Coogan's Bluff Reviews

  • Jan 17, 2019

    Some movies age well. Some don't. Coogan's bluff clearly belongs to the second category. What might have been supposed to be "cool" in 1968 (or should one say "groovy"?) just looks ridiculous today. Even Clint Eastwood - who is busy during the whole thing banging every woman he meets - can't help it.

    Some movies age well. Some don't. Coogan's bluff clearly belongs to the second category. What might have been supposed to be "cool" in 1968 (or should one say "groovy"?) just looks ridiculous today. Even Clint Eastwood - who is busy during the whole thing banging every woman he meets - can't help it.

  • Dec 17, 2018

    Coogan's Bluff ranks as one of my favorite Eastwood films. Partly because of the time period & location which the story takes place. It's an excellent period piece. Late 1960's New York city in all it's Glory. I live in NYC and it's was nice to see the Pan Am Building in the backdrop. It's now the Met Life building. The Pan Am building was also the location of the final scene where the helicopter takes off. The other reason I like this movie is that Eastwood is essentially playing Dirty Harry before Dirty Harry. Coogan is just like Harry Calahan without the 44. magnum. The story is solid but it's the locales and the situations that Coogan finds himself in that sell the movie. Who cares of it's dated? Of course it's dated but that's part of the experience. Actually most movies made more than 20 years ago (or less) are dated. If you look at it in the context of the time it was made then you'll enjoy it. Ignore the negative reviews and check it out.

    Coogan's Bluff ranks as one of my favorite Eastwood films. Partly because of the time period & location which the story takes place. It's an excellent period piece. Late 1960's New York city in all it's Glory. I live in NYC and it's was nice to see the Pan Am Building in the backdrop. It's now the Met Life building. The Pan Am building was also the location of the final scene where the helicopter takes off. The other reason I like this movie is that Eastwood is essentially playing Dirty Harry before Dirty Harry. Coogan is just like Harry Calahan without the 44. magnum. The story is solid but it's the locales and the situations that Coogan finds himself in that sell the movie. Who cares of it's dated? Of course it's dated but that's part of the experience. Actually most movies made more than 20 years ago (or less) are dated. If you look at it in the context of the time it was made then you'll enjoy it. Ignore the negative reviews and check it out.

  • Sep 24, 2018

    Coogan’s Bluff is rooted in a plot device that I tend to enjoy. It’s the story of a police officer from Arizona who comes to the big city to transport a criminal home for trial. It gives the feeling in the opening scenes of the Old West as we see the desert area of Arizona presented like a wild frontier. So when Clint Eastwood’s character came to a modern New York City I expected he was going to bring in his old-fashioned values and tough-as-nails demeanor to clean up the scum of the big city streets and show the cops how it’s done. This is a great storyline that would make him a heroic figure that we could look up to as we are reminded that strong values are timeless and cross all socioeconomic divides. But that’s not what happens in Coogan’s Bluff. Instead Eastwood comes to New York City and is incompetent. He is chastised for standing up for a sexually harassed police officer, he lies in order to get what he wants, and he loses his prisoner after only minutes of taking him into custody. It’s a comedy of failure that is embarrassing and completely undermines the main character. In reality the hero of this film is Lee J. Cobb as the New York police lieutenant. He’s right through the entire movie, and keeps pointing out that Coogan is an idiot who doesn’t deserve a badge. I could not get on board with the protagonist, and I didn’t even mention his womanizing which was one more layer of his unpleasant characterization. I think Coogan’s Bluff fails in almost every way, and left me bored rather than invested in the story.

    Coogan’s Bluff is rooted in a plot device that I tend to enjoy. It’s the story of a police officer from Arizona who comes to the big city to transport a criminal home for trial. It gives the feeling in the opening scenes of the Old West as we see the desert area of Arizona presented like a wild frontier. So when Clint Eastwood’s character came to a modern New York City I expected he was going to bring in his old-fashioned values and tough-as-nails demeanor to clean up the scum of the big city streets and show the cops how it’s done. This is a great storyline that would make him a heroic figure that we could look up to as we are reminded that strong values are timeless and cross all socioeconomic divides. But that’s not what happens in Coogan’s Bluff. Instead Eastwood comes to New York City and is incompetent. He is chastised for standing up for a sexually harassed police officer, he lies in order to get what he wants, and he loses his prisoner after only minutes of taking him into custody. It’s a comedy of failure that is embarrassing and completely undermines the main character. In reality the hero of this film is Lee J. Cobb as the New York police lieutenant. He’s right through the entire movie, and keeps pointing out that Coogan is an idiot who doesn’t deserve a badge. I could not get on board with the protagonist, and I didn’t even mention his womanizing which was one more layer of his unpleasant characterization. I think Coogan’s Bluff fails in almost every way, and left me bored rather than invested in the story.

  • Aug 31, 2018

    Campy, but still action and entertainment from the 60s.

    Campy, but still action and entertainment from the 60s.

  • Jul 25, 2018

    oh yeah this is one of clint eastwood's most badass movies, love the psychedelic 60s scenes

    oh yeah this is one of clint eastwood's most badass movies, love the psychedelic 60s scenes

  • Apr 06, 2018

    ***1/2 Look - if its originality you seek, give 'Coogan's Bluff' a miss. It's predictable, derivative and undoubtedly a product of its time. But it's still pretty entertaining, and Eastwood is his usual ever-likeable screen presence. Nothing special, but there are definitely worse ways to pass the time.

    ***1/2 Look - if its originality you seek, give 'Coogan's Bluff' a miss. It's predictable, derivative and undoubtedly a product of its time. But it's still pretty entertaining, and Eastwood is his usual ever-likeable screen presence. Nothing special, but there are definitely worse ways to pass the time.

  • Feb 14, 2018

    Loved it. Clint Eastwood plays an Arizon sheriff who hunts down a man who takes him all the way to NYC. I just love the way Seigal has Clint play a non nonsense 'just the way life is' macho man. One of my favorites.

    Loved it. Clint Eastwood plays an Arizon sheriff who hunts down a man who takes him all the way to NYC. I just love the way Seigal has Clint play a non nonsense 'just the way life is' macho man. One of my favorites.

  • Sep 22, 2016

    Don Siegel is one of the great Hollywood directors. He tells a good story with economy and no tricks. This fish out of water police drama is like a rehearsal for Siegel and Eastwood's harsher Dirty Harry. Well acted, v enjoyable and wrapped up in ninety minutes.

    Don Siegel is one of the great Hollywood directors. He tells a good story with economy and no tricks. This fish out of water police drama is like a rehearsal for Siegel and Eastwood's harsher Dirty Harry. Well acted, v enjoyable and wrapped up in ninety minutes.

  • May 28, 2016

    Less famous than "Dirty Harry," but a fine portrait of Eastwood as an Arizona lawman adapting to New York City.

    Less famous than "Dirty Harry," but a fine portrait of Eastwood as an Arizona lawman adapting to New York City.

  • May 02, 2016

    Early American Clint Eastwood performances, as he was testing the cinematic waters after his huge success in Leone's highly influential 'The Man with No Name' trilogy of great spaghetti westerns, are such fun to watch, as he experiments and tries out different genres, deciding what direction he wants to take his career. There are such unexpected gems to behold, both acting and directing, like 'Two Mules for Sister Sara', 'Breezy', 'The Beguiled', 'Play Misty for Me', 'Where Eagles Dare' and this, where he plays the proverbial 'fish out of water', in way over his head, as a deputy sheriff from the sticks, having to find an escaped prisoner in the megalopolis of New York City, no less. The great variety of this time is such a cinematic luxury to peruse and discover for oneself. Mine came in the humongous '35 Years 35 Films', and there have been even larger compendiums more recently. They all offer fine value to the discerning cinephile. It's great fun seeing Lee J. Cobb and Susan Clark (when she was really irresistible), and you can never go wrong with director Siegel, who, along with the aforementioned Leone, were the greatest influences on the American icon who at that time was blossoming into his own, the San Franciscan-born Eastwood. Definitely worth owning and rewatching.

    Early American Clint Eastwood performances, as he was testing the cinematic waters after his huge success in Leone's highly influential 'The Man with No Name' trilogy of great spaghetti westerns, are such fun to watch, as he experiments and tries out different genres, deciding what direction he wants to take his career. There are such unexpected gems to behold, both acting and directing, like 'Two Mules for Sister Sara', 'Breezy', 'The Beguiled', 'Play Misty for Me', 'Where Eagles Dare' and this, where he plays the proverbial 'fish out of water', in way over his head, as a deputy sheriff from the sticks, having to find an escaped prisoner in the megalopolis of New York City, no less. The great variety of this time is such a cinematic luxury to peruse and discover for oneself. Mine came in the humongous '35 Years 35 Films', and there have been even larger compendiums more recently. They all offer fine value to the discerning cinephile. It's great fun seeing Lee J. Cobb and Susan Clark (when she was really irresistible), and you can never go wrong with director Siegel, who, along with the aforementioned Leone, were the greatest influences on the American icon who at that time was blossoming into his own, the San Franciscan-born Eastwood. Definitely worth owning and rewatching.