Daughters of Darkness (Les lèvres rouges) Reviews

  • Sep 20, 2019

    Quite an elegant and even, one might say, exquisite movie about vampires. Not so much dealing with gory elements as with psychology, affections and mystery; and it looks quite effective and alluring.

    Quite an elegant and even, one might say, exquisite movie about vampires. Not so much dealing with gory elements as with psychology, affections and mystery; and it looks quite effective and alluring.

  • May 17, 2018

    One of the most stylish horror films ever made, Daughters of Darkness is rescued from the B-movie cheese barrel by Eduard van der Enden's uncommonly sharp cinematography and director Harry Kumel's even more uncommon restraint. More resonant than any movie of its' kind.

    One of the most stylish horror films ever made, Daughters of Darkness is rescued from the B-movie cheese barrel by Eduard van der Enden's uncommonly sharp cinematography and director Harry Kumel's even more uncommon restraint. More resonant than any movie of its' kind.

  • Jun 01, 2016

    For a horror movie in the 60s-70s, this one isn't filmed bad. The costumes and scenery was rich. I can't imagine how much was spent on making it. But, the story line is insane. I got lost too many times. I believe it was due to the drug out dialogue, and the slow film action (or lack of). This is supposed to be a vampire lust story, although I didn't see any fangs. The plot was scattered around, while the characters acted out the same scenes a few times. I believe it was to fill in the lack of script that was originally written. (No spoilers) but, how did the ending happen? It just wasn't possible. lol

    For a horror movie in the 60s-70s, this one isn't filmed bad. The costumes and scenery was rich. I can't imagine how much was spent on making it. But, the story line is insane. I got lost too many times. I believe it was due to the drug out dialogue, and the slow film action (or lack of). This is supposed to be a vampire lust story, although I didn't see any fangs. The plot was scattered around, while the characters acted out the same scenes a few times. I believe it was to fill in the lack of script that was originally written. (No spoilers) but, how did the ending happen? It just wasn't possible. lol

  • Nov 15, 2015

    Better than expected. A newlywed couple are staying in a hotel when a mysterious woman and her assistant arrive at the hotel. Then strange things start happening in the hotel and surrounds... I was expecting some sort of 70s B-grade schlock-horror fest. However, this is better than that and had the potential to be great. For the first 60% or so of the movie, plot and its development are solid, interesting and engaging. There is a degree of character depth too. However, much of this is negated by the final few scenes. After keeping the plot development tight and interesting, the director relaxes control and things get random, silly and a touch pretentious. A pity, as the movie was shaping up for an intriguing ending.

    Better than expected. A newlywed couple are staying in a hotel when a mysterious woman and her assistant arrive at the hotel. Then strange things start happening in the hotel and surrounds... I was expecting some sort of 70s B-grade schlock-horror fest. However, this is better than that and had the potential to be great. For the first 60% or so of the movie, plot and its development are solid, interesting and engaging. There is a degree of character depth too. However, much of this is negated by the final few scenes. After keeping the plot development tight and interesting, the director relaxes control and things get random, silly and a touch pretentious. A pity, as the movie was shaping up for an intriguing ending.

  • Jun 16, 2014

    Impeccably directed, stylish and with a very cool score and a good performance by Delphine Seyrig. It has interesting developments but its also a bit boring sometimes

    Impeccably directed, stylish and with a very cool score and a good performance by Delphine Seyrig. It has interesting developments but its also a bit boring sometimes

  • May 23, 2014

    An arthouse style horror movie featuring two lesbian vampires who visit a seaside town during off-season. The surrealistic visual style and elegant performances make this a very worthwhile watch, which stays faithful to vampire legend, maintaining an element of sinister creepiness throughout it's running time. Recommended to both fans of horror and arthouse audiences.

    An arthouse style horror movie featuring two lesbian vampires who visit a seaside town during off-season. The surrealistic visual style and elegant performances make this a very worthwhile watch, which stays faithful to vampire legend, maintaining an element of sinister creepiness throughout it's running time. Recommended to both fans of horror and arthouse audiences.

  • Mar 04, 2014

    Here we have an excellent example of an imperfect film being elevated chiefly by one GREAT performance, delivered by one of cinema's most justly revered female talents, Delphine Seyrig. Ms Seyrig heads an international cast in this low-budget work of Belgian horror-eroticism. John Karlen (of Dark Shadows fame) and Daniele Ouimet (by then already a veteran of French-Canadian skin flicks) are a pair of mismatched newlyweds traveling on a night train through the Belgian countryside. When their train is stopped by a derailment up ahead, they decide to stay in the small picturesque village of Ostend for a few days. They take a room in a decadent luxury hotel, empty because tourist season has yet to begin. Their solace is interrupted with the arrival of a mysterious aristocratic woman calling herself Countess Elisabeth Bathory (Seyrig), with her 'assistant' Ilona (German model and soft-core queen Andrea Rau). Immediately attracted to the female half of the pair, the elegant and devious Countess sets off a chain of events so that both Karlen and Rau are out of the picture, leaving the way clear for the Countess to seduce and conquer Ouimet. While this isn't nearly as violent or sexually explicit as most films in the so-called 'lesbian vampire' subgenre that thrived in grindhouses and art houses alike in the 60s and 70s, it is definitely the best. As stated before, most of this is because of the beautiful and charismatic Seyrig; director Harry Kümel conceived the film as an homage to the Marlene Dietrich-Josef von Sternberg films of the 1930s. Casting Seyrig as his Dietrich was an ingenious move, and Seyrig proves adept at understanding the exact nature of the film and her role in it. She's aided greatly by the contributions of both Kümel and cinematographer Eduard van der Enden, who present us with a beautiful and sensuous, but empty and forbidding, world of subtly-decayed decadence. The visuals are often brilliant: for example, the Countess's entrance into the film is nothing short of breathtaking. The supporting cast are mostly eclipsed by Seyrig, but Karlen turns in an interesting performance as the brutal, duplicitous husband, who's well in touch with his own sinister kinks and picks up on the Countess's game right away. Ouimet is serviceable as the too-naïve young wife. Rau isn't much of an actress, but she fits in so well with the film's visual world that it's easy to see why she was cast. For a modern audience, there will be few surprises here and even fewer shocks, but this remains a fascinating exercise in cinematic elegance, proving that style sometimes CAN be substance. Thank you, Delphine!!! This cult classic is worthwhile viewing both for fans of Eurohorror and lovers of art cinema. Give it a spin!

    Here we have an excellent example of an imperfect film being elevated chiefly by one GREAT performance, delivered by one of cinema's most justly revered female talents, Delphine Seyrig. Ms Seyrig heads an international cast in this low-budget work of Belgian horror-eroticism. John Karlen (of Dark Shadows fame) and Daniele Ouimet (by then already a veteran of French-Canadian skin flicks) are a pair of mismatched newlyweds traveling on a night train through the Belgian countryside. When their train is stopped by a derailment up ahead, they decide to stay in the small picturesque village of Ostend for a few days. They take a room in a decadent luxury hotel, empty because tourist season has yet to begin. Their solace is interrupted with the arrival of a mysterious aristocratic woman calling herself Countess Elisabeth Bathory (Seyrig), with her 'assistant' Ilona (German model and soft-core queen Andrea Rau). Immediately attracted to the female half of the pair, the elegant and devious Countess sets off a chain of events so that both Karlen and Rau are out of the picture, leaving the way clear for the Countess to seduce and conquer Ouimet. While this isn't nearly as violent or sexually explicit as most films in the so-called 'lesbian vampire' subgenre that thrived in grindhouses and art houses alike in the 60s and 70s, it is definitely the best. As stated before, most of this is because of the beautiful and charismatic Seyrig; director Harry Kümel conceived the film as an homage to the Marlene Dietrich-Josef von Sternberg films of the 1930s. Casting Seyrig as his Dietrich was an ingenious move, and Seyrig proves adept at understanding the exact nature of the film and her role in it. She's aided greatly by the contributions of both Kümel and cinematographer Eduard van der Enden, who present us with a beautiful and sensuous, but empty and forbidding, world of subtly-decayed decadence. The visuals are often brilliant: for example, the Countess's entrance into the film is nothing short of breathtaking. The supporting cast are mostly eclipsed by Seyrig, but Karlen turns in an interesting performance as the brutal, duplicitous husband, who's well in touch with his own sinister kinks and picks up on the Countess's game right away. Ouimet is serviceable as the too-naïve young wife. Rau isn't much of an actress, but she fits in so well with the film's visual world that it's easy to see why she was cast. For a modern audience, there will be few surprises here and even fewer shocks, but this remains a fascinating exercise in cinematic elegance, proving that style sometimes CAN be substance. Thank you, Delphine!!! This cult classic is worthwhile viewing both for fans of Eurohorror and lovers of art cinema. Give it a spin!

  • Feb 26, 2014

    This was a slow paced Vampire movie from Harry Kümel. Had violence and nudity and even though it was slow, it was interesting. Great atmosphere and creepy vibe make for a good vampire flick.

    This was a slow paced Vampire movie from Harry Kümel. Had violence and nudity and even though it was slow, it was interesting. Great atmosphere and creepy vibe make for a good vampire flick.

  • Feb 15, 2014

    The first time I saw this film was at a Euro Horror all-nighter. Unfortunately its slow pace meant I kept dozing off, drifting in an out of consciousness as dawn approached. So it's good now to have watched it again but this time wide awake... Well just about awake, Daughters has a languid dreamlike quality that puts you in a bit of a trance. An elegant, beautifully composed, 'vampire' movie. Delphine Seyrig owns the screen as the sensual Countess Bathory.

    The first time I saw this film was at a Euro Horror all-nighter. Unfortunately its slow pace meant I kept dozing off, drifting in an out of consciousness as dawn approached. So it's good now to have watched it again but this time wide awake... Well just about awake, Daughters has a languid dreamlike quality that puts you in a bit of a trance. An elegant, beautifully composed, 'vampire' movie. Delphine Seyrig owns the screen as the sensual Countess Bathory.

  • Jan 07, 2014

    So slow, you could literally watch this film at double speed and it will still drag. Very 70s and all that gothic being ladled on doesn't actually lead anywhere interesting really.

    So slow, you could literally watch this film at double speed and it will still drag. Very 70s and all that gothic being ladled on doesn't actually lead anywhere interesting really.