Burnt Reviews

  • Mar 14, 2020

    This is a cult classic, as Rounders is to Poker, Whiplash is to music or Searching for Bobby Fischer is to chess so is Burnt to Fine dining. Cooper gives an intense performance as an arrogant but brilliant egocentric chef fallen from grace forced to adapt to an ever-changing world of French gastronomy. Cooper channeled Marco Pierre White in this film and you can see elements of common stereotypes that high-end cooking entails. Is it realistic? Probably not and I'm sure if this film was viewed by a chef or even a kitchen hand, eyebrows would be raised higher than the salaries given out but I digress, I enjoyed the film immensely. The film's montage of Jones going through the motion of waking up early, checking the produce, seeing his psychiatrist, going to work, etc, seem mundane but when you combine it with the music it really gives off a feeling of Greatness being built from the ground up. I guess this scene is to cooking as what the training montage is to a Rocky film. This film also gives a rare insight into what happens when Greatness fails and everything you've worked towards goes down the drain. We get to see the underlying fabric of rivalries, friendships and basic human connection that underlies every scene. From the rivalry of Reece to the dispassionate analysis of Doctor Rosshilde, Burnt is about the human obsession of perfecting one's craft and about exploring the fragile human connections that are interwoven into our lives. I have watched this film twice because there is enough substance in this film to explore, be motivated by and interesting little tidbits to catch. (For example, Tony's Gold Jaeger-Lecoultre Reverso) However, I find myself coming back to this movie and re-watching certain scenes because I enjoy watching and feeling the human element of pressure, focus, and drive that accompanies most scenes. Burnt is a passionate film that brings everything to the plate, brilliantly executed, and uplifting it left me feeling satisfied.

    This is a cult classic, as Rounders is to Poker, Whiplash is to music or Searching for Bobby Fischer is to chess so is Burnt to Fine dining. Cooper gives an intense performance as an arrogant but brilliant egocentric chef fallen from grace forced to adapt to an ever-changing world of French gastronomy. Cooper channeled Marco Pierre White in this film and you can see elements of common stereotypes that high-end cooking entails. Is it realistic? Probably not and I'm sure if this film was viewed by a chef or even a kitchen hand, eyebrows would be raised higher than the salaries given out but I digress, I enjoyed the film immensely. The film's montage of Jones going through the motion of waking up early, checking the produce, seeing his psychiatrist, going to work, etc, seem mundane but when you combine it with the music it really gives off a feeling of Greatness being built from the ground up. I guess this scene is to cooking as what the training montage is to a Rocky film. This film also gives a rare insight into what happens when Greatness fails and everything you've worked towards goes down the drain. We get to see the underlying fabric of rivalries, friendships and basic human connection that underlies every scene. From the rivalry of Reece to the dispassionate analysis of Doctor Rosshilde, Burnt is about the human obsession of perfecting one's craft and about exploring the fragile human connections that are interwoven into our lives. I have watched this film twice because there is enough substance in this film to explore, be motivated by and interesting little tidbits to catch. (For example, Tony's Gold Jaeger-Lecoultre Reverso) However, I find myself coming back to this movie and re-watching certain scenes because I enjoy watching and feeling the human element of pressure, focus, and drive that accompanies most scenes. Burnt is a passionate film that brings everything to the plate, brilliantly executed, and uplifting it left me feeling satisfied.

  • Feb 16, 2020

    I enjoyed this one and thought that it was interesting to see how intense it can get in kitchens of famous restaurants & Chefs

    I enjoyed this one and thought that it was interesting to see how intense it can get in kitchens of famous restaurants & Chefs

  • Feb 15, 2020

    Let's just start off by saying that judging this movie off the romantic sublot is a void point since it has nothing to do with the actual story. The romance is used more to compliment the story. This movie is a great insight into the world of culinary, and I think it was done well. Yes, the main character was rude and I'm glad they made him that way, it makes the movie stand out from your usual protagonist. It was a good film with diverse characters and a good but predictable ending.

    Let's just start off by saying that judging this movie off the romantic sublot is a void point since it has nothing to do with the actual story. The romance is used more to compliment the story. This movie is a great insight into the world of culinary, and I think it was done well. Yes, the main character was rude and I'm glad they made him that way, it makes the movie stand out from your usual protagonist. It was a good film with diverse characters and a good but predictable ending.

  • Feb 12, 2020

    Very unlikable protagonist. Undelectable dishes regardless if the film is all about cuisine. Towards the end, it just felt like I watched a prideful chef with a big ego fed with ambition who ended up having an even bigger ego.

    Very unlikable protagonist. Undelectable dishes regardless if the film is all about cuisine. Towards the end, it just felt like I watched a prideful chef with a big ego fed with ambition who ended up having an even bigger ego.

  • Jan 13, 2020

    Plot feels aimless and lackluster.

    Plot feels aimless and lackluster.

  • Jan 11, 2020

    Though some flaws, wildly underrated. SYNOPSIS: Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper) is a 2-star Michelin chef who is trying to make a comeback after bringing his Paris restaurant down a few years prior. Now, he has a brand new restaurant in London and is looking to receive his 3rd and final Michelin star. REVIEW SUMMARY: I have to say that I am honestly astonished with how poorly reviewed this film is. In the middle of the movie I looked up the 2016 Oscars expecting this to have been a nomination for Best Picture. It came out in a strong year so I understand why it didn't win, but when my curiosity struck and I checked Rotten Tomatoes... 28%??? Film is subjective, but REALLY? I proceeded to read reviews and I started to understand a little more. This film has a very strong and promising premise, then sprinkled in are a few sub plots that are really misplaced. Jones somehow destroyed the restaurant he prospered in, in Paris and that's only referred to and never explained which I'm completely fine with, but then they keep referring to it. To the point where the major twist (which I loved) is related. Then there's a maestro/love story going on between Cooper and Sienna Miller that I vividly remembered, but really hoped I remembered incorrectly. Then a couple of guys who he apparently owes money to show up a couple of times, Jones's relationship with Reece, which appears to be important, but isn't fleshed out in any way and finally side story of Tony being in love with Jones, which doesn't do anything for the story in the slightest. With all of that being said... what a gorgeously messy film. The acting is amazing, the twist is spectacular and the direction is so beautiful and wonderfully paced. I understand how misdirected the film is, but there is so much good there that I don't understand the extreme hate. I'm thoroughly shocked. 8.3/10. ---------------------------------------BREAKDOWN---------------------------------------- DIRECTION: The direction in this film is beautiful. The shots are so amazing and the color palette is great. Maybe the writing has a few flaws, but the direction of a flawed movie was quite impressive. Especially from someone who doesn't really direct anything or more-so TV shows. He picks the right shots for the right moments that really collect the emotion straight from any of these amazing performances. I haven't seen every rating for every movie that I've seen, but this might be the most underrated film that I've seen. OH, and the seen with the little girl and the cake in the middle of a full dining area! A complete flip of the character, but so pure and grounded. Amazing work. WRITING: Okay. Okay... OKAY. Listen. Look. Listen... I kinda get it. KINDA. Get it. BUT... but... I don't really. The reviews I've seen on this film would make anyone who hasn't seen it, feel like this is possibly one of the worst movies of the decade. Sheesh, maybe ever. It's not even close. The title isn't great and everything I mentioned in my review summary may be true, but this film so VERY entertaining. This film is just a couple tweaks and a harder focus on the main characters journey to his third Michelin star away from being damn near perfect. You can't be that close and land so far. Some spectacular writing was in this film. From "I was almost as good as I thought I was", really giving you a short and sweet self-perception while he also made himself shuck one million oysters for his failure. Then the encounter where tony says, "instead of falling in love with me" which although that subplot was quite pointless, the exchange in that moment was beautiful. There are many flaws in the writing sure, but there are also a lot of gems. ACTING: The acting is superb. Bradley Cooper is riveting as a fictional chef and then amazing supporting roles from Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Omar Sy, Matthew Rhys, Emma Thompson, etc... I mean Lily James being in the movie was completely wiped from my memory. I do want to speak specifically about Matthew Rhys and Daniel Bruhl. They were next-level in this. I mean, Daniel Bruhl's best performance to this day is Inglorious Basterds (every actors best performance was in Inglorious Basterds), but he is so solid in this. I can say the same thing about Matthew Rhys. I just found out he's British, today. I mean what the actual fluff is with these Britishians. I'm going to spend a year in the UK just so I can get a more spot-on American accent cause I'm not even sure anymore. Anyway... he also had an almost interesting wish-it-was-fleshed-out role in this film. Either way, the acting was great in this film and aside from messy subplots, I don't really see much issue with this film. It's too bad I found out about the hate so late. I could've maybe saved this film slaughtering.

    Though some flaws, wildly underrated. SYNOPSIS: Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper) is a 2-star Michelin chef who is trying to make a comeback after bringing his Paris restaurant down a few years prior. Now, he has a brand new restaurant in London and is looking to receive his 3rd and final Michelin star. REVIEW SUMMARY: I have to say that I am honestly astonished with how poorly reviewed this film is. In the middle of the movie I looked up the 2016 Oscars expecting this to have been a nomination for Best Picture. It came out in a strong year so I understand why it didn't win, but when my curiosity struck and I checked Rotten Tomatoes... 28%??? Film is subjective, but REALLY? I proceeded to read reviews and I started to understand a little more. This film has a very strong and promising premise, then sprinkled in are a few sub plots that are really misplaced. Jones somehow destroyed the restaurant he prospered in, in Paris and that's only referred to and never explained which I'm completely fine with, but then they keep referring to it. To the point where the major twist (which I loved) is related. Then there's a maestro/love story going on between Cooper and Sienna Miller that I vividly remembered, but really hoped I remembered incorrectly. Then a couple of guys who he apparently owes money to show up a couple of times, Jones's relationship with Reece, which appears to be important, but isn't fleshed out in any way and finally side story of Tony being in love with Jones, which doesn't do anything for the story in the slightest. With all of that being said... what a gorgeously messy film. The acting is amazing, the twist is spectacular and the direction is so beautiful and wonderfully paced. I understand how misdirected the film is, but there is so much good there that I don't understand the extreme hate. I'm thoroughly shocked. 8.3/10. ---------------------------------------BREAKDOWN---------------------------------------- DIRECTION: The direction in this film is beautiful. The shots are so amazing and the color palette is great. Maybe the writing has a few flaws, but the direction of a flawed movie was quite impressive. Especially from someone who doesn't really direct anything or more-so TV shows. He picks the right shots for the right moments that really collect the emotion straight from any of these amazing performances. I haven't seen every rating for every movie that I've seen, but this might be the most underrated film that I've seen. OH, and the seen with the little girl and the cake in the middle of a full dining area! A complete flip of the character, but so pure and grounded. Amazing work. WRITING: Okay. Okay... OKAY. Listen. Look. Listen... I kinda get it. KINDA. Get it. BUT... but... I don't really. The reviews I've seen on this film would make anyone who hasn't seen it, feel like this is possibly one of the worst movies of the decade. Sheesh, maybe ever. It's not even close. The title isn't great and everything I mentioned in my review summary may be true, but this film so VERY entertaining. This film is just a couple tweaks and a harder focus on the main characters journey to his third Michelin star away from being damn near perfect. You can't be that close and land so far. Some spectacular writing was in this film. From "I was almost as good as I thought I was", really giving you a short and sweet self-perception while he also made himself shuck one million oysters for his failure. Then the encounter where tony says, "instead of falling in love with me" which although that subplot was quite pointless, the exchange in that moment was beautiful. There are many flaws in the writing sure, but there are also a lot of gems. ACTING: The acting is superb. Bradley Cooper is riveting as a fictional chef and then amazing supporting roles from Sienna Miller, Daniel Bruhl, Omar Sy, Matthew Rhys, Emma Thompson, etc... I mean Lily James being in the movie was completely wiped from my memory. I do want to speak specifically about Matthew Rhys and Daniel Bruhl. They were next-level in this. I mean, Daniel Bruhl's best performance to this day is Inglorious Basterds (every actors best performance was in Inglorious Basterds), but he is so solid in this. I can say the same thing about Matthew Rhys. I just found out he's British, today. I mean what the actual fluff is with these Britishians. I'm going to spend a year in the UK just so I can get a more spot-on American accent cause I'm not even sure anymore. Anyway... he also had an almost interesting wish-it-was-fleshed-out role in this film. Either way, the acting was great in this film and aside from messy subplots, I don't really see much issue with this film. It's too bad I found out about the hate so late. I could've maybe saved this film slaughtering.

  • Jan 09, 2020

    Yep, That's what it's like to work w/ a prima donna in the kitchen. Oyster shucker gets a second chance at being a giant @#$%.

    Yep, That's what it's like to work w/ a prima donna in the kitchen. Oyster shucker gets a second chance at being a giant @#$%.

  • Dec 22, 2019

    Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper) was the chef at a high-class Parisian restaurant owned by his mentor Jean-Luc, until his drug use and temperamental behavior destroyed his career and the restaurant. In the aftermath, Adam went into self-imposed exile in New Orleans to sober up, planning to head to London to restart his career and attempt to earn a third Michelin star. In London, Adam searches for old colleagues, beginning with his mentor's former maître d'hôtel, Tony Balerdi (Daniel Brühl), now a hotel manager of The Langham Hotel in London, under the ownership of the Balerdi family. Adam checks into one of The Langham's rooms then visits an old friend, Conti (Henry Goodman) and notes the talent of his sous-chef Helene (Sienna Miller), but she dislikes his arrogance and dismisses him immediately. A Paris colleague, Michel (Omar Sy), whose restaurant Adam had sabotaged out of jealousy tracks him down. After a brief fistfight, they talk and Michel forgives Adam then asks to work for him. Adam also visits a cutting-edge eatery run by Reece (Matthew Rhys), with whom he has a long-standing rivalry, and the visit ends poorly. Adam's former drug dealer realizes he has returned to Europe and attempts to collect Adam's outstanding debt. Adam convinces famed restaurant critic Simone (Uma Thurman) to dine at Tony's hotel. Tony realises that Adam set this up and is reluctant to let him cook, but the condition the kitchen is in, which will result in Simone shutting his restaurant down, he allows Adam to cook, seeing no other way out. Simone's favourable review convinces Tony to renovate the hotel's kitchen and hire Adam as head chef permanently. He stipulates that Adam must submit to weekly drug tests with Tony's psychiatrist Dr. Rosshilde (Emma Thompson). Adam agrees to the tests, although he is disinterested in therapy and throws himself into preparations for the grand opening. Another old friend, Max (Riccardo Scamarcio), joins Adam's team after being released from prison. Helene rebuffs further job offers until her boss, Conti fires her and sends her to Adam's kitchen. Helene is irate about being fired, but Adam convinces her to work for him by tripling her salary. Opening night is a disaster, and Adam furiously closes early, blaming Helene. He publicly humiliates her, escalating from verbal to physical aggression, and she quits... Burnt received negative reviews from critics, who praised Cooper's performance but derided the script and storytelling. Rotten Tomatoes critical consensus reads, "Burnt offers a few spoonfuls of compelling culinary drama, but they're lost in a watery goulash dominated by an unsavory main character and overdone clichés." Justin Chang of Variety praised Cooper's performance but was critical of the script: "Steven Knight's script pours on the acid but holds the depth, forcing its fine actors (including Sienna Miller and Daniel Bruhl) to function less as an ensemble than as a motley sort of intervention group." I am tired of these holier than thou characters that thinks that they are Gods gift to in this case the cuisine. We see enough of them in real life. Bradley Cooper´s character Adam Jones is unsympathetic, selfish, selfdestructive and viole. We have also seen this sort of story way too many times. A character that wants to redeem, but yet not really conform. The story is stereptypical and predictable as well. Besides that you need to understand what passion is and what complete egoism is. This shows the latter in many ways. You can be highly successful even when you are treating other people correct and with respect. Adam Jones does not. However, it´s always intriguing to see the modern cuisine in action so to speak and that part has well made kitchen scenes. And I do like Sienna Miller. But, I have no room for Adam Jones kind of people.

    Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper) was the chef at a high-class Parisian restaurant owned by his mentor Jean-Luc, until his drug use and temperamental behavior destroyed his career and the restaurant. In the aftermath, Adam went into self-imposed exile in New Orleans to sober up, planning to head to London to restart his career and attempt to earn a third Michelin star. In London, Adam searches for old colleagues, beginning with his mentor's former maître d'hôtel, Tony Balerdi (Daniel Brühl), now a hotel manager of The Langham Hotel in London, under the ownership of the Balerdi family. Adam checks into one of The Langham's rooms then visits an old friend, Conti (Henry Goodman) and notes the talent of his sous-chef Helene (Sienna Miller), but she dislikes his arrogance and dismisses him immediately. A Paris colleague, Michel (Omar Sy), whose restaurant Adam had sabotaged out of jealousy tracks him down. After a brief fistfight, they talk and Michel forgives Adam then asks to work for him. Adam also visits a cutting-edge eatery run by Reece (Matthew Rhys), with whom he has a long-standing rivalry, and the visit ends poorly. Adam's former drug dealer realizes he has returned to Europe and attempts to collect Adam's outstanding debt. Adam convinces famed restaurant critic Simone (Uma Thurman) to dine at Tony's hotel. Tony realises that Adam set this up and is reluctant to let him cook, but the condition the kitchen is in, which will result in Simone shutting his restaurant down, he allows Adam to cook, seeing no other way out. Simone's favourable review convinces Tony to renovate the hotel's kitchen and hire Adam as head chef permanently. He stipulates that Adam must submit to weekly drug tests with Tony's psychiatrist Dr. Rosshilde (Emma Thompson). Adam agrees to the tests, although he is disinterested in therapy and throws himself into preparations for the grand opening. Another old friend, Max (Riccardo Scamarcio), joins Adam's team after being released from prison. Helene rebuffs further job offers until her boss, Conti fires her and sends her to Adam's kitchen. Helene is irate about being fired, but Adam convinces her to work for him by tripling her salary. Opening night is a disaster, and Adam furiously closes early, blaming Helene. He publicly humiliates her, escalating from verbal to physical aggression, and she quits... Burnt received negative reviews from critics, who praised Cooper's performance but derided the script and storytelling. Rotten Tomatoes critical consensus reads, "Burnt offers a few spoonfuls of compelling culinary drama, but they're lost in a watery goulash dominated by an unsavory main character and overdone clichés." Justin Chang of Variety praised Cooper's performance but was critical of the script: "Steven Knight's script pours on the acid but holds the depth, forcing its fine actors (including Sienna Miller and Daniel Bruhl) to function less as an ensemble than as a motley sort of intervention group." I am tired of these holier than thou characters that thinks that they are Gods gift to in this case the cuisine. We see enough of them in real life. Bradley Cooper´s character Adam Jones is unsympathetic, selfish, selfdestructive and viole. We have also seen this sort of story way too many times. A character that wants to redeem, but yet not really conform. The story is stereptypical and predictable as well. Besides that you need to understand what passion is and what complete egoism is. This shows the latter in many ways. You can be highly successful even when you are treating other people correct and with respect. Adam Jones does not. However, it´s always intriguing to see the modern cuisine in action so to speak and that part has well made kitchen scenes. And I do like Sienna Miller. But, I have no room for Adam Jones kind of people.

  • Dec 19, 2019

    Absolutely clichéd tripe, served with a side of concentrated cringe and a brush stroke of boke.

    Absolutely clichéd tripe, served with a side of concentrated cringe and a brush stroke of boke.

  • Dec 16, 2019

    Very underrated and and misinterpreted. But an unfortunate title.

    Very underrated and and misinterpreted. But an unfortunate title.