Bread and Roses Reviews

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November 30, 2001
July 12, 2001
There's every reason to watch Bread and Roses
June 25, 2001
Presents a slice of life that has hardly made a scratch on American celluloid. With any luck, that scratch will help generate a real itch.
June 22, 2001
Loach treats [the story] as a late-breaking sidebar to a narrative that essentially amounts to a tract on the glories of unskilled trade unionism.
June 22, 2001
Isn't a bad movie, just a painfully obvious one.
June 15, 2001
As didactic as it sometimes gets, its heart is always bigger than its ideology.
June 11, 2001
Loach and screenwriter Paul Laverty draw everything in simplistic, overstated terms.
June 11, 2001
There are many intimate scenes that make the characters of Sam, Rosa and Maya very personal.
June 8, 2001
A tough sell.
June 8, 2001
The problem with Ken Loach's half-Spanish, half-English film isn't the lefty politics, it's that the Brit knows nothing about Los Angeles.
June 7, 2001
A stirring and thought-provoking look at some uncomfortable truths that most Americans ignore.
June 4, 2001
You won't be able to look through cleaning people again as if they were invisible. On that count, it's a godsend.
June 1, 2001
Makes a powerfully persuasive case.
June 1, 2001
If you want social commentary but absorbing entertainment, gritty realism but fictionalized whimsy, something for the head but something for the heart, too, Bread and Roses delivers.
June 1, 2001
Will this movie change anything, or this review make you want to see it? No, probably not. But when you come in tomorrow morning, someone will have emptied your wastebasket.
May 31, 2001
The film is full of pungent and telling observation.
May 31, 2001
It often feels inauthentic, sometimes preachy.
May 30, 2001
Yet in a period of stylistic ostentation, Loach's modest transparency of means is salutary.
May 29, 2001
Preaches to the choir and overreaches its grasp, but it couldn't be timelier.
May 11, 2001
The strength of this vibrant, stirring film is that it doesn't get sidetracked by trying to encompass a love story, and furthermore dares to end on a note that is decidedly bittersweet.
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