Interiors Reviews

  • Jan 21, 2020

    This Eve lady, the mother, needs to get laid. She's definitely a dysfunctional person. Extremely controlling, puts her nose in everything where she doesn't need to put it. It's interesting to see how psychologically affected the daughters have become due to the dysfunction of the relationship of their parents, especially Renata. You can see how she's becoming a lot like her mother. The change of pace kind of changes when Pearl comes into the picture. It's almost like she brings this much needed color and lightness into the air that this pale-palette family needs in their life. Interesting to see how Arthur, the father, has moved on with his life and has found peace and happiness in doing so while everybody else finds it hard to do so. That scene where Joey imagines her mother walking into the ocean and then gets saved by Mike and literally gets life blown back into her by her new mother is very powerful and impactful. There's a lot of metaphors going on during this scene. It's kind of like Joey being washed and reborn. It's a new start for her. Wow, the last 10 minutes were really good. I think the ending was brilliant. Regardless or not if Eve really did die in the ocean, her death symbolizes a new chance of starting fresh and moving on with life. I think it was for the best. Whether or not Joey imagined her mother walking into the ocean, this symbolizes Joey's reluctance to accept Pearl as he new mother and how she doesn't want to let her mother go. I think Interiors is a perfect title since the movie is about people's interiors - how we really are on the inside and how we can mask our inner problems with something like obsessing over the interior of a house instead of facing our problems. Definitely not your typical Woody Allen movie. Where as Woody's movies usually make you laugh and smile, this one drains you. He must have been going through a divorce or some kind of traumatic relationship or family experience at the time. This is by far Woody's most introspective and least funny movie. But, you have to take art for what it is and this is in fact another great addition to Woody's work and reminds me why I love Woody so much and why he's one of my favorite directors. I think the only reason I'd rewatch this movie would be to remind myself of family and how important it is to let go and move on with life. That death is just the beginning to a new life. I'd like to download it so I can examine the movie in greater depth.

    This Eve lady, the mother, needs to get laid. She's definitely a dysfunctional person. Extremely controlling, puts her nose in everything where she doesn't need to put it. It's interesting to see how psychologically affected the daughters have become due to the dysfunction of the relationship of their parents, especially Renata. You can see how she's becoming a lot like her mother. The change of pace kind of changes when Pearl comes into the picture. It's almost like she brings this much needed color and lightness into the air that this pale-palette family needs in their life. Interesting to see how Arthur, the father, has moved on with his life and has found peace and happiness in doing so while everybody else finds it hard to do so. That scene where Joey imagines her mother walking into the ocean and then gets saved by Mike and literally gets life blown back into her by her new mother is very powerful and impactful. There's a lot of metaphors going on during this scene. It's kind of like Joey being washed and reborn. It's a new start for her. Wow, the last 10 minutes were really good. I think the ending was brilliant. Regardless or not if Eve really did die in the ocean, her death symbolizes a new chance of starting fresh and moving on with life. I think it was for the best. Whether or not Joey imagined her mother walking into the ocean, this symbolizes Joey's reluctance to accept Pearl as he new mother and how she doesn't want to let her mother go. I think Interiors is a perfect title since the movie is about people's interiors - how we really are on the inside and how we can mask our inner problems with something like obsessing over the interior of a house instead of facing our problems. Definitely not your typical Woody Allen movie. Where as Woody's movies usually make you laugh and smile, this one drains you. He must have been going through a divorce or some kind of traumatic relationship or family experience at the time. This is by far Woody's most introspective and least funny movie. But, you have to take art for what it is and this is in fact another great addition to Woody's work and reminds me why I love Woody so much and why he's one of my favorite directors. I think the only reason I'd rewatch this movie would be to remind myself of family and how important it is to let go and move on with life. That death is just the beginning to a new life. I'd like to download it so I can examine the movie in greater depth.

  • Aug 12, 2019

    Fresh from the winning Oscars for Annie Hall, Woody Allen's first dramatic outing is a maladroit Bergmanesque critique on dysfunctional mother-daughter dynamics in a domestic drama about three adult daughters sustaining the derangement of their elderly mother as she goes through a divorce.

    Fresh from the winning Oscars for Annie Hall, Woody Allen's first dramatic outing is a maladroit Bergmanesque critique on dysfunctional mother-daughter dynamics in a domestic drama about three adult daughters sustaining the derangement of their elderly mother as she goes through a divorce.

  • May 06, 2019

    Woody Allen made three of his best films back to back in Annie Hall (1977), Interiors and Manhattan (1979). Of the three Interiors is the least comedic as it takes the struggles of the dysfunctional family it follows seriously and scenes that would be played for laughs in other Allen films are seen as containing the horror that they really would. Any Geraldine Page film is worth watching and this film contains one of her best late career performances as the family matriarch, she was absolutely robbed of the Best Actress Academy Award in 1979. The writing of the film is more sensitive to women than most Woody Allen screenplays and the strange relationships that the daughters have with their respective husbands are viewed through the female lens. How I wish that Woody Allen was not an absolute creep in real life so that I could unabashedly love this film but as it stands it's one of the best family dramas I have seen. Eve, Geraldine Page, is the theatrical, high maintenance matriarch of a dysfunctional family that features her selfish husband Arthur, E.G Marshall, who favors his daughter Joey, Mary Beth Hurt, who has become a flighty adult. The daughter he neglected, Renata, Diane Keaton, is a professional success with an aggressive, boorish husband, Frederick, Richard Jordan, resents her success. Renata supports many of the decisions that Eve wants to make about her own livelihood but does not actually spend time with her or engage with her in the way that Joey does. The third sister Flyn, Kristin Griffith, is a cocaine addicted actress who is being sexually pursued by Frederick. Eve and Arthur separate early in the film and this causes havoc for all of the members of the family as he meets a new woman Pearl, Maureen Stapleton, and decides he wants to marry her shortly after meeting her. Page is inarguably the greatest actress of all time, in my opinion, and here her talents are on full display as a petty, narcissistic woman who is insufferable but also hurting from the neglecting of her family. When Eve makes a dramatic suicide attempt Page flops down on an ottoman and poses as though a glamorous model. She later has several outbursts that would seem strange and illogical coming out of any other actress's mouth but Page is able to completely disappear into her character and display a pathetic nature that is both pitiable and intolerable. Seeing Page and Hurt have arguments in which Hurt attempts to talk around issues while Page attempts to ignore them altogether is fabulously entertaining because Page really tears into her role while Hurt's more reserved performance complements her beautifully. Also of note is Maureen Stapleton as the interloper is also great as my view of her shifted the same way that the daughters in the film change how they see her. During her first interaction with them the character appears over eager to impress and annoyingly won't stop talking, Stapleton captures the right balance of anxious and insistent. As Eve becomes more and more uncontrollable we see Pearl stand by Arthur and attempt to keep calm and be a stable presence during a difficult time. When we get a close up on her shocked face during the climactic scene of the movie it is impossible not to be sympathetic to her pain. Stapleton is alive with a nervous energy but her genuine warmth and sweetness begins to shine through as we spend more and more time with her and by the end of the film she is the most sympathetic character. The final shot of Keaton, Hurt and Griffith standing together in front of the window is rightfully iconic. These three sisters are clearly very different and their experiences during the penultimate scene of the film were equally traumatic, for Flyn possibly more so, but we understand that they have reconciled their differences and can now stand together in unity. If you are going to watch any Woody Allen film please don't let it be You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (2010) or Scoop (2006) but in terms of actually good films that he has directed I would rank this highly.

    Woody Allen made three of his best films back to back in Annie Hall (1977), Interiors and Manhattan (1979). Of the three Interiors is the least comedic as it takes the struggles of the dysfunctional family it follows seriously and scenes that would be played for laughs in other Allen films are seen as containing the horror that they really would. Any Geraldine Page film is worth watching and this film contains one of her best late career performances as the family matriarch, she was absolutely robbed of the Best Actress Academy Award in 1979. The writing of the film is more sensitive to women than most Woody Allen screenplays and the strange relationships that the daughters have with their respective husbands are viewed through the female lens. How I wish that Woody Allen was not an absolute creep in real life so that I could unabashedly love this film but as it stands it's one of the best family dramas I have seen. Eve, Geraldine Page, is the theatrical, high maintenance matriarch of a dysfunctional family that features her selfish husband Arthur, E.G Marshall, who favors his daughter Joey, Mary Beth Hurt, who has become a flighty adult. The daughter he neglected, Renata, Diane Keaton, is a professional success with an aggressive, boorish husband, Frederick, Richard Jordan, resents her success. Renata supports many of the decisions that Eve wants to make about her own livelihood but does not actually spend time with her or engage with her in the way that Joey does. The third sister Flyn, Kristin Griffith, is a cocaine addicted actress who is being sexually pursued by Frederick. Eve and Arthur separate early in the film and this causes havoc for all of the members of the family as he meets a new woman Pearl, Maureen Stapleton, and decides he wants to marry her shortly after meeting her. Page is inarguably the greatest actress of all time, in my opinion, and here her talents are on full display as a petty, narcissistic woman who is insufferable but also hurting from the neglecting of her family. When Eve makes a dramatic suicide attempt Page flops down on an ottoman and poses as though a glamorous model. She later has several outbursts that would seem strange and illogical coming out of any other actress's mouth but Page is able to completely disappear into her character and display a pathetic nature that is both pitiable and intolerable. Seeing Page and Hurt have arguments in which Hurt attempts to talk around issues while Page attempts to ignore them altogether is fabulously entertaining because Page really tears into her role while Hurt's more reserved performance complements her beautifully. Also of note is Maureen Stapleton as the interloper is also great as my view of her shifted the same way that the daughters in the film change how they see her. During her first interaction with them the character appears over eager to impress and annoyingly won't stop talking, Stapleton captures the right balance of anxious and insistent. As Eve becomes more and more uncontrollable we see Pearl stand by Arthur and attempt to keep calm and be a stable presence during a difficult time. When we get a close up on her shocked face during the climactic scene of the movie it is impossible not to be sympathetic to her pain. Stapleton is alive with a nervous energy but her genuine warmth and sweetness begins to shine through as we spend more and more time with her and by the end of the film she is the most sympathetic character. The final shot of Keaton, Hurt and Griffith standing together in front of the window is rightfully iconic. These three sisters are clearly very different and their experiences during the penultimate scene of the film were equally traumatic, for Flyn possibly more so, but we understand that they have reconciled their differences and can now stand together in unity. If you are going to watch any Woody Allen film please don't let it be You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger (2010) or Scoop (2006) but in terms of actually good films that he has directed I would rank this highly.

  • Dec 26, 2018

    A toe dipped in the water of 'serious' drama hammers home its message and seems to undo the point of the 'lighter' films (as Wilde said, take the light things seriously and the serious things lightly), binding us into the characters' existential melancholy to the point where you might want to shout 'look just get over it!'

    A toe dipped in the water of 'serious' drama hammers home its message and seems to undo the point of the 'lighter' films (as Wilde said, take the light things seriously and the serious things lightly), binding us into the characters' existential melancholy to the point where you might want to shout 'look just get over it!'

  • Jun 17, 2018

    My favorite film of all time. A masterpiece.

    My favorite film of all time. A masterpiece.

  • May 13, 2018

    aN interesting film to consider on mothers day. it's easy to write it off as an inept effort at bergman however by the end of the film allen's auteurial voice shines by way of his treatment of the characters. at face value it serves as a fly on the wall expose of a family of cringeworthy cerebral aesthetes with constant bouts of EXISTENTIAL dread. but what elevates it beyond a mere examination of spoiled intellectuals staring deep into the void is the character of maureen stapleton, whose pearl serves as a foil to the family's cynical nature and geraldine page's inadequate mother figure in particular. pearl essentially arrives and by way of her care free, compassionate nature takes the family's cerebral self indulgence and says: shut up. this is what ultimately redeems the film from serving as an inadequate attept at classic bergman and elevates it to a significant and fitting puzzle piece in allen's directorial milieu. Anyway i hope that makes some sense to people. just my take on it....

    aN interesting film to consider on mothers day. it's easy to write it off as an inept effort at bergman however by the end of the film allen's auteurial voice shines by way of his treatment of the characters. at face value it serves as a fly on the wall expose of a family of cringeworthy cerebral aesthetes with constant bouts of EXISTENTIAL dread. but what elevates it beyond a mere examination of spoiled intellectuals staring deep into the void is the character of maureen stapleton, whose pearl serves as a foil to the family's cynical nature and geraldine page's inadequate mother figure in particular. pearl essentially arrives and by way of her care free, compassionate nature takes the family's cerebral self indulgence and says: shut up. this is what ultimately redeems the film from serving as an inadequate attept at classic bergman and elevates it to a significant and fitting puzzle piece in allen's directorial milieu. Anyway i hope that makes some sense to people. just my take on it....

  • Jun 04, 2017

    An intriguing and unsettling film, wonderful character development. Subtlety that delivered an emotional and thought provoking punch that lingered with me. Awkward moments and family tension were close to home. I can highly recommend this film

    An intriguing and unsettling film, wonderful character development. Subtlety that delivered an emotional and thought provoking punch that lingered with me. Awkward moments and family tension were close to home. I can highly recommend this film

  • Apr 14, 2017

    Simple and amazing beyond words.

    Simple and amazing beyond words.

  • Apr 03, 2017

    #WOODYALLENRETRO PODCAST PROJECT Bit of a sharp turn in the filmography but still alot to like, good acting, interesting dialogue and uncomfortable yet mature story - the constant drab tone can feel a bit unnatural but since its a purposfuly made homage to igmar bergman type it can be forgiven - maybe not for everyone but an older crowd will probably appreciate more - good diversity for woody to tackle

    #WOODYALLENRETRO PODCAST PROJECT Bit of a sharp turn in the filmography but still alot to like, good acting, interesting dialogue and uncomfortable yet mature story - the constant drab tone can feel a bit unnatural but since its a purposfuly made homage to igmar bergman type it can be forgiven - maybe not for everyone but an older crowd will probably appreciate more - good diversity for woody to tackle

  • Jan 10, 2017

    In a lot of ways the father of the modern indie drama. Brilliant directing, use of color, shot composition, and command of excellent cast of characters brought to life with relatable and candid acting. Woody channels the pensive philosophical nature of his comedies into a very reflective, thoughtful drama.

    In a lot of ways the father of the modern indie drama. Brilliant directing, use of color, shot composition, and command of excellent cast of characters brought to life with relatable and candid acting. Woody channels the pensive philosophical nature of his comedies into a very reflective, thoughtful drama.