A Bigger Splash Reviews

  • Jul 21, 2019

    No plot and nonsensical dialogue.

    No plot and nonsensical dialogue.

  • May 31, 2016

    Seemed like it had potential, but it just dragged on and the story line was predictable and expected. Very disappointed, but Ralph had a solid performance despite. Still don't see this. Ever.

    Seemed like it had potential, but it just dragged on and the story line was predictable and expected. Very disappointed, but Ralph had a solid performance despite. Still don't see this. Ever.

  • Jan 23, 2014

    what a strange thing this was to find. verite with surrealist digressions. Hockney is interesting and insightful, unsurprisingly. even amid all the staged silence and introverted posing. definitely worth seeing if interested in the artwork and the beautiful portraits of London and New York in the early 70s. (including interiors and underground night life)

    what a strange thing this was to find. verite with surrealist digressions. Hockney is interesting and insightful, unsurprisingly. even amid all the staged silence and introverted posing. definitely worth seeing if interested in the artwork and the beautiful portraits of London and New York in the early 70s. (including interiors and underground night life)

  • Apr 16, 2011

    There can't be many people who are familiar with the friends and colleagues who surrounded David Hockney in the early '70s when this film was shot. (Perhaps there is a decent bio of the artist.) I chose the film based on a casual interest in Hockney as a well-known gay artist. And it's certainly informative about Hockney's process and it's very strong showing the real-world influences, the people and places, that make their way into his art. And, one more plus, it's very homoerotic. On the downside it tends toward the opaque in terms of what & who it chooses to show at any given time & it's painfully fragmented. It's a goofy movie but I think an honest one.

    There can't be many people who are familiar with the friends and colleagues who surrounded David Hockney in the early '70s when this film was shot. (Perhaps there is a decent bio of the artist.) I chose the film based on a casual interest in Hockney as a well-known gay artist. And it's certainly informative about Hockney's process and it's very strong showing the real-world influences, the people and places, that make their way into his art. And, one more plus, it's very homoerotic. On the downside it tends toward the opaque in terms of what & who it chooses to show at any given time & it's painfully fragmented. It's a goofy movie but I think an honest one.

  • Jul 07, 2009

    Basically a cinematic homage to the painter David Hockney.

    Basically a cinematic homage to the painter David Hockney.

  • May 17, 2009

    I have to admit that I didn't know who David Hockney was until I know there was this movie. Though it's not easy to follow, it's strangely fascinating somehow.

    I have to admit that I didn't know who David Hockney was until I know there was this movie. Though it's not easy to follow, it's strangely fascinating somehow.

  • Oct 29, 2008

    Mi aspettavo qualcosa di più da questo film su David Hockney...

    Mi aspettavo qualcosa di più da questo film su David Hockney...

  • Jul 18, 2006

    [center][img]http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/9274/hockneyxc5.jpg[/img][/center] (DVD) (First Viewing, 1st Hazan film) I reviewed Peter Watkins's exemplary biopic [URL=http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=29715&entryid=297717&view=public]Edvard Munch[/URL] several months ago, and what I now find surprising is that even if [b]A Bigger Splash[/b] didn't consciously influenced by Watkins's film, their technique for getting at the essence of their respective subjects are startlingly similar: both films assemble seemingly superfluous, offhand moments to construct a multilayered and endlessly faceted portrait of painters and their art. While starring David Hockney as himself, the focus is not on the artist the way a documentary would be, rather, it depicts how art organically, almost inevitably grows out of the stuff of life itself. Notorious and banned for years because of its male nudity and unapologetic depiction of homosexuality (including a tender, lingering and amazingly erotic male/male sex scene that still manages not to show a thing—pay attention and take lessons, Ang Lee!), it seems heavily indebted to the style and structure of the Paul Morrissey/Andy Warhol films. Infuriatingly dull and maddeningly amorphous, yet at the same time, strangely, undeniably riveting.

    [center][img]http://img135.imageshack.us/img135/9274/hockneyxc5.jpg[/img][/center] (DVD) (First Viewing, 1st Hazan film) I reviewed Peter Watkins's exemplary biopic [URL=http://www.rottentomatoes.com/vine/journal_view.php?journalid=29715&entryid=297717&view=public]Edvard Munch[/URL] several months ago, and what I now find surprising is that even if [b]A Bigger Splash[/b] didn't consciously influenced by Watkins's film, their technique for getting at the essence of their respective subjects are startlingly similar: both films assemble seemingly superfluous, offhand moments to construct a multilayered and endlessly faceted portrait of painters and their art. While starring David Hockney as himself, the focus is not on the artist the way a documentary would be, rather, it depicts how art organically, almost inevitably grows out of the stuff of life itself. Notorious and banned for years because of its male nudity and unapologetic depiction of homosexuality (including a tender, lingering and amazingly erotic male/male sex scene that still manages not to show a thing—pay attention and take lessons, Ang Lee!), it seems heavily indebted to the style and structure of the Paul Morrissey/Andy Warhol films. Infuriatingly dull and maddeningly amorphous, yet at the same time, strangely, undeniably riveting.