Howards End Reviews

  • Sep 12, 2020

    This is a wonderful movie and although I haven't read the book, my husband read it and commented on how the movie closely follows it. The acting is amazing and the scenery... wow.... Doesn't get much better than this

    This is a wonderful movie and although I haven't read the book, my husband read it and commented on how the movie closely follows it. The acting is amazing and the scenery... wow.... Doesn't get much better than this

  • Jul 29, 2020

    Great overall production. Daftly British, though never too dry to be intriguing and worthwhile. Vanessa Redgrave and Emma Thompson have unmatched flowing elegance.

    Great overall production. Daftly British, though never too dry to be intriguing and worthwhile. Vanessa Redgrave and Emma Thompson have unmatched flowing elegance.

  • Jul 28, 2020

    Howards End is a 1992 romantic drama film based upon the 1910 novel, and directed by James Ivory 🍿 It's ok, but I feel mixed about this one πŸ˜‰ I'd recommend it if you like this genre, but if not then probably give it a miss πŸ‘πŸΌπŸ‘ŽπŸΌ

    Howards End is a 1992 romantic drama film based upon the 1910 novel, and directed by James Ivory 🍿 It's ok, but I feel mixed about this one πŸ˜‰ I'd recommend it if you like this genre, but if not then probably give it a miss πŸ‘πŸΌπŸ‘ŽπŸΌ

  • Jul 10, 2020

    Riveting stuff because of its stars.

    Riveting stuff because of its stars.

  • Jul 01, 2020

    "Howards End" is a benign entertainment with some sophisticated dialogue and characters.

    "Howards End" is a benign entertainment with some sophisticated dialogue and characters.

  • Apr 30, 2020

    This was a very slow and boring movie, but the acting was exceptional, especially by Emma Thompson.

    This was a very slow and boring movie, but the acting was exceptional, especially by Emma Thompson.

  • Apr 15, 2020

    A beautifully-crafted intertwined story about class systems in the Edwardian England. The deep meaning unveiled by the personal choices and conflicts still rings true in modern times. Fun fact: the actress who played the elder Mrs.Wilcox (Vanessa Redgrave) wasn't sure she could join the film until the very last minute; and only when she was in the make-up chair, she found out about the role had she been mistakenly believed that she would be playing the younger Mrs.Wilcox.

    A beautifully-crafted intertwined story about class systems in the Edwardian England. The deep meaning unveiled by the personal choices and conflicts still rings true in modern times. Fun fact: the actress who played the elder Mrs.Wilcox (Vanessa Redgrave) wasn't sure she could join the film until the very last minute; and only when she was in the make-up chair, she found out about the role had she been mistakenly believed that she would be playing the younger Mrs.Wilcox.

  • Nov 04, 2019

    Merchant/Ivory films are often bashed for seeming cold, clinical at altogether too focused on shiny surfaces featuring gorgeous cinematography and lavish costumes to compensate for a lack of depth. I would strongly disagree with these critics as they adapt literary classics full of characters so colorful and complex that it would seem impossible to translate them to the screen and yet they are able to blend social commentary with compelling relationship drama. In this film we are drawn in immediately by the warm, emotionally resonant performances and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's smart deceptively intelligent screenplay that relaxes into the languid pace that makes Forster's work such an experience. This was arguably the best film of 1992 and I am shocked that it did not win the Best Picture Academy Award when considering how weak the category is and the fact that this film is truly a masterpiece. After a brief engagement to the wealthy Charles Wilcox, James Wilby, the passionate and fiery Helen Schlegel, Helena Bonham Carter, returns to her more prim sister Margaret, Emma Thompson, in London. Margaret develops a close friendship with Wilcox's mother Ruth, Vanessa Redgrave, who bequeaths her family's estate, Howards End, to her when she passes away. Her domineering husband Henry, Anthony Hopkins, and their children throw away this will but despite this action an attraction develops between Margaret and Henry. After Henry provides incorrect information to a lower class young man, Leonard Bast, Samuel West, about his job and essentially ruins his life a rift develops between the couple and yet the two are married. Obsessed with having Bast earn revenge an angered Schlegel brings him and his slattern of a wife, Jackie, Nicola Duffett, to their wedding. Henry is forced to confess to a previous affair between Jackie and himself while Bast and Schlegel consummate their relationship with tragic consequences. The interpretation that the film provides of it's class based story is far darker than that which is presented in the novel as Henry is not softened at the end of the film and the eternal power struggle between men and women and idealists and cynics. We understand from early on in the film that Margaret is a very lonely woman and despite her cheery expressions and lively conversation she struggles to find a kindred spirit in repressed Edwardian society. When she witnesses a fleeting moment of affection between the Wilcoxes the desperation on her face is clear and the crushing loneliness she has experienced for most of her life is what she keeps in mind when tolerating her husband's coldness and cruelty. Both are aware that they are entering into more of a business arrangement than a loving marriage when they are united and the quiet struggle between them provides the main source of drama in the film. We get the wonderful sense of Margaret being honest and open for the only time in the film in her early interactions with Ruth as she meets a woman who accepts her for her mind and her intellectualism as much as her warmth and cheerful spirit. Ruth is equally out of place in the repressed society that surrounds her and for a brief period in time the two women find a soul mate of sorts and experience the world with a kindred spirit by their side. The tearing away of that sisterhood is tragic and in the wake of this loss and with a great desire for something resembling love from a man Margaret turns to a man whom she believes can protect her. It is in the relationships that the Schlegels have with men that we see the divide between genders and classes. Margaret is condescended by her new husband who views her as charming but provincial and has disgust for her apparent lack of emotional repression. This is not to say that he does not expect her to tolerate all of the misdeeds he has committed and his lack of compassion in her moments of need shows that he truly does not care for her. Schlegel's romance with Bast is different in that she ostensibly holds power over him due to his lower social class but her investment in him is hopeless as the connections that she has will do little to help him. His horrifying death will likely scar her for life and the two sisters stand essentially without men as Helen's great love has died and Margaret has a man who expects unconditional love without providing any support of his own. The performances are perfectly pitched as Thompson receives arguably her greatest role in Schlegel who gives her the opportunity to present wide emotional range while having long periods of quiet introspection. She is a technically skilled actress but she has the ability to make dialogue sound heartfelt and delivers cutting remarks as though it is her second nature during confrontations with Hopkins. A richly deserved Best Actress Academy Award win. Supporting her is a fervid young Bonham Carter who convinces us completely of her transition from carefree young radical to angered and impassioned lover. Few actresses can make a character as consistently furious as Helen compelling but Bonham Carter layers her performance and ensures that she does not become a hysterical caricature. Hopkins is excellent as the closed off and dispassionate but this film is really a showcase for Thompson as The Remains of the Day (1993) served as a vehicle for Hopkins. This is cinema at it's finest as this production provides it's own interpretation of a story that deserves to be told and extracts fine work from all involved.

    Merchant/Ivory films are often bashed for seeming cold, clinical at altogether too focused on shiny surfaces featuring gorgeous cinematography and lavish costumes to compensate for a lack of depth. I would strongly disagree with these critics as they adapt literary classics full of characters so colorful and complex that it would seem impossible to translate them to the screen and yet they are able to blend social commentary with compelling relationship drama. In this film we are drawn in immediately by the warm, emotionally resonant performances and Ruth Prawer Jhabvala's smart deceptively intelligent screenplay that relaxes into the languid pace that makes Forster's work such an experience. This was arguably the best film of 1992 and I am shocked that it did not win the Best Picture Academy Award when considering how weak the category is and the fact that this film is truly a masterpiece. After a brief engagement to the wealthy Charles Wilcox, James Wilby, the passionate and fiery Helen Schlegel, Helena Bonham Carter, returns to her more prim sister Margaret, Emma Thompson, in London. Margaret develops a close friendship with Wilcox's mother Ruth, Vanessa Redgrave, who bequeaths her family's estate, Howards End, to her when she passes away. Her domineering husband Henry, Anthony Hopkins, and their children throw away this will but despite this action an attraction develops between Margaret and Henry. After Henry provides incorrect information to a lower class young man, Leonard Bast, Samuel West, about his job and essentially ruins his life a rift develops between the couple and yet the two are married. Obsessed with having Bast earn revenge an angered Schlegel brings him and his slattern of a wife, Jackie, Nicola Duffett, to their wedding. Henry is forced to confess to a previous affair between Jackie and himself while Bast and Schlegel consummate their relationship with tragic consequences. The interpretation that the film provides of it's class based story is far darker than that which is presented in the novel as Henry is not softened at the end of the film and the eternal power struggle between men and women and idealists and cynics. We understand from early on in the film that Margaret is a very lonely woman and despite her cheery expressions and lively conversation she struggles to find a kindred spirit in repressed Edwardian society. When she witnesses a fleeting moment of affection between the Wilcoxes the desperation on her face is clear and the crushing loneliness she has experienced for most of her life is what she keeps in mind when tolerating her husband's coldness and cruelty. Both are aware that they are entering into more of a business arrangement than a loving marriage when they are united and the quiet struggle between them provides the main source of drama in the film. We get the wonderful sense of Margaret being honest and open for the only time in the film in her early interactions with Ruth as she meets a woman who accepts her for her mind and her intellectualism as much as her warmth and cheerful spirit. Ruth is equally out of place in the repressed society that surrounds her and for a brief period in time the two women find a soul mate of sorts and experience the world with a kindred spirit by their side. The tearing away of that sisterhood is tragic and in the wake of this loss and with a great desire for something resembling love from a man Margaret turns to a man whom she believes can protect her. It is in the relationships that the Schlegels have with men that we see the divide between genders and classes. Margaret is condescended by her new husband who views her as charming but provincial and has disgust for her apparent lack of emotional repression. This is not to say that he does not expect her to tolerate all of the misdeeds he has committed and his lack of compassion in her moments of need shows that he truly does not care for her. Schlegel's romance with Bast is different in that she ostensibly holds power over him due to his lower social class but her investment in him is hopeless as the connections that she has will do little to help him. His horrifying death will likely scar her for life and the two sisters stand essentially without men as Helen's great love has died and Margaret has a man who expects unconditional love without providing any support of his own. The performances are perfectly pitched as Thompson receives arguably her greatest role in Schlegel who gives her the opportunity to present wide emotional range while having long periods of quiet introspection. She is a technically skilled actress but she has the ability to make dialogue sound heartfelt and delivers cutting remarks as though it is her second nature during confrontations with Hopkins. A richly deserved Best Actress Academy Award win. Supporting her is a fervid young Bonham Carter who convinces us completely of her transition from carefree young radical to angered and impassioned lover. Few actresses can make a character as consistently furious as Helen compelling but Bonham Carter layers her performance and ensures that she does not become a hysterical caricature. Hopkins is excellent as the closed off and dispassionate but this film is really a showcase for Thompson as The Remains of the Day (1993) served as a vehicle for Hopkins. This is cinema at it's finest as this production provides it's own interpretation of a story that deserves to be told and extracts fine work from all involved.

  • Oct 28, 2019

    I love period dramas but had never watched this ... I was really disappointed, slow paced, the story skips confusingly along & the ending makes little sense. The cast is fantastic & the acting is good but other than that I struggle to see what everyone seems to see in this film.

    I love period dramas but had never watched this ... I was really disappointed, slow paced, the story skips confusingly along & the ending makes little sense. The cast is fantastic & the acting is good but other than that I struggle to see what everyone seems to see in this film.

  • Sep 05, 2019

    One of my all time favorites!

    One of my all time favorites!