Jay & Silent Bob Reboot

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74%

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Total Count: 19

94%

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Verified Ratings: 515
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Movie Info

The stoner icons who first hit the screen 25 years ago in CLERKS are back! When Jay and Silent Bob discover that Hollywood is rebooting an old movie based on them, the clueless duo embark on another cross-country mission to stop it all over again!

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Critic Reviews for Jay & Silent Bob Reboot

All Critics (19) | Top Critics (4) | Fresh (14) | Rotten (5)

  • Awkward and unfunny in exceptionally long stretches, Reboot probably won't turn his diehard fans against him. But it's unlikely to win him any new converts either. For that, there's Clerks, Mallrats, or Chasing Amy.

    Oct 17, 2019 | Rating: D+ | Full Review…
  • The most uninspired and unfocused load of fan service that Smith has yet unleashed on his remaining hardcore audience.

    Oct 16, 2019 | Rating: 1.5/4 | Full Review…
  • A 3,000-mile drive that's almost entirely fueled by fan service...Smith basically just swings from cameo to cameo in the hopes that no one will care that his movie is short on actual scenes.

    Oct 16, 2019 | Rating: C | Full Review…
  • Smith has every right to be older and wiser here, and "Jay and Silent Bob Reboot," with its gentle anarchy and not-quite-mock nostalgia, is a time-machine sequel that passes the time amiably enough.

    Oct 16, 2019 | Full Review…
  • If you're expecting a hysterically good time out of Jay And Silent Bob Reboot, you'll get just that.

    Oct 24, 2019 | Rating: 4/5 | Full Review…
  • Smith has crafted a heartfelt, thoughtful film with Jay and Silent Bob Reboot. You didn't read that incorrectly.

    Oct 22, 2019 | Full Review…

Audience Reviews for Jay & Silent Bob Reboot

  • Oct 30, 2019
    Jay and Silent Bob Reboot is strictly made for writer/director Kevin Smith's fanbase, so does trying to play outside this cultivated audience even matter? Honestly, there's no way this is going to be anyone's first Smith movie, so it's already running on an assumed sense of familiarity with the characters and stories of old, which is often a perquisite to enjoying many of the jokes (more on this later). It's been 25 years since Clerks originally debuted and showcased Smith's ribald and shrewd sense of dialogue-driven, pop-culture-drenched humor. He's created his own little sphere with a fervent fanbase, so does he need to strive for a larger audience with any forthcoming movies or does he simply exclusively serve the existing crowd? Jay (Jason Mewes) and his hetero life mate Silent Bob (Smith) are out for vengeance once again. Hollywood is rebooting the old Bluntman and Chronic superhero movie from 2001, this time in a dark and edgy direction, and since Jay and Silent Bob are the inspirations for those characters, even their likenesses and names now belong to the studio. The stoner duo, older and not so much wiser, chart a cross-country trip to California to attend ChronicCon and thwart the filming of the new movie, directed by none other than Kevin Smith (himself). Along the way, Jay and Bob discover that Jay's old flame Justice (Shannon Elizabeth) has had a daughter, Millenium "Milly" Falcon (Harley Quinn Smith) and Jay is the father. Milly forces Jay and Bob to escort her and her group of friends to ChronicCon and Jay struggles with holding back his real connection. One of my major complaints with 2016's Yoga Hosiers (still the worst film of his career) was that it felt like it was made for his daughter, her friends, and there was no point of access for anyone else. It felt like a higher-budget home movie that just happened to get a theatrical release. Jay and Silent Bob Reboot feels somewhat similar, reaching back to the 2001 comedy that itself was reaching back on a half-decade of inter-connected Smithian characters. There is a certain degree of frantic self-cannibalism here but if the fans are happy then does Smith need to branch out? This is a question that every fan will have to answer personally. At this point, do they want new stories in the same style of the old or do they just want new moments with the aging characters of old to provide an ever-extending coda to their fictional lives? I certainly enjoyed myself but I could not escape the fact at how eager and stale much of the comedy came across. Smith has never been one to hinge on set pieces and more on character interactions, usually profane conversations with the occasional slapstick element. This is one reason why the original Jay and Silent Bob Strikes Back suffers in comparison to his more character-driven comedies. Alas, the intended comedy set pieces in Reboot come across very flat. A lustful fantasy sequence never seems to take off into outrageousness. A drug trip sequence begins in a promising and specific angle and then stalls. The final act has a surprise villain that comes from nowhere, feels incredibly dated, and delivers few jokes beyond a badly over-the-top accent and its sheer bizarre randomness. There's a scene where the characters stumble across a KKK rally. The escape is too juvenile and arbitrary. A courtroom scene has promise when Justin Long appears as a litigation attorney for both sides, but the joke doesn't go further, capping out merely at the revelation of the idea. This is indicative of much of Reboot, where the jokes appear but are routinely easy to digest and surface-level, seldom deepening or expanding. There's a character played by Fred Armison who makes a second appearance, leading you to believe he will become a running gag that will get even more desperate and unhinged with each new appearance as he seeks vengeance. He's never seen again after that second time. There are other moments that feel like setups for larger comedic payoffs but they never arrive. The actual clip of the Bluntman and Chronic film, modeled after Zack Snyder's Batman v. Superman, is almost absent any jokes or satire. There are fourth-wall breaks that are too obvious to be funny, as they rest on recognition alone. There's a running joke where Silent Bob furiously taps away at a smart phone to then turn around and showcase a single emoji. It's cute the first time, but then this happens like six more times. Strangely it feels like Smith's sense of humor has been turned off for painfully long durations on this trip down memory lane. The structure is so heavily reminiscent of Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back that there are moments that repeat step-for-step joke patterns but without new context, meaning the joke is practically the repetition itself. The problem with comedy is that familiarity can breed boredom, and during the funny stretches, I found myself growing restless with Reboot as we transitioned from stop to stop among the familiar faces. I enjoyed seeing the different characters again but many of them had no reason to be involved except in a general "We're bringing the band back together" camaraderie. It's nice to see Jason Lee again but if he doesn't have any strong jokes, why use him in this way? Let me dig further with Lee to illustrate the problem at heart with Reboot. Jay and Silent Bob visit Brodie (Lee) at his comic book shop, which happens to be at the mall now. He complains that nobody comes to the mall any longer and he has to worry about the "mallrats," and then he clarifies, he's talking about actual rodents invading the space, and he throws a shoe off screen. I challenge anyone to find that joke amusing beyond a so-bad-it's-fun dad joke reclamation. I kept waiting for Smith to rip open some satirical jabs on pop culture since 2006's Clerks II. In the ensuing years, Star Wars and Marvel have taken over and geek culture and comic books rule the roost. Surely a man who made his bones on these topics would have something to say about this moment of over saturation, let alone Hollywood's narrow insistence on cash-grab remakes. I kept waiting for the Smith of old to have some biting remarks or trenchant commentary. Milly's diverse group of friends (including a Muslim woman named "Jihad") is referred to like it's a satirical swipe at reboots, but there isn't a joke there unless the joke is, "Ha ha, everyone has to be woke these days," which is clunky and doesn't feel like Smith's point of view. There are several moments where I felt like the humor was trying too hard or not hard enough. As a result, I chuckled with a sense of familiarity but the new material failed to gain much traction. I do want to single out one new addition that I found to be hysterical, and that is Chris Hemsworth as a hologram version of himself at a convention. The Thor actor has opened up an exciting career path in comedy as highlighted by 2017's Ragnarok, but just watching his natural self-effacing charm as he riffs about the dos and don'ts of acceptable behavior with his hologram is yet another reminder that this man is so skilled at hitting all the jokes given to him. Where the movie succeeds best is as an unexpected and heartfelt father/daughter vehicle, with Jay getting a long-delayed chance to mature. It's weird to say that a movie with Jay and Silent Bob in starring roles would succeed on its dramatic elements, but that's because it feels like this is the territory that Smith genuinely has the most interest in exploring. The concept of Jay circling fatherhood and its responsibilities is a momentous turn for a character that has previously been regarded as a cartoon. His growing relationship with Milly is the source of the movie's best scenes and the two actors have an enjoyable and combative chemistry, surely aided by the fact that Mewes has known Harley Quinn Smith her entire existence. This change agent leads to some unexpected bursts of paternal guidance from Jay, which presents an amusing contrast when the goofy stoner character is tasked with being a responsible parent. There's a clever through line of the difference between a reboot and a remake, and Smith takes this concept and brilliantly repackages it into a poignant metaphor about parenthood. Smith's position has a father has softened him up a bit but it's also informed his worldview and he's become very unabashedly sentimental, and when he puts in the right attention, it works. There's an end credit clip with the late Stan Lee where Smith is playing a potential Reboot scene with the man, and it's so sweet to watch the genuine affection both men have for one another. I'm raising the entire grade for this movie simply for a wonderful extended return of Ben Affleck's Holden McNeil character, the creator of Bluntman and Chronic. We get a new ending for 1997's Chasing Amy that touches upon all the major characters and allows them to be wise and compassionate. It's a well-written epilogue that allows the characters to open up on weightier topics beyond the standard "dick and fart" jokes that are expected from a Smith comedy. It's during this sequence where the movie is allowed to settle and say something, and it hits. The highly verbose filmmaker has been a favorite of mine since I discovered a VHS copy of Clerks in the late 90s. I will always have a special place for the man and see any of his movies, even if I'm discovering that maybe some of the appeal is starting to fade. I don't know if we're ever going to get a Kevin Smith movie that is intended for wide appeal. Up next is Clerks 3, which the released plot synopsis reveals is essentially the characters of Clerks making Clerks in the convenience store, which just sounds overpoweringly meta-textual. He's working within the confines of a narrow band and he seems content with that reality. I had the great fortune to attend the traveling road show for this film and saw Smith and Mewes in person where they introduced the film and answered several questions afterwards. Even though it was after midnight (on a school night!) I was happy I stayed because it was easy to once again get caught up in just how effortlessly Smith can be as a storyteller, as he spins his engaging personal yarns that you don't want to end. As a storyteller, I'll always be front and center for this gregarious and generous man. As a filmmaker, I'll always be thankful for his impact he had on my fledgling ideas of indie cinema and comedy, even if that means an inevitable parting of ways as he charts a well-trod familiar path. Jay and Silent Bob Reboot is made strictly for the fans, and if you count yourself among that throng, you'll likely find enough to justify a viewing, though it may also be one of diminished returns. Nate's Grade: C+
    Nate Z Super Reviewer
  • Oct 16, 2019
    Haven't laughed that hard in a long time. Kudos to Kevin Smith, for not only hitting our funny bones so hard. But, tugging at our heart strings as well. Which was welcome and unexpected. Solid movie! So good!!!!! Also, Jason Mewes killed it so hard in this movie. Great job, sir!
    Jason R Super Reviewer

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