The Good Girl

2002

The Good Girl

Critics Consensus

A dark dramedy with exceptional performances from Jennifer Aniston and Jake Gyllenhaal, The Good Girl is a moving and astute look at the passions of two troubled souls in a small town.

82%

TOMATOMETER

Reviews Counted: 158

59%
liked it

Audience Score

User Ratings: 66,258

TOMATOMETER

N/A
All Critics | Top Critics
Average Rating: N/A
Reviews Count: 0
Fresh: 0
Rotten: 0

AUDIENCE SCORE

59%
Average Rating: 3/5

You may have noticed some of the recent changes we have made. To read more about what we’ve been working on behind the scenes, please check out our new RT Product Blog here.


Want to See

Add Rating
My Rating    

The Good Girl Photos

Movie Info

Justine is thirty years old and works as a discount store clerk in Texas. Deeply unhappy in her marriage to a man who is infertile because of a dope-smoking habit, Justine soon begins an affair with Holden, the store's newly hired cashier and becomes pregnant. Holden, who has serious issues of his own, steals money from the store's safe for the two of them to run away, but the plan is short-lived when it takes a tragic turn for the worse.

Cast

News & Interviews for The Good Girl

Critic Reviews for The Good Girl

All Critics (158) | Top Critics (40)

Audience Reviews for The Good Girl

½

First they made "Chuck and Buck" (2000). Two years later, screenwriter Mike White and director Miguel Arteta collaborated on "The Good Girl." The highly original and piercing "Chuck and Buck" is by far the better film, but "The Good Girl" has its charms, particularly a beautiful performance from Jake Gyllenhaal as a lonely, mentally unstable college student who calls himself Holden (after the protagonist in "Catcher in the Rye"). Jennifer Aniston, in her first and last interesting film role, plays the main character, a depressed, uneducated store clerk who has an extra-marital affair with Holden that goes awry. She is married to a brainless couch potato played by John C. Reilly. As you'd expect from this filmmaking team, there's much dark humor and deadpan comedy about small-town life. At times the spirit of Todd Solondz is channelled. But nothing really surprising or compelling is ever discovered about the characters, and the comedy grows thin after a half-hour. The actors walk around in a catatonic stupor, going way over the top to dramatize their characters' stagnation and mindlessness. I'm not sure why it's interesting to depict everyone in the heartland as retarded. It certainly bears no relationship to the reality of the heartland, where there is a lot more diversity than that. After a while, it just seemed like easy jokes perpetrated by artists who weren't really challenging themselves. You could think of "Good Girl" as the last mumble-core movie. I'm quite glad that this sub-genre is pretty much dead.

William Dunmyer
William Dunmyer

Super Reviewer

½

I didn't like it. It was so derivative yet miserable, so cheerless yet faux-introspective. Sometimes there were these departures into fantasy and I didn't know what to think of them.

Jennifer Xu
Jennifer Xu

Super Reviewer

½

Jennifer Aniston impresses on this offbeat black comedy. Her low-pitched intensity evokes the seemingly demure Texan who secretly hates her life. The sausage-chain structure of short scenes makes the plot plod towards the end. But laugh-out-loud characters, like a sadistic make-up girl enhance a skillful portrait of a supposedly ordinary life.

Dean McKenna
Dean McKenna

Super Reviewer

A bored Texas housewife begins an affair with a troubled younger man, who works with her at the Retail Rodeo. The supporting characters in this film are truly excellent. Zooey Deschanel and Tim Blake Nelson are fantastic as the main couple's co-workers, Deschanel caking makeup on her face and slipping in snarky comments over the Retail Rodeo's P.A. and Nelson's characteristic commitment to the playing the hick fool. I even found Jennifer Aniston's performance strong, eschewing her Rachel from Friends schtick and adopting a confined gait. The script also succeeded on many levels. The film was able to render the claustrophobic nature of these characters and this place so much so that I almost found myself rooting for Gyllenhaal's unstable character. On a certain level, the script almost convinced me that he had a point. However, the ending is rather predictable, and as the plot thinned, so did my interest. And Justine's penultimate choice makes her a highly "unfeminist" character, one to whom we may be able to relate but ultimately never want to cheer for.

Jim Hunter
Jim Hunter

Super Reviewer

The Good Girl Quotes

News & Features