I Am Reviews

  • Feb 25, 2020

    A light, pop message that equates to "all you need is love," undermined by its unquestioning reliance on pseudo-science.

    A light, pop message that equates to "all you need is love," undermined by its unquestioning reliance on pseudo-science.

  • Jun 21, 2019

    One of my favorite documentaries.

    One of my favorite documentaries.

  • Feb 11, 2018

    i want see much more this movie doc..

    i want see much more this movie doc..

  • Nov 23, 2017

    I was so moved by this documentary! Seriously thought provoking. I'll be watching it again. ????

    I was so moved by this documentary! Seriously thought provoking. I'll be watching it again. ????

  • Jun 09, 2016

    An ambitious documentary that follows a successful man asking selfless questions. There's a lot of uplifting insight and hopeful perspective from the interviews. In the end though, I think they successfully answered what's wrong with our world, but weren't able to answer how to fix it in ways that are applicable or specific enough.

    An ambitious documentary that follows a successful man asking selfless questions. There's a lot of uplifting insight and hopeful perspective from the interviews. In the end though, I think they successfully answered what's wrong with our world, but weren't able to answer how to fix it in ways that are applicable or specific enough.

  • May 27, 2016

    This movie may not be critically acclaimed, it is worth seeing, so we can examine our own values and our choices are made to benefit our fellowman, not just ourselves.

    This movie may not be critically acclaimed, it is worth seeing, so we can examine our own values and our choices are made to benefit our fellowman, not just ourselves.

  • Oct 21, 2015

    Not sure why the critics don't like movies that show a positive light on this world. This documentary moved me to chills. Reminded me of the Jimmy V espy speech. Love more.

    Not sure why the critics don't like movies that show a positive light on this world. This documentary moved me to chills. Reminded me of the Jimmy V espy speech. Love more.

  • Oct 14, 2015

    Although there is something to be said about Tom Shadyac's earnest conviction, he's no better a director when he's making documentaries than he is making lowbrow comedy films. The pretentiously titled "I Am" is little more than a hopeless vanity film masquerading as activism, and the main problem is that it dabbles in dubious social and scientific ideas without going the extra mile to prove them logically. I actually researched and contemplated the film's ideas, and found them to be utter nonsense. After all, if all it took to fix the world was for us to love each other unconditionally, then why is the world still troubled despite the innate capability of unconditional love in human beings? Humans are not without love, and yet there is still violence, greed, and ignorance plaguing mankind. I wonder if the director has an answer for that beyond the jaded hippie slogans that I've come to expect from a clearly privileged Hollywood director. The film also goes out of its way to demonize competition and self-interest, even though competition and self-interest are just as natural and integral to human existence as love and co-operation. In fact, the film's director spent so much time preaching about love and co-operation that he forgot about the fact that competition and self-interest have always been the driving forces of human progress. If someone didn't decide they wanted something better than what we already have, then modern society, along with everything we take for granted, would simply not exist. If that wasn't a bitter enough pill to swallow, the film goes through contortions to preach that we as humans are actually an interconnected whole, using dubious science and questionable logic to reinforce what is ultimately a tired, unproven dogma that is typical of so many Hollywood morons. To be fair, the film does ask some fine questions that are worthy of consideration and perhaps debate, but why on Earth should I trust them with the director of "Bruce Almighty" and "The Nutty Professor"? Furthermore, however honest the director is trying to be, how can I trust someone who clearly went for the rosiest sounding conclusion, and didn't bother researching his ideas properly? Worse still, he failed to provide a rational counterargument, choosing instead to appropriate any quote, interview, or slick film-making technique to validate his argument. Consequently, what we're left with is a sentimental assemblage of stock footage and weapons-grade hogwash. In turn, Tom Shadyac ends up sounding more like Robert Tilton on Ritalin, and I say that because the clearly proselytizing agenda of the film is no different to that of the right-wing evangelical Christians. That in itself is something I find ironic because the film goes on and on about the evils of a consumerist society in such a stereotypically heavy-handed left-wing manner, but it ultimately wallows in the same narrative that created the kind of world that, supposedly, is the problem to begin with. It's too bad that Mr. Shadyac doesn't realize that the world is far more complex and sophisticated than such buzzwords as "love" and "greed". Had he researched his ideas properly and looked for both sides of his central argument, this could have been a genuinely thought-provoking examination of the human condition, perhaps with the potential to spark real debate. Instead, we have a barely intelligent, ham-fisted sermon orated by someone who ultimately comes across as yet another demagogue.

    Although there is something to be said about Tom Shadyac's earnest conviction, he's no better a director when he's making documentaries than he is making lowbrow comedy films. The pretentiously titled "I Am" is little more than a hopeless vanity film masquerading as activism, and the main problem is that it dabbles in dubious social and scientific ideas without going the extra mile to prove them logically. I actually researched and contemplated the film's ideas, and found them to be utter nonsense. After all, if all it took to fix the world was for us to love each other unconditionally, then why is the world still troubled despite the innate capability of unconditional love in human beings? Humans are not without love, and yet there is still violence, greed, and ignorance plaguing mankind. I wonder if the director has an answer for that beyond the jaded hippie slogans that I've come to expect from a clearly privileged Hollywood director. The film also goes out of its way to demonize competition and self-interest, even though competition and self-interest are just as natural and integral to human existence as love and co-operation. In fact, the film's director spent so much time preaching about love and co-operation that he forgot about the fact that competition and self-interest have always been the driving forces of human progress. If someone didn't decide they wanted something better than what we already have, then modern society, along with everything we take for granted, would simply not exist. If that wasn't a bitter enough pill to swallow, the film goes through contortions to preach that we as humans are actually an interconnected whole, using dubious science and questionable logic to reinforce what is ultimately a tired, unproven dogma that is typical of so many Hollywood morons. To be fair, the film does ask some fine questions that are worthy of consideration and perhaps debate, but why on Earth should I trust them with the director of "Bruce Almighty" and "The Nutty Professor"? Furthermore, however honest the director is trying to be, how can I trust someone who clearly went for the rosiest sounding conclusion, and didn't bother researching his ideas properly? Worse still, he failed to provide a rational counterargument, choosing instead to appropriate any quote, interview, or slick film-making technique to validate his argument. Consequently, what we're left with is a sentimental assemblage of stock footage and weapons-grade hogwash. In turn, Tom Shadyac ends up sounding more like Robert Tilton on Ritalin, and I say that because the clearly proselytizing agenda of the film is no different to that of the right-wing evangelical Christians. That in itself is something I find ironic because the film goes on and on about the evils of a consumerist society in such a stereotypically heavy-handed left-wing manner, but it ultimately wallows in the same narrative that created the kind of world that, supposedly, is the problem to begin with. It's too bad that Mr. Shadyac doesn't realize that the world is far more complex and sophisticated than such buzzwords as "love" and "greed". Had he researched his ideas properly and looked for both sides of his central argument, this could have been a genuinely thought-provoking examination of the human condition, perhaps with the potential to spark real debate. Instead, we have a barely intelligent, ham-fisted sermon orated by someone who ultimately comes across as yet another demagogue.

  • Jul 06, 2015

    A good documentary about nature and the human condition. Streaming on Netflix.

    A good documentary about nature and the human condition. Streaming on Netflix.

  • Jun 23, 2015

    There is so much wrong, idiotic and insulting in this movie one does not know where to begin. In essence it is a pile of steaming hypocritical white people nonsense. The story: White male uses various inventions of industrial and technological capitalism, is wildly successful, goes to hospital and is treated with various helpful devices invented via industrial and technological capitalism, gets better, then uses various devices invented and perfected via capitalism to interview people who have benefited immensely from the wealth created by capitalism to put forth the silliest treatise against capitalism imaginable. Does this obviously smart middle aged white progressives honestly think Native American tribes did not go to war with each other..often brutally? Or that moving to a mobile home worth 7 figures in Malibu is a sacrifice? What's most insulting about these middle life crisis progressive meltdowns is that they are almost always people who will never really need to toil again hectoring and guilt tripping young people with ambition who do, in fact, want EXACTLY what this guy wanted 25 years before . He got it, but now that his testosterone levels have dropped he wants everyone to go all beta male and bike from their Malibu homes - ha! - to teach at Pepperdine... you know, that "local university" known the world over for producing one Mother Teresa after another... snark. Also I'm personally sick of people intoning that the world is horrible when, in fact, the world is gorgeous and they themselves are blessed. Finally these blind, whole foods patron rants always end up in one banal place because the logical end of their thesis is too hard to stomach. In order to achieve the fantasia they want they go to "love is the answer" , which, of course, is nice but is not really the avenue to "saving the planet" ... The fact is what this type of hippie nonsense really needs to achieve it's "let's all live in tee pees and be in a nice community" is a mass die off of humans. 3 billion less of us and we round the corner toward what this filmmaker thinks would be a fine world. Meanwhile I suspect he will continue to live off the fruits of capitalism whether in the film business or off the tuition paid by the rich parents of his students. Oh those horrible people who create wealth! How dare they allow me to shop at Whole Foods and hang out along the gorgeous California coast!

    There is so much wrong, idiotic and insulting in this movie one does not know where to begin. In essence it is a pile of steaming hypocritical white people nonsense. The story: White male uses various inventions of industrial and technological capitalism, is wildly successful, goes to hospital and is treated with various helpful devices invented via industrial and technological capitalism, gets better, then uses various devices invented and perfected via capitalism to interview people who have benefited immensely from the wealth created by capitalism to put forth the silliest treatise against capitalism imaginable. Does this obviously smart middle aged white progressives honestly think Native American tribes did not go to war with each other..often brutally? Or that moving to a mobile home worth 7 figures in Malibu is a sacrifice? What's most insulting about these middle life crisis progressive meltdowns is that they are almost always people who will never really need to toil again hectoring and guilt tripping young people with ambition who do, in fact, want EXACTLY what this guy wanted 25 years before . He got it, but now that his testosterone levels have dropped he wants everyone to go all beta male and bike from their Malibu homes - ha! - to teach at Pepperdine... you know, that "local university" known the world over for producing one Mother Teresa after another... snark. Also I'm personally sick of people intoning that the world is horrible when, in fact, the world is gorgeous and they themselves are blessed. Finally these blind, whole foods patron rants always end up in one banal place because the logical end of their thesis is too hard to stomach. In order to achieve the fantasia they want they go to "love is the answer" , which, of course, is nice but is not really the avenue to "saving the planet" ... The fact is what this type of hippie nonsense really needs to achieve it's "let's all live in tee pees and be in a nice community" is a mass die off of humans. 3 billion less of us and we round the corner toward what this filmmaker thinks would be a fine world. Meanwhile I suspect he will continue to live off the fruits of capitalism whether in the film business or off the tuition paid by the rich parents of his students. Oh those horrible people who create wealth! How dare they allow me to shop at Whole Foods and hang out along the gorgeous California coast!