Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 1 - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 1 Reviews

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½ February 15, 2018
(91/100)
This is really a movie more based on emotion as the horcruxes influence Ron and Harry alike. I liked a lot and without doubt immediately watched part 2.
February 14, 2018
I was a bit disappointed with this movie. Not enough action and too slow from what we have previously experienced. The third highest grossing film of 2010.
½ January 29, 2018
grown up potter and friends pull together a half-decent movie
½ January 28, 2018
This is another solid entry in the franchise. It has very good action scenes and very sad moments. It does set up the final film very well but that is my only problem with it. The movie doesn't stand on its own, if you watch this one you almost have to watch the next one right after. As an individual movie this is not the best but it does set up the final film very nicely.
½ January 24, 2018
A return to form with the 7th Harry Potter film - that is finally bringing some coherence and moving to closure of the whole Harry v the Dark Lord story. The scenery and action are great, story line standouts and have some real tension and sense of danger developed. The three stars are in great form as are all the supporting cast. Definitely one of the better films in the franchise.
Super Reviewer
January 14, 2018
The sad, lonely and weird stretch where its just the three main characters lost in the woods rank among the best stuff in the whole series, plus there are some fun heist/escape sequences.
½ January 13, 2018
It was the darkest and most hopeless of all the Potter films. It was the first time where they didn't spend the year at Hogwarts, so it felt very different in that sense and lost some of its charm. Not as fun in a light-hearted sense. Very dramatic and intense.
January 10, 2018
The end is coming in "Death Hallows - Part 1" and at this point in the franchise, director David Yates has found the perfect balance from book to screen. While it may not be as magical as previous outings, the dark and thrilling setup to the finale is still extremely entertaining and the matured performances are a plus.
½ January 5, 2018
A well crafted movie with a good blend of drama, suspense and action, it is the most matured of all the movies, equipped with more logical thinking charactes and coherent events, but stil presents that magical feel innate to the series...This is probably my favorite in the entire franchise.
December 28, 2017
Deathly Hallows part 1 is a magnificent and entertaining adventure film!
December 27, 2017
It was ok, but really slow... And all of it only to tell us what the deathly hallows are.
Hopefully the next one will be more action-filled.
½ December 27, 2017
Exhilarating effects and a beautifully dark ominous tone aren't enough to prevent this from being exactly what it is... half a film. The decision to turn the final book into two films may have been good for the bank account, but it definitely makes this one of the more hollow entrants into the HP series.
"Bellatrix Lestrange: You stupid elf! You could have killed me!
Dobby the House Elf: Dobby never meant to kill! Dobby only meant to maim, or seriously injure!"
December 20, 2017
This film is full of everything we love about Harry Potter but also subverts several expectations we usually have going into a Potter film. We don't really see Hogwarts. It's a gritty, dramatic road flick that REALLY works
½ December 19, 2017
Puntaje Original: 7.0

Por un momento llegué a creer que se convertiría en una aburrida versión de The Pianist en Harry Potter, pero aún conserva la magia que jamás dejará de cautivar.
½ December 10, 2017
Very different to the other movies, and much slower paced but still a fantastic entry. Gritty, heartfelt towards the characters we have grown to love.
½ December 9, 2017
This film does feel like its all a First act, but i suppose it is part 1 of 2. It also does set up the final film nicely.
November 22, 2017
The last book in the Harry Potter saga has been split into two parts. At first, maybe people would think it is to squeeze some more financial mileage out of the series. On the other hand, having watched this installment, there is simply too much complex storytelling involved in this book to cram it into only one two and half hour movie.

This Part 1 is already a very full two and half hours. The drama begins even before the opening credits roll. The special effects have reached a new high point with the trick of using polyjuice potion to create multiple Harry's. The frenetic escape of Harry in Hagrid's motor sidecar is an achievement in action editing. The trio's penetration of the Ministry of Magic to get the locket horcrux is very exciting and tension-filled.

Momentum dips a bit in the midsection as our trio scour the English wilderness for a way to destroy the horcrux. This prolonged section, which some may find boring, dealt more with the personal relationships loyalty of the three friends as challenges are thrown their way. The segment is marked by the hard-to-watch bloodlust of Bellatrix Lestrange and the nobility of Dobby. Watch out too for a most unexpected dance scene which will surely make you smile, if not actually chuckle!

In the third section, we learn what the "deathly hallows" are referred to in the title as our trio learns it from Xenophilius Lovegood. But the main highlight here is a most amazing animated short featurette called "The Tale of Three Brothers" as narrated by Hermione. This Part 1 ends very well with a sky-splitting final cliffhanger sequence.

Its been repeatedly mentioned how the main actors Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint and Emma Watson have all grown up in front of our eyes as this movie series unfolded. Rupert and Emma are both taller than Daniel already! Acting-wise, everyone had likewise improved very much. They all even show some skin here. Yes, even Hermione! The support from the esteemed gallery of British actors and actresses serve the film very well indeed. We saw everyone from all the previous films it seems, except for Maggie Smith.

The direction of David Yates is excellent as he did in the last two films. Yates and screenwriter Steve Kloves got just the proper mix of action, drama and humor needed to make the saga work on screen. This may just be a set-up installment, however, it stands very strong on its own merits. As the last scene faded to black, the audience will definitely develop the resolve to watch out for the concluding part to be released next summer, and witness the epic Battle of Hogwarts.A sullen Minister of Magic Rufus Scrimgeour (Bill Nighy) sets the mood for this seventh and penultimate instalment of Harry Potter. "These are dark times, there's no denying," he intones gravely, pointing out the grim state of affairs facing the nation- murders, disappearances and raids- but reassuring the public, as any politician would, that his Ministry has it all under control. Of course, he is only bluffing, and it doesn't take long before the palpable sense of doom and despair convinces you otherwise.

Welcome back to the magical world of Harry Potter, one that began with wonder and joy, but has since become shrouded in death and darkness. Still visibly distraught from the death of his mentor Professor Albus Dumbledore, Harry is now tasked to continue with the mission of the late Dumbledore- to find and destroy the remaining Horcruxes (accursed objects containing fragments of Voldemort's soul). It doesn't get any easier, since Voldemort is nearing the height of his powers, and his bidders have infiltrated the bureaucracy to paint Harry as a wanted criminal.

There are fewer and fewer allies around- even those within the Order of the Phoenix may have since betrayed their ranks- and the first half hour quickly establishes the danger and urgency of the situation at hand. Members of the Order, including Mad-Eye Moody (Brendan Gleeson) and Hagrid (Robbie Coltrane), attempt to escort Harry to safety- but even that mission is met with an attack from the Death Eaters, culminating in a dizzyingly exciting high-speed flying-bike chase that shouldn't disappoint fans looking for some action sorely missed in the last movie.

Indeed, naysayers who think David Yates doesn't know how to stage thrilling action sequences should think again, as he demonstrates amply that he is just as capable when it comes to staging them. He also displays an uncanny knack for milking suspense out of scenes- in particular, Harry, Hermoine and Ron's daring raid on the Ministry of Magic and their subsequent visit to Godric's Hollow, Harry's birthplace and home to Bathilda Bagshot, a magician and dear friend to Dumbledore. These brim with nail-biting tension, and Yates plays them out nicely to set your pulse racing at the end.

The crux of this film however lies in the relationships between Harry, Hermoine and Ron as they set off in the middle of the film across the bleak English countryside on their quest to discover the means to destroy the Horcruxes. On the run from Voldemort, the trio find the immensity of their journey taking a toll on them. Harry and Ron's friendship begins to fray as Ron grows suspect of Hermoine's affections for Harry. Meanwhile, Harry can barely conceal his frustration with getting no headway and starts losing his temper at Ron.

Infused with a profound sense of isolation and loss, this middle stretch in the film may be tedious for some impatient viewers, but fans will be rewarded with probably the richest depiction of the relationships between the characters since the first two movies. One scene where Harry and Hermoine suddenly decide to dance together to the tune of Nick Cave's The Children playing on the radio is lyrical in its depiction of their desperate attempt to find levity in a world that affords none. Yes, their friendship strong and deep since the beginning will be tested, and Yates delivers an emotional payoff towards the end of the film that is truly poignant.

Thanks to the decision to split the final book into two films, Yates doesn't hurry through these scenes. Instead, he allows the audience to experience the frustration, jealousy and uncertainty of his characters, and allows for Radcliffe, Watson and Grint to display some fine acting with the minimalest distraction from any visual effects. The additional time also turns out to be a blessing for fans and audiences, allowing them the opportunity to see their favourite supporting characters back on screen- most prominently of course Dobby the elf who returns to give the movie a touching finale.

Amidst the gloom, screenwriter Steve Kloves again provides for rare welcome moments of levity. Harry's escort mission is aided by magical decoys of Harry, one of them wearing a bra. To get to the Ministry of Magic, one needs to flush oneself down a toilet bowl. These occasional sparks of humour enliven a film that is otherwise ominous and menacing. Kloves however fumbles slightly with the lengthy expository, and those who have not read the book will find themselves struggling to catch up with the significance of certain characters (e.g. Sirius' brother, Regulus Arcturus Black) and certain events (e.g. Bathilda turning into a slithering serpent).

Still Kloves never had an enviable task to begin with, and Yates- at his most confident here- guides the proceedings along admirably, unfolding them briskly at the start, then settling in for a deliberately measured pace and finally picking up speed for as much as a climax as this first- parter can have. His assuredness also shows in his artistic choices, especially a wayang-kulit-like animated sequence telling the story of the Deathly Hallows.

Though we know better than to expect the grand showdown between Harry and Voldemort by the end of the film, there is still a distinct sense that what we have seen so far is only a build-up for something bigger and far more astounding. But even as a prelude, this seventh film is notable in its own right, a tense and thrilling experience darker, scarier and more mature than any of its predecessors."Deathly Hallows Part 1" follows the book closely, but misses out on a few interesting scenes, and then makes up a few additional scenes that are poignant and incredibly welcome.

In the beginning, it seems like the film's skipping through the book's content very quickly, but it makes sense, when you realise how much is going on. At the end, the beginning is far away, although the journey there doesn't make it seem like a long while.

General opinion seems to be that it drags in the middle, but, let's face it, so did the book. There's no real reason to complain about Endless Camping Trips at all, because the film moves from plot point to set piece to plot point all the time. There's some clever ways the film handles its exposition, although it is not without its faults.

The trio's acting is the second best thing in this film. Emma has improved loads over the past few years, and she seems to be at the top of her game in this film. Her acting is stellar. As usual, Grint gets saddled with the role of comic relief, but he also gets his chance to shine in an array of emotional scenes. Daniel manages to carry the story as the main character. The three manage to stand their own very well without the presence of the adult actors.

Speaking of adult actors, Nick Morran's Scabior is a delightful character - he's slightly perverted and he has a bit of a Jack Sparrow vibe going on. Peter Mullan's Yaxley was impressive and managed to be quite threatening. It is a shame that we see so little of Bill Nighy's character, the new Minister for Magic, Rufus Scrimgeour. The character was regrettably cut from the previous film, and I wish they hadn't, if only to see more of Nighy's impressive performance. Old-time familiar faces are great, as usual. Fiona Shaw gets but one shot of screen time, but the look in her eyes says so much about her character. Jasoon Isaacs is terrific as a broken and devastated Lucius Malfoy. The lack of Rickman is a shame, but the presence of Bonham Carter makes up for it. Big baddie Ralph Fiennes manages to finally be a menacing, scary Voldemort in the film's first scenes, but as the story progresses and he gets appearances in a few messy, rushed and disappointing visions, Voldemort's actions just don't continue being an ominous cloud of danger, as they should be.

The film's greatest achievement, however, is the animated sequence detailing the "Tale of the Three Brothers", an interesting wizard fairytale. It is a daring move from the filmmakers, one that will pleasantly surprise the audience.

The biggest letdown is how the film doesn't just keep going. After two-and-a-half hours, it doesn't feel like the story's finished. A few scenes were added to make the climax more exciting, but it's just a downright shame that the movie doesn't just continue for another hour or two.
November 20, 2017
8/10

It feels like the most character driven and personal out of all the Harry Potter movies. We stock with Harry, Hermione and Ron all throughout, and although they get into their fair share of action and thrilling scenes, we're left feeling more connected to them due to the little moments we share.
November 7, 2017
Plot to kill Harry Potter
½ October 28, 2017
The most uneventful.
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