Everybody's Everything Reviews

  • Feb 23, 2021

    It's a very good peli

    It's a very good peli

  • Dec 27, 2020

    Never heard his music before but after watching this. I live every song. Downloaded all of them. Tragic I heard songs after death. Great soul of a person and bad ass songs. Great documentary

    Never heard his music before but after watching this. I live every song. Downloaded all of them. Tragic I heard songs after death. Great soul of a person and bad ass songs. Great documentary

  • Nov 21, 2020

    I had no idea who the subject was when I watched this so I didn't have much hope to be honest in what to expect. By the end I was really blown away at the story, how it was told, how it was edited and assembled and even felt some sadness for someone I had no idea existed only 90 minutes prior. Even as it all comes to an abrupt end...the story of his life and meteoric rise...it was so hard to even imagine the guy dead. He just seemed so full of life and constantly moving forward and so young. It's not really the way it ended that made this story tragic so much as the fact that it ended. Obviously he had a lot of talent (not a fan of the genre but he clearly knew how to create and promote) and had set lofty goals. From a management standpoint he has the right people around him and they were able to take his talents and turn it into a genuine living. But it's always the clingers on who seem to want to create obstacles for those who are enjoying some level of success that they don't have. And that kind of guilt that Peep carried around is common. It's literally built into the process of transforming from a normal, struggling person to someone who has some success doing something they love. So people in that situation want to share it and experience it with others but those "others" are the ones who will kick the legs out from under you. So it's a tough spot to be in, people need a small, close group of friends they can trust and they need to know when to turn off that side of it and just be a normal person again rather than the successful star. He never got a chance to learn that. But it's also tragic that his business lawyer watched him basically OD right before a show and there were no ultimatums given to get the guy some help. All of the signs were there to those around him, it just feels like they ignored it because, like so many other similar cases, nobody wants to be the person to tell them know when there are so many people making money off of him. If there is a postscript to the documentary it should be that turning human beings into a commodity when there are so many others who are profiting from their pain or their art, that person becomes a walking dollar sign to them and not a friend or client, sadly. The right people were handling him but unfortunately they handled him to their own best ends and not his. Sad. I could have done without the post mortem photos, especially with the mom. The great thing about this documentary is that it crafted such a vivid and explicit image of his life and work, it certainly didn't need to cross the line of good taste and just tuck those photos in there at the end. Kind of cheapened the rest of what I think was brilliantly put together but mindless during that brief moment. If there's one thing artists need to appreciate, it's that some things are sacred and should remain sacred. The National Enquirer used to pay for photos of famous dead people because they were trash and it was trashy to invade that private moment. It's still trashy and will always be trashy. Keep those things sacred. Just because times have changed doesn't mean that bad taste has too. I still highly recommend. That was the only part that felt out of place and more suited for a trashy YouTube video about his life; not a genuine documentary.

    I had no idea who the subject was when I watched this so I didn't have much hope to be honest in what to expect. By the end I was really blown away at the story, how it was told, how it was edited and assembled and even felt some sadness for someone I had no idea existed only 90 minutes prior. Even as it all comes to an abrupt end...the story of his life and meteoric rise...it was so hard to even imagine the guy dead. He just seemed so full of life and constantly moving forward and so young. It's not really the way it ended that made this story tragic so much as the fact that it ended. Obviously he had a lot of talent (not a fan of the genre but he clearly knew how to create and promote) and had set lofty goals. From a management standpoint he has the right people around him and they were able to take his talents and turn it into a genuine living. But it's always the clingers on who seem to want to create obstacles for those who are enjoying some level of success that they don't have. And that kind of guilt that Peep carried around is common. It's literally built into the process of transforming from a normal, struggling person to someone who has some success doing something they love. So people in that situation want to share it and experience it with others but those "others" are the ones who will kick the legs out from under you. So it's a tough spot to be in, people need a small, close group of friends they can trust and they need to know when to turn off that side of it and just be a normal person again rather than the successful star. He never got a chance to learn that. But it's also tragic that his business lawyer watched him basically OD right before a show and there were no ultimatums given to get the guy some help. All of the signs were there to those around him, it just feels like they ignored it because, like so many other similar cases, nobody wants to be the person to tell them know when there are so many people making money off of him. If there is a postscript to the documentary it should be that turning human beings into a commodity when there are so many others who are profiting from their pain or their art, that person becomes a walking dollar sign to them and not a friend or client, sadly. The right people were handling him but unfortunately they handled him to their own best ends and not his. Sad. I could have done without the post mortem photos, especially with the mom. The great thing about this documentary is that it crafted such a vivid and explicit image of his life and work, it certainly didn't need to cross the line of good taste and just tuck those photos in there at the end. Kind of cheapened the rest of what I think was brilliantly put together but mindless during that brief moment. If there's one thing artists need to appreciate, it's that some things are sacred and should remain sacred. The National Enquirer used to pay for photos of famous dead people because they were trash and it was trashy to invade that private moment. It's still trashy and will always be trashy. Keep those things sacred. Just because times have changed doesn't mean that bad taste has too. I still highly recommend. That was the only part that felt out of place and more suited for a trashy YouTube video about his life; not a genuine documentary.

  • Aug 18, 2020

    it is a beautiful documentary brings back memories of a legend who left this earth too soon

    it is a beautiful documentary brings back memories of a legend who left this earth too soon

  • Jun 02, 2020

    Great documentary, dedfinatly worth a watch if you are a peep fan (obviously) or just a music fan in general.

    Great documentary, dedfinatly worth a watch if you are a peep fan (obviously) or just a music fan in general.

  • May 22, 2020

    hasta siempre Lil Peep :')

    hasta siempre Lil Peep :')

  • May 08, 2020

    The Lil Peep Documentary gives a heartbreaking story. Lil Peep is not like any other Lil's. Although his music has the trap feel of heavy 808 bass, tremendous hi-hats, he was beginning to change his sound into interesting sound palettes and writing that is shallow, but was making progress. I loved the documentary, and he was too young and I want to give my respect. His sound and his identity that he left here, is something that I can't explain. Me seeing this documentary and knowing that I have a big heart, this documentary is heartbreaking...and heartwarming.

    The Lil Peep Documentary gives a heartbreaking story. Lil Peep is not like any other Lil's. Although his music has the trap feel of heavy 808 bass, tremendous hi-hats, he was beginning to change his sound into interesting sound palettes and writing that is shallow, but was making progress. I loved the documentary, and he was too young and I want to give my respect. His sound and his identity that he left here, is something that I can't explain. Me seeing this documentary and knowing that I have a big heart, this documentary is heartbreaking...and heartwarming.

  • Mar 23, 2020

    Bellissimo documentario che racconta la vita di questo giovane artista. Spiegato molto bene il legame col nonno tramite le lettere. A mio avviso leggermente confusa la sequenza temporale e avrei gradito qualche intervista e approfondimento in più sugli eventi che ne hanno portato alla morte di Lil Peep.

    Bellissimo documentario che racconta la vita di questo giovane artista. Spiegato molto bene il legame col nonno tramite le lettere. A mio avviso leggermente confusa la sequenza temporale e avrei gradito qualche intervista e approfondimento in più sugli eventi che ne hanno portato alla morte di Lil Peep.

  • Mar 16, 2020

    Interesting documentary of the extraordinary rise and untimely fall of a modern music star.

    Interesting documentary of the extraordinary rise and untimely fall of a modern music star.

  • Mar 05, 2020

    Very eccentric and deeply moving. Although tragic how lil peep passed, he was a pioneer of sorts in his own right in regards to the progressive hip hop movement of today.

    Very eccentric and deeply moving. Although tragic how lil peep passed, he was a pioneer of sorts in his own right in regards to the progressive hip hop movement of today.