Carmen Jones Reviews

  • Jan 26, 2019

    The best musical romance movie ever made!

    The best musical romance movie ever made!

  • Sep 18, 2018

    Great movie. Historically important. Kudos to Mr. PREMINGER.

    Great movie. Historically important. Kudos to Mr. PREMINGER.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    May 28, 2017

    In this adaptation of the opera, Dorothy Dandridge is a firecracker, and Harry Belafonte is not bad himself. He plays a straight-laced GI who is engaged to a sweet young woman (Olga James), but finds himself seduced by Dandridge when he's charged with taking her in to authorities for fighting on the base. There are some scenes with over-the-top symbolism, such as Dandridge between his legs cleaning his uniform while he munches a peach, and it's pretty steamy stuff for 1954. Gradually we see Belafonte degrade himself, as Dandridge tires of him and moves out to another (a boxer played by Joe Adams). It's hard to feel good about Dandridge's character, but then again it's hard not to be mesmerized by her, and it's great to see a strong woman portrayed. In one scene she's baring her beautiful legs, and in another she's telling Belafonte that she "don't account to no man", and that love "don't give you no right to own me - there's only one that does, and that's me, myself." Hallelujah. It's a strong cast as well, including Pearl Bailey, and I considered a slightly higher rating, but knocked it down because of the voiceovers, which made several of the musical numbers a little less enjoyable for me. While true to the opera and maybe necessary because the music is challenging in places, it often sounded unnatural, which is a shame given Dandridge and Belafonte's singing ability. Still - a very good, entertaining movie.

    In this adaptation of the opera, Dorothy Dandridge is a firecracker, and Harry Belafonte is not bad himself. He plays a straight-laced GI who is engaged to a sweet young woman (Olga James), but finds himself seduced by Dandridge when he's charged with taking her in to authorities for fighting on the base. There are some scenes with over-the-top symbolism, such as Dandridge between his legs cleaning his uniform while he munches a peach, and it's pretty steamy stuff for 1954. Gradually we see Belafonte degrade himself, as Dandridge tires of him and moves out to another (a boxer played by Joe Adams). It's hard to feel good about Dandridge's character, but then again it's hard not to be mesmerized by her, and it's great to see a strong woman portrayed. In one scene she's baring her beautiful legs, and in another she's telling Belafonte that she "don't account to no man", and that love "don't give you no right to own me - there's only one that does, and that's me, myself." Hallelujah. It's a strong cast as well, including Pearl Bailey, and I considered a slightly higher rating, but knocked it down because of the voiceovers, which made several of the musical numbers a little less enjoyable for me. While true to the opera and maybe necessary because the music is challenging in places, it often sounded unnatural, which is a shame given Dandridge and Belafonte's singing ability. Still - a very good, entertaining movie.

  • May 23, 2017

    Otto Preminger's solid adaptation of the Broadway musical (which was originally Bizet's opera) features a luminous performance by Dorothy Dandridge in the title role; she was nominated for an Oscar and is backed up by a fine cast which includes Harry Belafonte, Diahann Carroll and Pearl Bailey. Unfortunately, Oscar Hammerstein's lyrics mar an otherwise flawless production; the voices of Dandridge and Belafonte were dubbed by Marilyn Horne and LeVern Hutcherson.

    Otto Preminger's solid adaptation of the Broadway musical (which was originally Bizet's opera) features a luminous performance by Dorothy Dandridge in the title role; she was nominated for an Oscar and is backed up by a fine cast which includes Harry Belafonte, Diahann Carroll and Pearl Bailey. Unfortunately, Oscar Hammerstein's lyrics mar an otherwise flawless production; the voices of Dandridge and Belafonte were dubbed by Marilyn Horne and LeVern Hutcherson.

  • Sep 04, 2016

    Among the earliest examples of blaxploitation cinema, CARMEN JONES doesn't have an Otto Preminger polish, but it does have hummable songs and good performances.

    Among the earliest examples of blaxploitation cinema, CARMEN JONES doesn't have an Otto Preminger polish, but it does have hummable songs and good performances.

  • May 22, 2016

    Preminger does well translating the Broadway musical (itself an update of the opera Carmen) to film. Belafonte and especially Dorothy Dandridge (nominated for best actress) give good performances.

    Preminger does well translating the Broadway musical (itself an update of the opera Carmen) to film. Belafonte and especially Dorothy Dandridge (nominated for best actress) give good performances.

  • Aug 13, 2015

    Excellent movie & all-star cast

    Excellent movie & all-star cast

  • Jan 29, 2015

    Fun to see Hammerstein's version of Bizet's opera Carmen.

    Fun to see Hammerstein's version of Bizet's opera Carmen.

  • Jun 22, 2014

    ugh this was terrible. I'd never seen the original opera Carmen, and this was based on it. However the characters were so inconsistent and didn't make any logical sense. Painful to watch til the end.

    ugh this was terrible. I'd never seen the original opera Carmen, and this was based on it. However the characters were so inconsistent and didn't make any logical sense. Painful to watch til the end.

  • May 20, 2014

    I love musicals. However, this truly was one of the worst movies I have seen. I felt compelled to watch because it was recommended by a friend. But, the music was horrible, the acting horrible and the plot boring and depressing. Those are the good points.

    I love musicals. However, this truly was one of the worst movies I have seen. I felt compelled to watch because it was recommended by a friend. But, the music was horrible, the acting horrible and the plot boring and depressing. Those are the good points.