A Guy Named Joe Reviews

  • Feb 01, 2019

    The best inspiring romance movie ever made!

    The best inspiring romance movie ever made!

  • Feb 23, 2018

    Trumbo comes up with an unconventional view of war and Tracy was solid.

    Trumbo comes up with an unconventional view of war and Tracy was solid.

  • May 11, 2017

    A Guy Named Joe is a decent film. It is about a dead World War II bomber pilot who becomes the guardian angel of another pilot. Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Victor Fleming did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the drama and romance.

    A Guy Named Joe is a decent film. It is about a dead World War II bomber pilot who becomes the guardian angel of another pilot. Spencer Tracy and Van Johnson give good performances. The screenplay is a little slow in places. Victor Fleming did an alright job directing this movie. I liked this motion picture because of the drama and romance.

  • Sep 09, 2016

    A good movie - but a bit disappointed that Esther Williams had such a small part.

    A good movie - but a bit disappointed that Esther Williams had such a small part.

  • May 15, 2014

    Classic movie. I could watch it over and over again!

    Classic movie. I could watch it over and over again!

  • Oct 23, 2012

    good WWII drama made during WWII

    good WWII drama made during WWII

  • Sep 04, 2012

    This is a sweet story (later remade by Steven Spielberg with "Always") that has Spencer tracy playing a guardian angel to a young pilot who falls for his former lover. I also like the fact that there is no guy named Joe in the entire film. Grade: B+

    This is a sweet story (later remade by Steven Spielberg with "Always") that has Spencer tracy playing a guardian angel to a young pilot who falls for his former lover. I also like the fact that there is no guy named Joe in the entire film. Grade: B+

  • Sep 02, 2012

    Set during WWII this is a story about a group of American pilots with Dunne and Tracy being a couple, yes Dunne is a military pilot. Once again, as only few actors can do, Dunne can go from a tough as nails female military pilot to a giddy schoolgirl excited over a fancy dress in one scene. Tracy plays the bachelor pilot, flies alone for pleasure, who is the reckless pilot who only regard is to get the mission done. The always welcome Ward Bond plays the affable acquaintance, friend to both yet understanding to the situation. The twist in the plot happens when Dunne's premonition turns true and Tracy dies in combat and becomes a guarding angel, to protect the other pilots in the military, specifically Van Johnson. With the reluctant guidance of Tracy, Johnson becomes a pilot, and through Bond is introduced to Dunne who become romantically linked. I am always amazed at these war movies done during the period as the budget and time had to be tight and usually the quality is high, this is no exception. Lionel Barrymore plays the Almighty, or at least the top guarding angel of pilots and through his expressive eyebrows conveys a sense of calm and understanding to a new comer to the heavens. It's a long movie, that tends to wander and suddenly we realize where James Cameron got the story for Titanic, the strong female character, the supernatural, and the undying love. I liked the beginning but it became over long and seemed to lose its way and purpose.

    Set during WWII this is a story about a group of American pilots with Dunne and Tracy being a couple, yes Dunne is a military pilot. Once again, as only few actors can do, Dunne can go from a tough as nails female military pilot to a giddy schoolgirl excited over a fancy dress in one scene. Tracy plays the bachelor pilot, flies alone for pleasure, who is the reckless pilot who only regard is to get the mission done. The always welcome Ward Bond plays the affable acquaintance, friend to both yet understanding to the situation. The twist in the plot happens when Dunne's premonition turns true and Tracy dies in combat and becomes a guarding angel, to protect the other pilots in the military, specifically Van Johnson. With the reluctant guidance of Tracy, Johnson becomes a pilot, and through Bond is introduced to Dunne who become romantically linked. I am always amazed at these war movies done during the period as the budget and time had to be tight and usually the quality is high, this is no exception. Lionel Barrymore plays the Almighty, or at least the top guarding angel of pilots and through his expressive eyebrows conveys a sense of calm and understanding to a new comer to the heavens. It's a long movie, that tends to wander and suddenly we realize where James Cameron got the story for Titanic, the strong female character, the supernatural, and the undying love. I liked the beginning but it became over long and seemed to lose its way and purpose.

  • Aug 02, 2011

    I normally like old, nostalgic fantasy movies that include angels, ghosts, or spirits, but "A Guy Named Joe," fell into a typical romantic movie: melodramtic, a bit dull, and not very interesting by the middle of the film.

    I normally like old, nostalgic fantasy movies that include angels, ghosts, or spirits, but "A Guy Named Joe," fell into a typical romantic movie: melodramtic, a bit dull, and not very interesting by the middle of the film.

  • Jan 15, 2010

    A Guy Named Joe is a popcorn movie entertainment in the most classic sense. We are suckered by the maven charm of the inherently self-assured never-miss talent of Irene Dunne, the cocksure wiseguy swagger of Spencer Tracy, the brazen spectacle of the airborne war effort, a creative high-concept plot device and just the romanticism of the whole thing. Victor Fleming---hot off the helm of the two most celebrated and remembered films in American history, The Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind, which he directed both in the same year---was proved a highly capable director to say the least, particularly within the vein of such idealistic Americana as A Guy Named Joe. He was like Mervyn LeRoy, who made greatly satisfying escapist pictures like Random Harvest, but Fleming was notorious for his uber-masculine edge, which comes to life here much more than in either of his 1939 epics. It is this treatment of his surrounding talents that is designed to excite the 1943 viewer. This drippy film uses premonitions, the afterlife and spiritual counseling to drive the story, and we tend to have some premonitions of our own in terms of cogitating the next step ahead after awhile. Legendary screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, though his script feels rushed to conclude, sketches characterizations that the actors bring to formidable life, and not just the two fiery leads but peripheral characters whose functions in the narrative formula are self-evident, like Ward Bond and Van Johnson. It is a lavishly verbose script as well, with positive and negative results. It is, nevertheless, a melodrama, but likewise, it is not entirely such a clearly constructed world of connotations: There is no unambiguous villain posing a threat, save the unseen dogfight opponents, but a humbling test for a wealthy heroic ego. The hero does not escape, nor does he rescue the heroine. He learns to accept the hand he's dealt and the heroine is a whole other character of her own with a quest of her own. A Guy Named Joe is still a pathos-filled tale that appeals to the heightened emotions of the audience, but done with a great deal of industry talent, and an implacable, abstract sense of wonder and novelty as a classic American studio picture. It makes me think of a strip of celluloid whirring from one reel to another between my fingertips.

    A Guy Named Joe is a popcorn movie entertainment in the most classic sense. We are suckered by the maven charm of the inherently self-assured never-miss talent of Irene Dunne, the cocksure wiseguy swagger of Spencer Tracy, the brazen spectacle of the airborne war effort, a creative high-concept plot device and just the romanticism of the whole thing. Victor Fleming---hot off the helm of the two most celebrated and remembered films in American history, The Wizard of Oz and Gone with the Wind, which he directed both in the same year---was proved a highly capable director to say the least, particularly within the vein of such idealistic Americana as A Guy Named Joe. He was like Mervyn LeRoy, who made greatly satisfying escapist pictures like Random Harvest, but Fleming was notorious for his uber-masculine edge, which comes to life here much more than in either of his 1939 epics. It is this treatment of his surrounding talents that is designed to excite the 1943 viewer. This drippy film uses premonitions, the afterlife and spiritual counseling to drive the story, and we tend to have some premonitions of our own in terms of cogitating the next step ahead after awhile. Legendary screenwriter Dalton Trumbo, though his script feels rushed to conclude, sketches characterizations that the actors bring to formidable life, and not just the two fiery leads but peripheral characters whose functions in the narrative formula are self-evident, like Ward Bond and Van Johnson. It is a lavishly verbose script as well, with positive and negative results. It is, nevertheless, a melodrama, but likewise, it is not entirely such a clearly constructed world of connotations: There is no unambiguous villain posing a threat, save the unseen dogfight opponents, but a humbling test for a wealthy heroic ego. The hero does not escape, nor does he rescue the heroine. He learns to accept the hand he's dealt and the heroine is a whole other character of her own with a quest of her own. A Guy Named Joe is still a pathos-filled tale that appeals to the heightened emotions of the audience, but done with a great deal of industry talent, and an implacable, abstract sense of wonder and novelty as a classic American studio picture. It makes me think of a strip of celluloid whirring from one reel to another between my fingertips.