/10)

    There's no movie I've seen ever that is as honest in its emotions as Bicycle Thieves. Its visual storytelling is ahead of its time. It may seem a bit cliché, but this movie is the finest example of "says so much by saying so little". Carlo Montuori's cinematography couldn't have been more expressive, and Lamberto Maggiorani couldn't have embodied his character better. Not to mention the sweet relationship between Antonio Ricci and his son, Bruno, that brought us some of the most heartbreaking and poignant moments in film, while granting other humorous moments that will put smile on your face involuntarily. Thanks in large part to Enzo Staiola's likable performance. A performance that reminded me of Giorgio Cantarini's performance in La Vita è Bella, another Italian film that is influenced by Bicycle Thieves in terms of the father/son relationship. Truth be told, Vittorio De Sica's intimate direction is what took this movie to a higher level. A direction that took advantage of the simplicity of the story in the best possible way. You can't help putting yourself in the protagonist's shoes, and rooting for him, and his cute son, like you haven't done before. It's a direction that made the naivety of the situations you see the characters get through seem so genuine and authentic that you feel you've been a member of this poor and simple society all through your life. Cesare Zavattini's Oscar nominated screenplay should be praised for balancing between the progress of the main plot adding many layers to it, and making it feel more complicated, while fleshing out the characters with no much dialogue. That being said, it's the movie's script that is flawed. there is timing inaccuracy, and plot holes that can be a tad bit infuriating. The music by Alessandro Cicognini played a key role in keeping the tragic tone underneath most of the movie to use it later while reflecting the protagonist's misery. Overall, Ladri Di Biciclette is an honest, simple, and unpretentious portrait of the struggle for life and self-esteem that deserves every bit of recognition it gets. An Italian classic through and through! (9/10)