Host Reviews

February 7, 2021
An effective shocker for our quarantine times.
February 7, 2021
For what it is, it works.
December 5, 2020
Until someone makes a film about a haunted sourdough starter, this ingenious horror movie will remain the zeitgeistiest thing to emerge from lockdown.
December 4, 2020
Good directors embrace limitations, and Rob Savage has more than proven his worth on this front.
December 4, 2020
It's still rubbish - you'll be constantly yelling, "Just turn on the bloody lights!" - but a good kind of rubbish.
August 31, 2020
There are well-placed jump scares, ones made all the more impressive by the fact we are seeing them via webcam.
August 11, 2020
The characters, performances, and the skillful way [director] Rob Savage sets up his scares really save this movie.
August 3, 2020
An adrenaline-spiking fresh take on a well-worn horror format, Host transcends its high-concept premise to deliver original ideas - and scream-worthy surprises.
August 3, 2020
Host is a lean, nasty little exercise that might not linger for very long but it shows what can be done during this difficult time.
July 31, 2020
Even if Savage didn't ground the film so perfectly in the inherent social terror of moment - setting this specifically in the time of pandemic, where Zoom parties aren't a thing, they're the only thing - Host would still be a nerveshredder.
July 31, 2020
As impressive as the stunts and practical effects are, especially for a film that came together so quickly, much of it will be recognizable to seasoned horror fans. Still, for a brisk hour packed with chills, it succeeds at scaring you.
July 30, 2020
Though the film gets off to a slow start, once the scares start coming, Savage has his audience in the palm of his hand.
July 30, 2020
"Host" observes uncannily the supernatural, ephemeral, and material worlds colliding together, gesturing toward an uncertain future.
July 30, 2020
Savage and co-writers Gemma Hurley and Jed Shepherd do a fine enough job setting up their movie's better set pieces, but it's hard to overlook some obvious foreshadowing here, and some ham-fisted symbolism there.