BloodRayne 2: Deliverance

2007

BloodRayne 2: Deliverance (2007)

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The Old West is changed forever when sexy half-human/half-vampire BloodRayne rides into Deliverance for a showdown against Billy the Kid and his army of vampire cowboys. Natassia Malthe stars in this wild chiller. Zack Ward, Brendan Fletcher, Michael Paré, Chris Coppola. Directed by Uwe Boll.

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Critic Reviews for BloodRayne 2: Deliverance

All Critics (5)

It tries to take itself more seriously, which makes it less laughable, but at the same time, a lot less entertaining. [Full review in Spanish]

Dec 4, 2017 | Rating: 1/4 | Full Review…

This film's a minor cinematic crime entirely unworthy of my rhymes.

Apr 2, 2008 | Rating: 0.5/5 | Full Review…

Hard as it is to believe, this is even worse than the original. It's a startling horrendous movie that actually makes me feel nostalgic for the fourth worst film of last year.

Sep 24, 2007 | Rating: 0/4 | Full Review…

The dialogue is pretty bad, and the acting is rough (especially with Zack Ward). However, Natassia Malthe make an even sexier Rayne

Sep 24, 2007 | Rating: 2/5 | Full Review…

The end result is more amateur than auteur.

Sep 3, 2007 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for BloodRayne 2: Deliverance

To only reason to make a sequel to a bad film is to make money. The filmmakers clearly don't care about the quality of the film, thus this is a film that looks cheap with a bad cast, poor script and poor effects. Not to mention that Uwe Boll is in the directors' chair once more to direct this sequel to his 2006 film Bloodrayne. The result is a film that is far worse than the first, and you wonder how this crap could have been made. I mean really, who would give a budget to this train wreck of a film. Boll has made a few decent films, but the bulk of his work is awful. This is a poorly made film, and it's just not interesting without anything good or really interesting to stand out and grab your attention. This where Uwe Boll fails, developing an effective story and create awesome action and thrills to satisfy an audience. Unfortunately, this is a poorly made film, one that has a very cheap feel to it. This is filmmaking at its worst, and it shouldn't be a surprise due to the fact that it's an Uwe Boll film. If you love action packed horror films, there are far better films out there. Bloodrayne: Deliverance simply just looks too poorly made to be an effective viewing experience. Don't expect anything with film as it is a truly awful film not worth sitting through. Uwe Boll can't clearly adapt a video game to the screen, and this is the proof.

Alex roy
Alex roy

Super Reviewer

½

Another film based on the video game character Bloodrayne. This has nothing to do with the Bloodrayne 2 game what so ever. This time it's set in the old wild west, not that wild though as there isn't a lot of action. Billy the Kid just happens to be a vampire in a small town so Bloodrayne has to come to the rescue. It's not as bad as I feared for an even lower budget sequel to the first, at least that had actors you have heard of in it. Just has that cheap TV film feel to it, but it could have been worse I guess.

Dean King
Dean King

Super Reviewer

Natassia Malthe looks so sexy as the title role in this movie like Kristanna Loken from the original. This action/western/horror film seems average as well as I can see lots of mistake in the scenes what worst Germany director Uwe Boll made.

Dean McKenna
Dean McKenna

Super Reviewer

½

[CENTER][img]http://img293.imageshack.us/img293/7515/2000547521321234233rsay7.jpg[/img][/CENTER] [COLOR=DarkRed][FONT=Arial]It's been some time since infamously derided director Uwe Boll reared his head and much has changed. 2006's [I]Bloodrayne[/I] was his last theatrically released movie but that movie was originally shot in 2004 and pushed back. In the meantime Germany revised its tax code closing the loophole that helped finance many of Boll's cinematic duds thanks to German financiers being able to write off their debts. Boll has finished an additional three movies that are all scheduled for release this year, including the star-studded (for Boll) [I]Lord of the Rings[/I] rip-off, [I]In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale[/I] opening this month. Boll may never get a chance to direct a theatrically released film again, which may explain his decision to helm a direct-to-DVD sequel to [I]Bloodrayne[/I]. The dusty town of Deliverance, Montana is under assault from the monstrous Billy the Kid (Zack Ward). Except Billy is no ordinary bandit but a powerful vampire intent on keeping his dastardly deeds nice and quiet until the railroad moves in with a nonstop supply of fresh meat and future members of the undead. Newspaper reporter Newton Pyles (Christopher Coppola, no relation to the famous family) has ventured to Deliverance in hopes of witnessing and writing exciting tales of the Wild West, and instead he's become the man forced to write the cover-up of Billy's actions. The vampires have kidnapped the town's children with the idea of feasting off them while they wait. The town's only hope is half-human, half-vampire Rayne (Natassia Malthe). Under the guidance of rustler Pat Garret (Michael Paré), the pair gather a team to combat Billy the Kid and free Deliverance from evil. Stylistically, [I]Bloodrayne II: Deliverance[/I] is Boll's desperate attempt to ape the look and feel of HBO's popular Western series, [I]Deadwood[/I]. It really is rather obvious to anyone that has ever seen the show. The costumes in Deliverance look similar, the sets are dressed similarly (though they still come across as too tourist attraction stagy), the gas-lamp lighting and use of darkness seems pretty similar, and the screenplay even manages to sprinkle in a few "cocksuckers," which any [I]Deadwood[/I] fan would know was the term of choice for historic cowpokes. Boll has the directing habit of borrowing liberally from his sources, so I expected nothing less for his attempt at a Western. The mundane cinematography goes to great lengths to declare how handheld the camerawork is. There is a noticeable difference between following the action as it develops for a docu-drama feel and simply shaking and bobbing the camera for a misguided attempt at artistic effect. After a while you feel like the cameraman must be balancing on a unicycle. There is an over reliance on particular camera shots and close-ups are strictly reserved for the eyes and fingers during buildups to gunfights. The lavish mountain scenery of Canada (er, I mean Montana, yeah, Montana) is probably the visual highlight of a film that includes a sexy redhead kicking ass in a midriff barring leather bustier. The action is surprisingly decent. The climactic shootout between the forces of good and evil isn't going to rival anything I saw in the updated [I]3:10 to Yuma[/I], however, to Boll's credit, the action is not ineptly constructed. He develops parallel lines of action and separates Rayne's posse to deal with separate heroic last stands. Gunfights are naturally easier to stage than sword battles (shot 1: bad guy fires, shot 2: good guy ducks then fires, shot 3: bad guy gets hit) and that might explain why Rayne doesn't break out her signature arm-blades until the very end of the climax. Rhetorical question time: who brings an arm-blade to a gunfight, anyway? But it is structure that weighs down [I]Bloodrayne II[/I]. Boll finally has a handle on crafting some workable action sequences and he just blows it.[I] Bloodrayne I[/I]I has exactly three action sequences and the first two are rather puny. There is a long drought in between action and in its place are a lot of dull conversations amidst increasingly dull characters. Vampires and the Wild West is a concept that can work; fun can be had with vampire cowboys and high noon (make that midnight) duels, and yet Boll seems uneasy about embracing its supernaturally campy potential. [I]Bloodrayne II[/I] has little blood, zero gore, no nudity, no sex, and a pitifully scant amount of action. In other words, it's missing all of the exploitation elements that make a movie like Bloodrayne II worth watching. Screenwriters Christopher Donaldson and Neil Every throw in a lot of side characters into the stew but then quickly dispatch them as well, which at least keeps the audience on their guard and wary that anyone that assists Rayne is destined for a sudden end. Most egregiously, they speed through one of the best segments in all of movies: the getting-the-team-together sequence. Rayne and Garret are collecting a posse that includes a con man preacher (Michael Eklund) and a drunk affectionately known as Slime Bag Franson (Michael Teigen). Part of the enjoyment of the Western is following the unifying of a team and watching relationships form, and [I]Bloodrayne II [/I]rushes through this process. It collects its gunfighters in brief introductions and then heads right for the finish. There seems to be little continuity between the two films even ignoring the change at lead vampire slaying hottie. The vampires in this entry behave drastically different from the older European ones in the first film. Rayne seems to have lost her healing abilities, which were what the circus folk put on display when she was their money-earning star of their own little freak show (apparently during the 100-plus year gap between films Rayne got a little hammered during Spring Break and got a lower back tattoo). I bring up the healing issue because at one point Rayne is shot several times while escaping via swimming through a river. She's struggling to regain her strength and confesses to Garret about her true nature and her need for blood. In one of the most curious moments for a movie that pairs vampires and cowboys, Garret slices open his arm and holds it over Rayne, dripping blood all over her face. The characters even seem to catch the weirdness as they both remark how much more useful a simple cup might have been. It wouldn't be a Boll movie without an abundance of the bizarre, the ludicrous, and the unintentionally funny. Rayne travels great distances on horseback to Deliverance with the intention of slaying some vampires she knows are responsible for murdering her friends. She finds the reflection-free accomplice ([I]House of the Dead[/I]'s Tyron Leitso) and holds a stool to his windpipe, choking the bastard. Instead of finishing him off Rayne relents and lets him live because, wait for it, he let her participate in his card game. Talk about a strange shift in motivation. During the climax, the townsfolk are stirred to rise up against Billy and his vampire clan thanks to the mayor and Pyles finally growing some spines. They set out to shoot them some vampires, but really what will they accomplish? Bloodrayne II established earlier that the vampires could take being plugged with bullets unless the ammunition is combined with garlic. I doubt the townspeople know they need that key ingredient to their firearms. How do the people in 1880s Montana manage to get a copy of the Chicago newspaper Pyles writes for? The railroad hasn't made its way to Deliverance so I'm at a loss for the speedy spread of print journalism 1,000 miles away. But the most unintentionally funny moment comes at the end when Billy has staged an elaborate system of pulleys so that when Rayne opens a door it drops a weight that will raise a series of noose around the captured children's necks. The kid on the furthest right is hung to death and the children seem to be arranged according to height, which seems a little OCD even for a vampire. The tallest kid on the far left of this makeshift gallows reacts very differently. While the rest of the child actors are crying, fretting, and acting like the ropes are cutting their breathing, this kid on the far left is just standing stone-faced and still. He's not even bothering to act and it shows. The dialogue is expectantly awful, including clunkers like Pyles saying, "I have a question. I came looking for stories of the Wild West," and then never actually asking a question (what kind of reporter doesn't know what a question is?). The best/worst example of dialogue is literally the final line spoken and it blindsides the audience like a car crash. Garret says with a glint of wisdom, "Life is like a penis. When it's hard you get screwed and when it's soft it can't be beat." Wow. Someone alert the motivational poster industry because I have a gut feeling this will rival the perilous "Hang in there" kitty. The first Rayne, Kristanna Loken, decided she'd rather stick with her crummy Sci-Fi TV show, which has since been cancelled, than don the arm-blades once more for Boll. Malthe ([I]Elektra[/I], [I]Skinwalkers[/I]) has the acting prowess you would expect from a former Maxim magazine model. It's not like the role of Rayne involves much motional complexity; mostly an actress has to be able to deliver some clunky dialogue and look attractive while swinging a sword. Malthe is certainly a fine looking woman but she is a non-starter when it comes to the world of acting. Yeah she looks good in leather chaps but whenever she speaks it's in the same emotionless, dry tone even when she's supposed to be angry. She comes across like an ineffectual dominatrix who's studied acting by watching tapes of Shannon Doherty. Malthe seems to have a few faces in her acting repertoire and one of them is stink-eye, which you will be very familiar with by the end of the movie. Ward is hilariously miscast and completely unconvincing as an evil bloodsucker cowboy. Ward got his start in the classic [I]A Christmas Story[/I] and I remember him best playing the goofy, dumb younger brother on comedian Christopher Titus' hysterical TV show, [I]Titus[/I]. Ward tacks on a lousy Eastern European accent that comes in sharp conflict with the setting and material of the film. Are vampires immune from having accents rub off on them, because Rayne seems to have assimilated well into frontier speech patterns? I challenge others not to crack up when he yells, "Now the laughter begins." In his defense, Ward isn't given many scenes to play and the screenwriters have to fall back on the cheap "kids in danger" device to establish his villainy. The other actors don't fare much better. Coppola annoys within minutes of appearing onscreen. A helpful bartender (Chris Spencer) is astoundingly bad even for an Uwe Boll movie. He plays the part like Ted Lange in the Wild West. Boll go-to actor Paré actually seems at home with the Western material and his curt, monotone delivery fits well with the material. He's a good fit for this genre but that doesn't excuse his poor performances in four previous Boll flicks. The best actor in the movie is the original sheriff-turned-vampire (John Novak) who works an impressive snarl and a natural physically intimidating presence. He would have made for a serviceable lead villain over Ward. [I]Bloodrayne II: Deliverance[/I] is far less fun than the original while being better in some regards and worse in others. There isn't much artistic growth shown. Boll was naturally meant to transition to the relegated realm of direct-to-DVD movies. It's more his terrain what with the queasy production values, bad acting, and shoddy, repackaged scripts. In the world of direct-to-DVD a movie can live on into infinity thanks to assembly line sequels. Did anyone realize there are now, thanks to direct-to-DVD releases, seven [I]Children of the Corn[/I]s, four [I]Bring it On[/I]s, and a whopping 13 [I]Land Before Time[/I]s. It's here where Boll's quick production turnarounds will yield the most gain and where he may even thrive. He's already planning to direct a [I]Bloodrayne 3[/I] and producing an [I]Alone in the Dark 2[/I] (regrettably there was a 2005 direct-to-DVD sequel to [I]House of the Dead[/I] though it had no Boll involvement whatsoever). I think Uwe Boll is finally where he belongs. Nate's Grade: D[/FONT][/COLOR]

Nate Zoebl
Nate Zoebl

Super Reviewer

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