Faces Reviews

  • May 07, 2021

    Yet another John Cassavetes movie with all his trademark overindulgences; overacting, needlessly overlong sequences, with cheap camera work, lighting and editing. Those who can stand self-important ‘home-movies' that masquerade as ‘art' to provide work for his drinking pals and family - while rambling on endlessly about precious little - may convince themselves they are having a ‘good time'. Others will do better to find something of value to immerse themselves in. Apologies to fans, but watching these movies amounts to witnessing actor abuse, and this one boasts a total waste of the interesting Lyn Carlin (in her first role)

    Yet another John Cassavetes movie with all his trademark overindulgences; overacting, needlessly overlong sequences, with cheap camera work, lighting and editing. Those who can stand self-important ‘home-movies' that masquerade as ‘art' to provide work for his drinking pals and family - while rambling on endlessly about precious little - may convince themselves they are having a ‘good time'. Others will do better to find something of value to immerse themselves in. Apologies to fans, but watching these movies amounts to witnessing actor abuse, and this one boasts a total waste of the interesting Lyn Carlin (in her first role)

  • Sep 02, 2020

    1001 movies to see before you die. Having just seen three Rowland movies, this one put me over the top. It was depressing.

    1001 movies to see before you die. Having just seen three Rowland movies, this one put me over the top. It was depressing.

  • Jul 22, 2020

    Same themes that Cassavetes will explore characters through, keenly, for years to come.

    Same themes that Cassavetes will explore characters through, keenly, for years to come.

  • Jul 17, 2020

    There is no joy in spending a moment with these characters.

    There is no joy in spending a moment with these characters.

  • May 17, 2020

    another odd classics of the new hollywood school

    another odd classics of the new hollywood school

  • Aug 26, 2019

    Love Streams was my first Cassavetes, and I can say that I liked it so much. Unfortunately, this film is one of the most films I struggled to get through ever. I have no clue what's the point of this film. One thing I knew for sure is that it's filled with close-ups of the face, so I get where its name came from! The performances are phenomenal, though. From John Marley and Gena Rowlands in particular. I also liked how remarkably realistic a couple of the scenes are. Other than that, I was dying of boredom. (3/10)

    Love Streams was my first Cassavetes, and I can say that I liked it so much. Unfortunately, this film is one of the most films I struggled to get through ever. I have no clue what's the point of this film. One thing I knew for sure is that it's filled with close-ups of the face, so I get where its name came from! The performances are phenomenal, though. From John Marley and Gena Rowlands in particular. I also liked how remarkably realistic a couple of the scenes are. Other than that, I was dying of boredom. (3/10)

  • Nov 25, 2017

    Faces is a deeply challenging work, and at a relatively average (at least in today's world) 130 minutes it feels long and hefty at some points. There are many moments at which I wanted to just jump out of my chair and scream at a wall. It's despairing, hopeless, and almost exasperatedly elliptical. At its lightest, it's a hardcore, found-footage horror film that you'll walk out of understanding that life is an immense cluster of drunken balderdash. The strange thing about it is that while it's not exactly a very "fun" movie, it's layered and intelligent; a classic piece of 60's art that understands the science of relationships. Towards the beginning of the film it's actually kind of amusing at how jerky these characters are, but once you begin to relate to what's happening you feel like you need to take a bath (but even then, our character states: "people drown in baths"). As you can probably observe, it doesn't exactly let its viewers off easily, but still somehow provides the audience with intensely moving moments of pure revelation. The film looks and feels for real, as if we're eavesdropping on people's lives, so the intentionally shitty camera-work is justified. The actors work off each other nicely. You may not always sympathize with these people (for some viewers, never), but at the very least one can recognize that the actors who populate this film are pouring in their heart and soul and, by some bittersweet, two- faced miracle, never letting Hollywood sentimentality influence their performance. John Cassavetes, the director, isn't exactly a Bergman-esque dramatist but he is still, at least in my opinion, one of Herzog's "soldiers of cinema." Perhaps we should model ourselves after him, not necessarily as people, but as witnesses to this great movie.

    Faces is a deeply challenging work, and at a relatively average (at least in today's world) 130 minutes it feels long and hefty at some points. There are many moments at which I wanted to just jump out of my chair and scream at a wall. It's despairing, hopeless, and almost exasperatedly elliptical. At its lightest, it's a hardcore, found-footage horror film that you'll walk out of understanding that life is an immense cluster of drunken balderdash. The strange thing about it is that while it's not exactly a very "fun" movie, it's layered and intelligent; a classic piece of 60's art that understands the science of relationships. Towards the beginning of the film it's actually kind of amusing at how jerky these characters are, but once you begin to relate to what's happening you feel like you need to take a bath (but even then, our character states: "people drown in baths"). As you can probably observe, it doesn't exactly let its viewers off easily, but still somehow provides the audience with intensely moving moments of pure revelation. The film looks and feels for real, as if we're eavesdropping on people's lives, so the intentionally shitty camera-work is justified. The actors work off each other nicely. You may not always sympathize with these people (for some viewers, never), but at the very least one can recognize that the actors who populate this film are pouring in their heart and soul and, by some bittersweet, two- faced miracle, never letting Hollywood sentimentality influence their performance. John Cassavetes, the director, isn't exactly a Bergman-esque dramatist but he is still, at least in my opinion, one of Herzog's "soldiers of cinema." Perhaps we should model ourselves after him, not necessarily as people, but as witnesses to this great movie.

  • Jul 07, 2017

    masterpiece where all absolutley unique - camera work, actors play, editing and directing

    masterpiece where all absolutley unique - camera work, actors play, editing and directing

  • Dec 19, 2016

    Classic Cassavetes. Younger film-makers today, take notes. This is ultimately "mumblecore" handed to you on a silver platter!

    Classic Cassavetes. Younger film-makers today, take notes. This is ultimately "mumblecore" handed to you on a silver platter!

  • Aug 26, 2016

    John Cassavetes' Faces is all about disintegration of marriage, friendships and a middle class which has lost its meaning and purpose. Most characters sound cheerful and jubilant, however they are psychologically ruined and behind the gleeful facade they hide a disruptive hidden past. At times Cassavetes explores his characters relentlessly and viciously bringing out moments of great intensity and depth. This is accentuated by the sombre atmosphere and the grainy and documentary quality of the picture. In short Faces is not fun to watch but it's a great work of art which questions its viewers' values, relationships and life purpose.

    John Cassavetes' Faces is all about disintegration of marriage, friendships and a middle class which has lost its meaning and purpose. Most characters sound cheerful and jubilant, however they are psychologically ruined and behind the gleeful facade they hide a disruptive hidden past. At times Cassavetes explores his characters relentlessly and viciously bringing out moments of great intensity and depth. This is accentuated by the sombre atmosphere and the grainy and documentary quality of the picture. In short Faces is not fun to watch but it's a great work of art which questions its viewers' values, relationships and life purpose.