The Bridge on the River Kwai Reviews

  • Sep 11, 2020

    "The Bridge on the River Kwai" does a couple things very well that make it a notable film. The movie is technically very well made and is great to look at. Even though I watched a digitally restored version of the movie, I could tell the visuals and aesthetic of the movie are convincing even today. I also thought the movie has a few very impressive performances from the main cast. In addition to these strengths, my favorite aspect of the movie is that it isn't afraid to make the audience truly think about right versus wrong. The movie's moral ambiguity is what really drew me to it. This is an older movie that is definitely paced like one, and can feel pretty long at times. I also have coincidentally seen 3 other films from 1957 at this moment in time that I like a lot more than this one. Nonetheless, this is a movie very focused on its big picture ideas, which I think is pretty commendable.

    "The Bridge on the River Kwai" does a couple things very well that make it a notable film. The movie is technically very well made and is great to look at. Even though I watched a digitally restored version of the movie, I could tell the visuals and aesthetic of the movie are convincing even today. I also thought the movie has a few very impressive performances from the main cast. In addition to these strengths, my favorite aspect of the movie is that it isn't afraid to make the audience truly think about right versus wrong. The movie's moral ambiguity is what really drew me to it. This is an older movie that is definitely paced like one, and can feel pretty long at times. I also have coincidentally seen 3 other films from 1957 at this moment in time that I like a lot more than this one. Nonetheless, this is a movie very focused on its big picture ideas, which I think is pretty commendable.

  • Sep 03, 2020

    This is one of the best war films I've ever seen. This film is excellent. The story in this film was fantastic. For a film that is over 60 years old, it still holds up. My favorite film of the 1950's.

    This is one of the best war films I've ever seen. This film is excellent. The story in this film was fantastic. For a film that is over 60 years old, it still holds up. My favorite film of the 1950's.

  • Aug 10, 2020

    bien hecha y bien actuada, pero es bastante lenta y larga

    bien hecha y bien actuada, pero es bastante lenta y larga

  • Jul 23, 2020

    For The Bridge on the River Kwai, I want to go over the social significance of the railway bridge built. The titular bridge, based on the Burma Railway in Southeast Asia, stands as the movie's and book's symbol for the rise of communism. Saito (Sessue Hayakawa) manipulates American and British soldiers to work and they will die like "coolies" than "heroes," similar to the propaganda used by Communist officials to force the working class to use means of production to structure their socialist revolution. Nicholson (Alec Guinness) rises against the Japanese colonel's totalitarian dictatorship, due to his strict military views, and gets punished and rehabilitated for his resentment. The similar instance happens in another story where a man disagrees with the laws of a socialist leadership and gets jailed for it, George Orwell's 1984. Shears (William Holden) escapes the POW camp and vows to destroy the bridge. Similarly, Americans in the 1950's have a strained relationship with Communism, with the Red and Lavender Scares and the blacklisting of Hollywood actors and screenwriters. In fact, the writers for Bridge were exiled in England and were accused of supporting Communism; therefore, their names were discredited. When Nicholson discovers Shears's plan to blow the railway, he realizes his mistake, gets shot, falls into the plunger, and the bridge explodes. This superb climatic high note showcases the true anarchic effect of communist rule and the British and American rebellion against the proletariat. (4 1⁄2 Hawk Kites out of 5)

    For The Bridge on the River Kwai, I want to go over the social significance of the railway bridge built. The titular bridge, based on the Burma Railway in Southeast Asia, stands as the movie's and book's symbol for the rise of communism. Saito (Sessue Hayakawa) manipulates American and British soldiers to work and they will die like "coolies" than "heroes," similar to the propaganda used by Communist officials to force the working class to use means of production to structure their socialist revolution. Nicholson (Alec Guinness) rises against the Japanese colonel's totalitarian dictatorship, due to his strict military views, and gets punished and rehabilitated for his resentment. The similar instance happens in another story where a man disagrees with the laws of a socialist leadership and gets jailed for it, George Orwell's 1984. Shears (William Holden) escapes the POW camp and vows to destroy the bridge. Similarly, Americans in the 1950's have a strained relationship with Communism, with the Red and Lavender Scares and the blacklisting of Hollywood actors and screenwriters. In fact, the writers for Bridge were exiled in England and were accused of supporting Communism; therefore, their names were discredited. When Nicholson discovers Shears's plan to blow the railway, he realizes his mistake, gets shot, falls into the plunger, and the bridge explodes. This superb climatic high note showcases the true anarchic effect of communist rule and the British and American rebellion against the proletariat. (4 1⁄2 Hawk Kites out of 5)

  • Jul 23, 2020

    A good war movie with great acting, a good story, and great practical effects. The bridge explosion is still amazing. Watch the movie just for that.

    A good war movie with great acting, a good story, and great practical effects. The bridge explosion is still amazing. Watch the movie just for that.

  • Jul 20, 2020

    Some good performances but it really drags.

    Some good performances but it really drags.

  • Jul 16, 2020

    I thought it was ok overall, but, didn't find it terribly engaging rather just showing British arrogance. Also seemed too happy & positive for a WWII movie, almost a comedy which was unrealistic unless they were going for that.

    I thought it was ok overall, but, didn't find it terribly engaging rather just showing British arrogance. Also seemed too happy & positive for a WWII movie, almost a comedy which was unrealistic unless they were going for that.

  • Jul 09, 2020

    Nominated for 8 Oscar awards, The Bridge On The River Kwai would end up winning 7 statues at the 1958 Oscar ceremonies, including the top honor of Best Picture. Other Oscars were awarded for Best Director, Best Lead Actor, Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing, Best Adopted Screenplay and Best Original Music Score. This movie has everything a great motion picture should. From a visual perspective, the cinematography more than deserved the Oscar award. It is visually stunning as it captures both the wild and the beauty of the region (The story takes place in Burma, but was filmed in Sri Lanka). The camera takes full advantage of every vantage point there is to use, from aerial views to underwater and everywhere in between. Composer Malcolm Arnold uses a score that continually builds from beginning to end, but then will disappear completely letting the natural sounds of the jungle and the water take center stage. One particular standout scene where this is employed was when the covert team of commandos slowly, slowly moves up the river in complete silence, pushing a small camouflaged float containing an explosive. The entire film is simply magnificent. Alec Guiness (Best Lead Actor) is fantastic as Col. Nicholson, a British military leader who finds himself and his entire troop being held as Prisoners of War under the Japanese commandant Col. Saito. Saito is portrayed to incompetent perfection by Sessue Hayakawa. Hayakawa was the one Oscar nomination (Best Supporting Male Actor) that did not win… but he was certainly worthy of it. Col. Saito, under the rules of the Geneva Convention, utilizes this camp of POW's as labor to build a railway bridge he is under pressure from his superior to complete. As this is playing out, the British Military has finagled United States military man Major Shears (William Holden) to join them as they attempt to infiltrate this POW area and destroy the bridge being developed. Shears is a reluctant participant, but a necessary one for Britain, because he had escaped from this same POW camp sometime earlier. Like Braveheart, another film I recently watched, this movie contains portrayals of several real-life people, but the story itself is completely manufactured in order to tell a great story… not history. And the story is one that juxtaposes the military commitment and duty of three very different people with their very different moral compasses. In the end, it all turns out to be "Madness! Madness!"

    Nominated for 8 Oscar awards, The Bridge On The River Kwai would end up winning 7 statues at the 1958 Oscar ceremonies, including the top honor of Best Picture. Other Oscars were awarded for Best Director, Best Lead Actor, Best Cinematography, Best Film Editing, Best Adopted Screenplay and Best Original Music Score. This movie has everything a great motion picture should. From a visual perspective, the cinematography more than deserved the Oscar award. It is visually stunning as it captures both the wild and the beauty of the region (The story takes place in Burma, but was filmed in Sri Lanka). The camera takes full advantage of every vantage point there is to use, from aerial views to underwater and everywhere in between. Composer Malcolm Arnold uses a score that continually builds from beginning to end, but then will disappear completely letting the natural sounds of the jungle and the water take center stage. One particular standout scene where this is employed was when the covert team of commandos slowly, slowly moves up the river in complete silence, pushing a small camouflaged float containing an explosive. The entire film is simply magnificent. Alec Guiness (Best Lead Actor) is fantastic as Col. Nicholson, a British military leader who finds himself and his entire troop being held as Prisoners of War under the Japanese commandant Col. Saito. Saito is portrayed to incompetent perfection by Sessue Hayakawa. Hayakawa was the one Oscar nomination (Best Supporting Male Actor) that did not win… but he was certainly worthy of it. Col. Saito, under the rules of the Geneva Convention, utilizes this camp of POW's as labor to build a railway bridge he is under pressure from his superior to complete. As this is playing out, the British Military has finagled United States military man Major Shears (William Holden) to join them as they attempt to infiltrate this POW area and destroy the bridge being developed. Shears is a reluctant participant, but a necessary one for Britain, because he had escaped from this same POW camp sometime earlier. Like Braveheart, another film I recently watched, this movie contains portrayals of several real-life people, but the story itself is completely manufactured in order to tell a great story… not history. And the story is one that juxtaposes the military commitment and duty of three very different people with their very different moral compasses. In the end, it all turns out to be "Madness! Madness!"

  • Jul 07, 2020

    I'll still never understand why so many classic war movies have to be so damn long. It was a chore to get through this one due to the extremely slow pace. Just unnecessary. This stars a young Alec Guinness(aka Obi-Wan Kenobi) and it takes place in Thailand but it's obviously filmed in Sri Lanka. What I take from this is that it was too long and too boring. The bridge blows up at the end and even then it looked like it was done with toys. No more near 3 hour long classic war movies for me, I'm done.

    I'll still never understand why so many classic war movies have to be so damn long. It was a chore to get through this one due to the extremely slow pace. Just unnecessary. This stars a young Alec Guinness(aka Obi-Wan Kenobi) and it takes place in Thailand but it's obviously filmed in Sri Lanka. What I take from this is that it was too long and too boring. The bridge blows up at the end and even then it looked like it was done with toys. No more near 3 hour long classic war movies for me, I'm done.

  • Jul 02, 2020

    Story about soldiers during WWII who help the Japanese build a bridge across a river. It's okay. Not as good as people say. Alec Guiness is awesome. The ending is a bit melodramatic.

    Story about soldiers during WWII who help the Japanese build a bridge across a river. It's okay. Not as good as people say. Alec Guiness is awesome. The ending is a bit melodramatic.