The Hours Reviews

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February 11, 2008
David Hare's screen adaptation reduces Woolf and her art to a set of feminist stances and a few plot points, without reference to style or form.
February 27, 2007
June 24, 2006
A boldly realised, affecting work.
August 7, 2004
A puzzling and forbidding strangeness.
November 25, 2003
March 25, 2003
An elegant movie-triptych - its constituent, handsomely mounted panels are inhabited by three earnest, meticulous performances.
January 29, 2003
Lyrical and surprisingly uplifting -- if you're willing to invest full attention.
January 17, 2003
The film actually improves on Cunningham's novel, thanks to gorgeous cinematography, a deft script by playwright David Hare ... a mournful, melodious but never intrusive score by Philip Glass and a superb cast.
January 17, 2003
A compelling, moving film that respects its audience and its source material.
January 17, 2003
As stunning an acting showcase as you'll find.
January 17, 2003
The acting, for the most part, is terrific, although the actors must struggle with the fact that they're playing characters who sometimes feel more like literary conceits than flesh-and-blood humans.
January 17, 2003
The performances are so beautifully synchronized -- for which Hare, Daldry and editor Peter Boyle also deserve credit -- that it is impossible to choose one as being better than another.
January 17, 2003
Virtually humorless and extremely talky, the movie takes place during one day in each woman's life, although it moves so slowly it often feels like a week.
Top Critic
January 16, 2003
Fragmented and stinking vaguely of literary pretentiousness, The Hours is a stretch -- it's missing the spinal fusion that might have held it together with the kind of cinematic coherence I found sadly lacking.
January 16, 2003
Though Daldry elicits brilliant performances, particularly from Meryl Streep and Claire Danes, on balance The Hours is more pretentious than penetrating about existential despair.
January 16, 2003
Some moviegoers may interpret The Hours as waving a banner for gay life. Actually, it waves a banner for individuality in a world that does not always sanction such a stance.
January 16, 2003
A moving essay about the specter of death, especially suicide.
January 13, 2003
This movie is in love with female victimization.
January 10, 2003
It's a collection of elusive moments and connections, a musing on nothing less than the meaning of life itself.
January 10, 2003
You don't just love the movie for its structure but for the haunted people in it, making each other miserable, but forcing each other to face who they are.
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