Dawn of the Dead Reviews

  • Oct 08, 2019

    Lifeless retread of a classic lacks wit or suspense. Like when some cheesy pop band covers a cherished punk anthem. Director was previously known for making commercials and it shows--quick cuts and superficial action with a veneer of polished visuals to sell you something you don't need. Instead of building tension this rushes from one exploding head to the next until it culminates in a string of highly repetitive propane tank explosions (interspersed with more exploding heads). The gore in Romero's original punctuated the horror whereas here it's the meat of the matter. Some points are telegraphed well in advance (OMG, a pregnant woman--think we'll see a zombie baby?) while other potentially suspenseful sequences seem entirely omitted, as when six survivors in a truck outside are transported to safety inside in the literal blink of an eye jump cut. Senseless action, illogical choices (even for a horror movie), and a bloated cast of characters with little to zero individual identity. Weirdly, the best part of this movie is the opening pre-credits sequence, then inexplicably the resolution is presented in spasms during the closing credits. The whole thing feels rushed. This movie might actually make you dumber by lowering your standards. Stick with the original.

    Lifeless retread of a classic lacks wit or suspense. Like when some cheesy pop band covers a cherished punk anthem. Director was previously known for making commercials and it shows--quick cuts and superficial action with a veneer of polished visuals to sell you something you don't need. Instead of building tension this rushes from one exploding head to the next until it culminates in a string of highly repetitive propane tank explosions (interspersed with more exploding heads). The gore in Romero's original punctuated the horror whereas here it's the meat of the matter. Some points are telegraphed well in advance (OMG, a pregnant woman--think we'll see a zombie baby?) while other potentially suspenseful sequences seem entirely omitted, as when six survivors in a truck outside are transported to safety inside in the literal blink of an eye jump cut. Senseless action, illogical choices (even for a horror movie), and a bloated cast of characters with little to zero individual identity. Weirdly, the best part of this movie is the opening pre-credits sequence, then inexplicably the resolution is presented in spasms during the closing credits. The whole thing feels rushed. This movie might actually make you dumber by lowering your standards. Stick with the original.

  • Sep 25, 2019

    This is one of those rare remakes that does the original justice

    This is one of those rare remakes that does the original justice

  • Sep 23, 2019

    Pretty good remake.

    Pretty good remake.

  • Sep 16, 2019

    Ultimately the greatest remake of a classic zombie movie. An action packed thrill ride of gore, gaffs and guts! Packed with excellent practical effects and a great cast this 2004 remake is by far one of, if not THE greatest modern zombie horrors of all time.

    Ultimately the greatest remake of a classic zombie movie. An action packed thrill ride of gore, gaffs and guts! Packed with excellent practical effects and a great cast this 2004 remake is by far one of, if not THE greatest modern zombie horrors of all time.

  • Sep 07, 2019

    the one thing that I didn't like about this film was the zombie baby, other than that , I thought it was pretty good.

    the one thing that I didn't like about this film was the zombie baby, other than that , I thought it was pretty good.

  • Sep 05, 2019

    This movie has all the zombie tropes, from the rag-tag group holed up in a mall to the zombie hordes mindlessly wandering around or beating down the doors. There are plenty of bone-crunching and flesh-ripping deaths for fans of the genre, delivered with visceral special effects, but nothing can save the dearth of relatable, well-written characters. Zombie movies live and die on the interpersonal drama of the survivors and this movie forgot to make the audience want them to survive at all, with two exceptions that aren't enough to carry the story along. Content warning: gore (obviously), female nudity Closest comparison: It's a flashier, shallower remake of the 1978 classic. Setting: Zombie Plot: Zombie Tone: Zombie

    This movie has all the zombie tropes, from the rag-tag group holed up in a mall to the zombie hordes mindlessly wandering around or beating down the doors. There are plenty of bone-crunching and flesh-ripping deaths for fans of the genre, delivered with visceral special effects, but nothing can save the dearth of relatable, well-written characters. Zombie movies live and die on the interpersonal drama of the survivors and this movie forgot to make the audience want them to survive at all, with two exceptions that aren't enough to carry the story along. Content warning: gore (obviously), female nudity Closest comparison: It's a flashier, shallower remake of the 1978 classic. Setting: Zombie Plot: Zombie Tone: Zombie

  • Jul 24, 2019

    The open scene to this movie has got to go down as one of the best for a horror film.. truly horrific and intense.

    The open scene to this movie has got to go down as one of the best for a horror film.. truly horrific and intense.

  • Jul 23, 2019

    Proof that reboots do NOT suck.

    Proof that reboots do NOT suck.

  • Jul 23, 2019

    I absolutely love it the first time I watched it back when I was in high school. This 2004 reboot manages to create the dreadful feeling & tension of surviving in the zombie apocalypse quite well with its increased ensemble of survivor cast. The film features special appearances from the cast of the original 1978 zombie classic of the same name & the classic quote by George A. Romero, "when there's no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth". (https://youtu.be/VwvHt7Cdswk) Other than that, the post-credit scene is amazing too. All in all, it's a reboot done right by Director Zack Snyder & Writer James Gunn.

    I absolutely love it the first time I watched it back when I was in high school. This 2004 reboot manages to create the dreadful feeling & tension of surviving in the zombie apocalypse quite well with its increased ensemble of survivor cast. The film features special appearances from the cast of the original 1978 zombie classic of the same name & the classic quote by George A. Romero, "when there's no more room in hell, the dead will walk the earth". (https://youtu.be/VwvHt7Cdswk) Other than that, the post-credit scene is amazing too. All in all, it's a reboot done right by Director Zack Snyder & Writer James Gunn.

  • Jul 14, 2019

    Surprisingly good remake of the George A. Romeo zombie apocalypse classic. It's tricky doing a remake of a beloved cult classic, so when I originally went to the theater to watch this film, I went in expecting to hate it, especially since the film was written by the same guy who wrote the terrible live-action Scooby Doo movie, along with some first-time director I'd never heard of and who'd only done music videos and commercials. However, right from the opening moments of the film, with a quiet suburban neighborhood quickly descending into a fight for survival from zombie hoards to when the opening credits roll to Johnny Cash singing "When the Man Comes" around, I was hooked! Little did I know that writer James Gunn would go on to write other terrifically smart and subversive mainstream genre films like "Slither," "Guardians of the Galaxy" as well as the little seen low budget films like "Super" and "The Belko Experiment" and that director Zach Snyder would go on to tackle (more successfully than you'd expect) other sacred cows such as "The Watchmen" and "Man of Steel." Compared to Romero's original, this remake is minus the political subtext Romero infused into all of his zombie films, but it does manage to capture the original film's balance of comedy and horror. Both films are for the most part straight faced horror films, punctuated with moments of levity and black humor. The remake delved less into the audience fantasy aspect of getting to have the run of a shopping mall (similar to "Night of the Comet"), but the humor Gunn placed into his script was arguably much more witty when compared to Romero's more pie-in-the-face style of slapstick comedy. The remake also boasts a strong cast that includes Sarah Polley (a nurse), Ving Rhames (a cop), Mekhi Phifer (an expectant father), Jake Weber (a nice guy), Ty Burrell (a rich jerk), and Michael Kelly (a mall cop). Another charm of the film for fans of the original is that while it does deviate from the original in many ways (running zombie instead of slow zombies, changing most of the characters and scenarios, and keeping really only the basic concept of people holding up in a mall during a zombie apocalypse), the filmmakers included many Easter eggs and nods to the original films, including a truck crashing into a diner (a nod to a story shared by Ben in the original film) or the mall being named after the lead actress in the original film, or cameo appearances by the three stars of the original film (Scott H. Reiniger, Tom Savini, and Ken Foree), and many others. Overall, the world did not need or ask for a "Dawn of the Dead" remake, but Gunn and Synder managed defy my fanboy reservations and won me over to their new vision of Romero's horror classic. Well worth watching for fans of contemporary zombie films as well as for fans of the old school original film.

    Surprisingly good remake of the George A. Romeo zombie apocalypse classic. It's tricky doing a remake of a beloved cult classic, so when I originally went to the theater to watch this film, I went in expecting to hate it, especially since the film was written by the same guy who wrote the terrible live-action Scooby Doo movie, along with some first-time director I'd never heard of and who'd only done music videos and commercials. However, right from the opening moments of the film, with a quiet suburban neighborhood quickly descending into a fight for survival from zombie hoards to when the opening credits roll to Johnny Cash singing "When the Man Comes" around, I was hooked! Little did I know that writer James Gunn would go on to write other terrifically smart and subversive mainstream genre films like "Slither," "Guardians of the Galaxy" as well as the little seen low budget films like "Super" and "The Belko Experiment" and that director Zach Snyder would go on to tackle (more successfully than you'd expect) other sacred cows such as "The Watchmen" and "Man of Steel." Compared to Romero's original, this remake is minus the political subtext Romero infused into all of his zombie films, but it does manage to capture the original film's balance of comedy and horror. Both films are for the most part straight faced horror films, punctuated with moments of levity and black humor. The remake delved less into the audience fantasy aspect of getting to have the run of a shopping mall (similar to "Night of the Comet"), but the humor Gunn placed into his script was arguably much more witty when compared to Romero's more pie-in-the-face style of slapstick comedy. The remake also boasts a strong cast that includes Sarah Polley (a nurse), Ving Rhames (a cop), Mekhi Phifer (an expectant father), Jake Weber (a nice guy), Ty Burrell (a rich jerk), and Michael Kelly (a mall cop). Another charm of the film for fans of the original is that while it does deviate from the original in many ways (running zombie instead of slow zombies, changing most of the characters and scenarios, and keeping really only the basic concept of people holding up in a mall during a zombie apocalypse), the filmmakers included many Easter eggs and nods to the original films, including a truck crashing into a diner (a nod to a story shared by Ben in the original film) or the mall being named after the lead actress in the original film, or cameo appearances by the three stars of the original film (Scott H. Reiniger, Tom Savini, and Ken Foree), and many others. Overall, the world did not need or ask for a "Dawn of the Dead" remake, but Gunn and Synder managed defy my fanboy reservations and won me over to their new vision of Romero's horror classic. Well worth watching for fans of contemporary zombie films as well as for fans of the old school original film.